Re: fury roadmaster test report

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Carl Fogel, Apr 3, 2004.

  1. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    [email protected] (Carl Fogel) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    [snip]

    After a month of fine weather, water began falling
    from the skies last night, an unusual and disturbing
    event in my neck of the woods--I fear the worst and
    will not re-read Genesis, much less risk my Roadmaster
    Fury in such damp conditions.

    Perhaps a turkey vulture will return with an olive leaf
    this afternoon to encourage me to go riding. The whole
    flock arrived last week for Spring and are now perched
    on their favorite blue spruce, looking dank and dismal.
    The neighbor in whose tree they roost fails to admire
    their airy grace, complaining of the commotion (two dozen
    birds nearly three feet tall flap noisly) and the filth
    (two dozen birds nearly three feet tall . . . )

    Foul weather and turkey buzzard droppings are not the
    Fury Roadmaster's only enemies. A few days ago, I grew
    suspicious and checked its air pressure--45 psi instead
    of 55!

    Now a question gnaws at my peace of mind: did the tires
    really lose 10 psi in a month, or was the difference just
    a disagreement between the dial gauge that I originally
    used to inflate them to 55 psi and the pencil gauge that
    showed 45 psi this week?

    Sadly, the gauges cannot be compared--I used the pencil
    gauge only because I can't find the dial gauge. (My
    touring bike's tires thrive on a simpler diet of whatever
    my air compressor provides, about 120-125 psi--no fuss,
    no adjustment, no checking, just open the valve wide and
    apply the chuck.)

    Is one kind of air gauge more accurate than the other?
    That is, should I favor a dial gauge over a pencil?

    Carl Fogel
     
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  2. DRS

    DRS Guest

    Carl Fogel <[email protected]> wrote in message
    [email protected]

    [...]

    > Is one kind of air gauge more accurate than the other?
    > That is, should I favor a dial gauge over a pencil?


    My wetware says you should favour a dial guage over a pencil but can't
    remember the link which explains cogently and credibly why this is so.

    --

    A: Top-posters.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
     
  3. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 3 Apr 2004 10:22:27 -0800, [email protected] (Carl Fogel)
    wrote:
    >Now a question gnaws at my peace of mind: did the tires
    >really lose 10 psi in a month, or was the difference just
    >a disagreement between the dial gauge that I originally
    >used to inflate them to 55 psi and the pencil gauge that
    >showed 45 psi this week?


    Yes, and probably.

    >Is one kind of air gauge more accurate than the other?
    >That is, should I favor a dial gauge over a pencil?


    I seem to get the most consistent* readings out of digital gauges.
    * Consistent with other readings from same gauge as well as other
    gauges.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  4. DRS

    DRS Guest

    Carl Fogel <[email protected]> wrote in message
    [email protected]

    [...]

    > I'm still appalled by the idea of my tires losing
    > 10 psi in a month and will watch them carefully.


    You obviously don't use Contis.

    --

    A: Top-posters.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
     
  5. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    DRS wrote:

    > Carl Fogel <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > [email protected]
    >
    > [...]
    >
    >
    >>I'm still appalled by the idea of my tires losing
    >>10 psi in a month and will watch them carefully.

    >
    >
    > You obviously don't use Contis.


    A set of Continental bicycle tires would cost more than Mr. Fogel's
    bicycle shaped object, leaving no money for sweetened torroidal shaped
    foods.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities (Illinois Side)
     
  6. carlfogel

    carlfogel Guest

    Tom Sherman wrote:
    > DRS wrote:
    > > Carl Fogel <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > [email protected]
    > >
    > > [...]
    > >
    > >
    > >>I'm still appalled by the idea of my tires losing 10 psi in a month
    > >>and will watch them carefully.

    > >
    > >
    > > You obviously don't use Contis.

    > A set of Continental bicycle tires would cost more than Mr. Fogel's
    > bicycle shaped object, leaving no money for sweetened torroidal
    > shaped foods.
    > --
    > Tom Sherman - Quad Cities (Illinois Side)




    Dear Tom and Drs,

    It occurs to me that you might both be dying to know what kind of tires
    equip the Fury Roadmaster, but are too shy and timid to inquire forthrightly--
    poor moths, beating your wings against the candle-flame!

    Emblazoned on the side in raised lettering is "Maxxis," but I cannot
    find any model name, nor does the Maxxis site show any tread pattern
    nearly as ferocious. Possibly knobs this blatant are outlawed in kinder
    and gentler states.

    I hoped that they would turn out to be the happily named "Minotaur"
    model, but no luck. The "Hookworm" tread pattern may be the most aptly
    and disgustingly named tire ever imagined:

    http://www.maxxis.com/bike/main.asp

    All the tires listed on the site seem to be rather more expensive than
    mine, which are made in China and say "nylon" on the side--perhaps the
    casing is made of nylon?

    Considerable detail is revealed. The size is 55-559, 26 x 1.95. After
    urging me to inflate them to 40-65 psi, Maxxis reminds me that the
    minium is 40 psi and the maxium is 65 psi. Then I'm told 280-450 KPa, or
    2.8-4.5 Bar.

    While it's easy to mock such redundant labelling, I could have sworn
    that they were 40-55 psi, so now I have to raise the pressure from 55
    to 65 psi, hoping that they don't burst like silk sew-ups scratched on
    the track.

    And they still shouldn't lose air, any more than a doughnut
    should go stale.

    Carl Fogel



    --
     
  7. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    carlfogel wrote:

    > ...
    > I hoped that they would turn out to be the happily named "Minotaur"
    > model, but no luck. The "Hookworm" tread pattern may be the most aptly
    > and disgustingly named tire ever imagined:...


    Dear Carl,

    It appears that the MSRP of a pair of the appropriate size Hookworms
    would be more than a new "Fury Roadmaster". Thus the economical choice
    when the OEM tires wear out would be to replace the bicycle with a new
    one. :(
    <http://www.maxxis.com/bike/productDetail.asp?BrandID=263>.

    The smaller size Hookworms are considerably less expensive.
    <http://www.maxxis.com/bike/productDetail.asp?BrandID=49>.

    On the Earth Cycles Dragonflyer, a replacement set of three tires would
    cost less than 2% of the original MSRP.
    <http://www.ihpva.org/incoming/2002/Dragonflyer/df10.jpg>.

    Speaking of off-color tire names, there are the Snafu Rim Job and Snafu
    Knob Job. I suppose that we can be thankful that Snafu does not make an
    air pump.

    < http://www.snafubmx.com/pages/products/rim_job.html>.
    < http://www.snafubmx.com/pages/products/knob_job.html>.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities (Illinois Side)
     
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