Re: hip replacement --and cycling

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Tom Sherman, Jan 8, 2008.

  1. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Leo Lichtman wrote:
    > "ilaboo" wrote: (clip) if you have a hip replacement could you let me know
    > what effect it has had
    >> on you cycling? and how long it took after surgery to ride a bike again?
    >> and what precautions you take while biking? (clip)

    > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > I stopped riding a number of years ago because of the pain in my hip. After
    > the surgery, I was back on the bike within a few months. You have to heed a
    > mixed message. Riding helps you recover. However, my surgeon warned me
    > that if I fell and broke my hip, my life would never be the same again....


    Google "recumbent trike".

    --
    Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
    "And never forget, life ultimately makes failures of all people." A. Derleth
     
    Tags:


  2. JimmyMac

    JimmyMac Guest

    On Jan 8, 7:42 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    > Leo Lichtman wrote:
    > > "ilaboo" wrote: (clip) if you have a hip replacement could you let me know
    > > what effect it has had
    > >> on you cycling? and how long it took after surgery to ride a bike again?
    > >> and what precautions you take while biking? (clip)

    > > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > > I stopped riding a number of years ago because of the pain in my hip. After
    > > the surgery, I was back on the bike within a few months. You have to heed a
    > > mixed message. Riding helps you recover. However, my surgeon warned me
    > > that if I fell and broke my hip, my life would never be the same again....

    >
    > Google "recumbent trike".
    >
    > --
    > Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
    > "And never forget, life ultimately makes failures of all people." A. Derleth


    My wife has a friend whose mother has had both hips and both knees
    replaced and she rides a conventional upright. Artificial joints
    reduce the range of motion somewhat, but apparently not significantly
    enough to curtail riding a bicycle. - Jim McNamara
     
  3. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    JimmyMac aka Jim McNamara wrote:
    > On Jan 8, 7:42 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >> Leo Lichtman wrote:
    >>> "ilaboo" wrote: (clip) if you have a hip replacement could you let me know
    >>> what effect it has had
    >>>> on you cycling? and how long it took after surgery to ride a bike again?
    >>>> and what precautions you take while biking? (clip)
    >>> ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    >>> I stopped riding a number of years ago because of the pain in my hip. After
    >>> the surgery, I was back on the bike within a few months. You have to heed a
    >>> mixed message. Riding helps you recover. However, my surgeon warned me
    >>> that if I fell and broke my hip, my life would never be the same again....

    >> Google "recumbent trike".
    >>

    > My wife has a friend whose mother has had both hips and both knees
    > replaced and she rides a conventional upright. Artificial joints
    > reduce the range of motion somewhat, but apparently not significantly
    > enough to curtail riding a bicycle. - Jim McNamara


    Well, the point of Leo Licthman was that the surgeon told him that
    breaking a hip in a fall would be a very bad thing. Falling and breaking
    a hip on a conventional upright is a lot more likely than if the same
    rider was on a recumbent trike.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
    "And never forget, life ultimately makes failures of all people." A. Derleth
     
  4. JimmyMac

    JimmyMac Guest

    On Jan 11, 5:19 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    > JimmyMac aka Jim McNamara wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jan 8, 7:42 pm, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >> Leo Lichtman wrote:
    > >>> "ilaboo" wrote: (clip) if you have a hip replacement could you let me know
    > >>> what effect it has had
    > >>>> on you cycling? and how long it took after surgery to ride a bike again?
    > >>>> and what precautions you take while biking? (clip)
    > >>> ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > >>> I stopped riding a number of years ago because of the pain in my hip. After
    > >>> the surgery, I was back on the bike within a few months. You have to heed a
    > >>> mixed message. Riding helps you recover. However, my surgeon warned me
    > >>> that if I fell and broke my hip, my life would never be the same again....
    > >> Google "recumbent trike".

    >
    > > My wife has a friend whose mother has had both hips and both knees
    > > replaced and she rides a conventional upright. Artificial joints
    > > reduce the range of motion somewhat, but apparently not significantly
    > > enough to curtail riding a bicycle. - Jim McNamara

    >
    > Well, the point of Leo Licthman was that the surgeon told him that
    > breaking a hip in a fall would be a very bad thing. Falling and breaking
    > a hip on a conventional upright is a lot more likely than if the same
    > rider was on a recumbent trike.


    No arguments there. That's a given, for sure. I was merely
    addressing ilaboo's initial concern/question.

    > Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
    > "And never forget, life ultimately makes failures of all people." A. Derleth
     
  5. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    "Tom Sherman" wrote: Well, the point of Leo Licthman was that the surgeon
    told him that
    > breaking a hip in a fall would be a very bad thing. (clip)

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    Yes, that's exactly what the surgeon was telling me. He also went on to say
    that I would have to judge whether to limit my enjoyment of life in fear of
    such a disaster. If you rein yourself in to avoid risks, you swap the
    possibility of injury for the certainty of boredom. (He didn't say a word
    about recumbents.)
     
  6. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Leo Lichtman wrote:
    > "Tom Sherman" wrote: Well, the point of Leo Licthman was that the surgeon
    > told him that
    >> breaking a hip in a fall would be a very bad thing. (clip)

    > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > Yes, that's exactly what the surgeon was telling me. He also went on to say
    > that I would have to judge whether to limit my enjoyment of life in fear of
    > such a disaster. If you rein yourself in to avoid risks, you swap the
    > possibility of injury for the certainty of boredom. (He didn't say a word
    > about recumbents.)


    Recumbent trikes are NOT boring. A low tadpole is like a pedal powered
    go-cart. :)

    --
    Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
    "And never forget, life ultimately makes failures of all people." A. Derleth
     
  7. gotbent

    gotbent Guest

    "Leo Lichtman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Tom Sherman" wrote: Well, the point of Leo Licthman was that the surgeon
    > told him that
    >> breaking a hip in a fall would be a very bad thing. (clip)

    > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    > Yes, that's exactly what the surgeon was telling me. He also went on to
    > say that I would have to judge whether to limit my enjoyment of life in
    > fear of such a disaster. If you rein yourself in to avoid risks, you swap
    > the possibility of injury for the certainty of boredom. (He didn't say a
    > word about recumbents.)
    >

    You might ask your doctor about safe hip, leg, trunk angles as getting in
    and out of some recumbent trikes takes a bit of doing. The tadpoles (two
    wheels in front) are generally llow, in the range of eight or ten inches.
    The lower trikes have good stability when cornering. The delta style (one
    wheel front and two in back) are generally higher and a bit more tippy when
    cornering.

    A recumbent trike can be an invigorating thing to ride.



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
  8. In alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent on Fri, 11 Jan 2008 19:48:50 -0600
    gotbent <[email protected]> wrote:
    > You might ask your doctor about safe hip, leg, trunk angles as getting in
    > and out of some recumbent trikes takes a bit of doing. The tadpoles (two
    > wheels in front) are generally llow, in the range of eight or ten inches.
    > The lower trikes have good stability when cornering. The delta style (one
    > wheel front and two in back) are generally higher and a bit more tippy when
    > cornering.


    The Greenspeed Anura doesn't seem to have a rep for being tippy. And
    it's higher than other Greenspeeds, so easier to get in and out of.


    Zebee
     
  9. nhathuy

    nhathuy New Member

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