Re: Hydration pack :-(

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Anthony, Sep 23, 2004.

  1. Anthony

    Anthony Guest

    Ignoramus19691 wrote:

    >Arrived yesterday... It's too heavy, and I will not take it to the
    >half marathon. It will still be useful, as I would like to do some
    >long distance running (10-15 miles in the beginning), and it will
    >probably help during training, where running time is not so critical.
    >
    >I will drink a bit of salt/lite salt solution prior to the run, to
    >ensure that I do not run out of electrolytes. The point that several
    >people made, that a half marathon is too short to be seriously afraid
    >of EL depletion, is taken.
    >
    >i
    >
    >

    I haven't been following all these threads too closely, but I seem to
    remember you saying that you were
    planning a 2 hr + for the 1/2. For that long a race, electrolyte
    replacement could be an issue.
    It's more the amount of *time* that you are running - and not the distance.

    Good luck,

    Anthony.
     
    Tags:


  2. On 2004-09-23, Anthony <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Ignoramus19691 wrote:
    >
    >>Arrived yesterday... It's too heavy, and I will not take it to the
    >>half marathon. It will still be useful, as I would like to do some
    >>long distance running (10-15 miles in the beginning), and it will
    >>probably help during training, where running time is not so critical.
    >>
    >>I will drink a bit of salt/lite salt solution prior to the run, to
    >>ensure that I do not run out of electrolytes. The point that several
    >>people made, that a half marathon is too short to be seriously afraid
    >>of EL depletion, is taken.
    >>
    >>i
    >>
    >>

    > I haven't been following all these threads too closely, but I seem to
    > remember you saying that you were
    > planning a 2 hr + for the 1/2. For that long a race, electrolyte
    > replacement could be an issue.
    > It's more the amount of *time* that you are running - and not the distance.


    It's not just time, but time and intensity. It shouldn't be an issue in a
    2 hour jog in reasonably cool conditions. It would be an issue during an
    all-out race, but this is not what he's doing.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  3. On 2004-09-23, Ignoramus19691 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What I need, in the end, is being able to make a correct decision
    > about what to do regarding hydration and electrolytes, within my
    > constraints (no gatorade).


    You've already made the wrong choices on all the important points (your
    "constraints"), it doesn't really matter a whole lot what you do about
    electrolytes. I can assure you that many people complete runs of 2hrs
    duration on a regular basis without worrying too much about electrolytes.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  4. On 2004-09-23, Ignoramus19691 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Would you think that drinking a tiny quantity of alt/lite salt
    > solution prior to race should take care of any potential for
    > "eletrolyte problems"?


    As I've said, I don't think these are an issue. I'd be more worried
    about drinking some strange brew for the first time on race day. One
    thing that applies to a race, even if your goal is just to finish, is
    that you don't want to experiment any more than you have to on race
    day. It's in your interests to sort out all of this in training. Then
    the race is more or less just an extended version of your longest
    training run.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  5. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Ignoramus19691 wrote:

    >
    > Yes, if I run under 2:30, I would be happy, and if I run under 2:15, I
    > would be on top of the world. It is my first race of this distance.
    >
    > What I need, in the end, is being able to make a correct decision
    > about what to do regarding hydration and electrolytes, within my
    > constraints (no gatorade).


    This is what you learn on training runs. Since your diet is different
    than what many here use and extremely low training, your hydration and
    electrolyte needs may vary also from what anyone here might suggest.
    It's like picking a number out of the hat.

    >
    > Are there "electrolyte pills" sold at pharmacies perhaps? I would then
    > put one or two into my pocket and drink with water on the way. That
    > would be an easy and clearly no-mistake solution regarding keeping
    > electrolyte balance. Carrying a tiny bit of mix of salt and lite salt
    > is also a possibility.


    yes, but the best ones are usually mail order (google past threads
    here). Some people use salty snacks. You might consider something like
    jerky or a slim jim to suck on if needed. But all these should be tested
    in training.

    Electrolytes are needed to replace primarily sodium lost through sweat
    (some other electrolytes also, but sodium is primary one). Your need for
    electrolytes on any given day will depend on how much you sweat under
    given environmental conditions (temperature, dew point), its salt
    content, how much water you consume (straight, sports drink, or food),
    and your acclimatization. If you don't get enough fluid, you dehydrate.
    If you have too few electrolytes for the amount of fluid you drink, you
    could develop hyponatremia (google for many threads). Usually they worry
    about this in post-4 hr marathoners, but it could happen earlier. It may
    not kill you in 2.5 hrs, but it could affect the way you feel and
    recover. This can be found in google.

    Dot
    google's your friend

    --
    "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste
    away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
     
  6. Janithor

    Janithor Guest

    x-no-archive: yes

    Donovan Rebbechi wrote:
    > On 2004-09-23, Anthony <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Ignoramus19691 wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Arrived yesterday... It's too heavy, and I will not take it to the
    >>>half marathon. It will still be useful, as I would like to do some
    >>>long distance running (10-15 miles in the beginning), and it will
    >>>probably help during training, where running time is not so critical.
    >>>
    >>>I will drink a bit of salt/lite salt solution prior to the run, to
    >>>ensure that I do not run out of electrolytes. The point that several
    >>>people made, that a half marathon is too short to be seriously afraid
    >>>of EL depletion, is taken.
    >>>
    >>>i
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>I haven't been following all these threads too closely, but I seem to
    >>remember you saying that you were
    >>planning a 2 hr + for the 1/2. For that long a race, electrolyte
    >>replacement could be an issue.
    >>It's more the amount of *time* that you are running - and not the distance.

    >
    >
    > It's not just time, but time and intensity. It shouldn't be an issue in a
    > 2 hour jog in reasonably cool conditions. It would be an issue during an
    > all-out race, but this is not what he's doing.
    >
    > Cheers,



    I ran ~17.5 miles a few weeks back, it took me 4 hours. The temp was
    around 100. I stopped at every drinking fountain along the way and was
    continously drinking water, but from what I've read, electrolyte loss
    during a run isn't a big issue. Is there any research on this issue?
     
  7. Etherized

    Etherized Guest

    << google past threads here).>>

    yes, she's right. Google's just a cloud layer, sort of like the Ozone. just
    get through...

    _______
    Blog, or dog? Who knows. But if you see my lost pup, please ping me!
    <A
    HREF="http://journals.aol.com/virginiaz/DreamingofLeonardo">http://journal
    s.aol.com/virginiaz/DreamingofLeonardo</A>
     
  8. Etherized

    Etherized Guest

    << "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste
    away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog >>

    Indeed.
    Ruff, ruff. Bark, bark.

    _______
    Blog, or dog? Who knows. But if you see my lost pup, please ping me!
    <A
    HREF="http://journals.aol.com/virginiaz/DreamingofLeonardo">http://journal
    s.aol.com/virginiaz/DreamingofLeonardo</A>
     
  9. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Janithor wrote:

    >
    > I ran ~17.5 miles a few weeks back, it took me 4 hours. The temp was
    > around 100. I stopped at every drinking fountain along the way and was
    > continously drinking water, but from what I've read, electrolyte loss
    > during a run isn't a big issue. Is there any research on this issue?
    >


    Actually, it can be fatal. And in cases where it's not fatal, it's at
    best unnerving. Google the group for hyponatremia.

    Here's one article to expand your reading
    http://tinyurl.com/6zku2

    You might also look for a 1st person account by Michelle Burr
    (referenced in the above article). It's on the web, but I can't find
    the link at the moment. Newspaper accounts don't do the experience
    justice. While you may say that as an ultrarunner she was out a lot
    longer, but keep in mind that non-ultrarunners may bump into those same
    limits on much, much shorter runs.

    Dot

    --
    "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste
    away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
     
  10. Dot

    Dot Guest

    PS: I should have added that they have changed the way they deal with
    aid stations and medical aid in large marathons as a result of improved
    knowledge of hyponatremia and its prevention / treatment.
     
  11. Matthew

    Matthew Guest

    Janithor <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > I ran ~17.5 miles a few weeks back, it took me 4 hours. The temp was
    > around 100. I stopped at every drinking fountain along the way and was
    > continously drinking water, but from what I've read, electrolyte loss
    > during a run isn't a big issue.


    You've been reading the wrong sources.

    > Is there any research on this issue?


    Google for hyponatremia.
     
  12. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    Janithor <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I ran ~17.5 miles a few weeks back, it took me 4 hours. The temp was
    > around 100. I stopped at every drinking fountain along the way and
    > was continously drinking water, but from what I've read, electrolyte
    > loss during a run isn't a big issue. Is there any research on this
    > issue?


    On any runs over 3 hours I'll take Succeed! caps. On runs shorter than that
    I don't think it is necessary. They supply 344 mg of sodium per capsule.
    One per hour is sufficient. The reason for the capsules is that no sports
    drink has enough sodium in it for long runs. If it did, they wouldn't be
    selling much because it would taste like sea water. Another good reason to
    use caps is that if you put salt in your drink, then you're stuck. You
    can't take more or less sodium. With the caps, you can control the amount
    without messing up the tast of your drink.

    Phil M.

    --
    "Learn from the mistakes of others. You can't live long enough to make
    them all yourself." ­Martin Vanbee
     
  13. On 2004-09-23, Phil M. <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Janithor <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I ran ~17.5 miles a few weeks back, it took me 4 hours. The temp was
    >> around 100. I stopped at every drinking fountain along the way and
    >> was continously drinking water, but from what I've read, electrolyte
    >> loss during a run isn't a big issue. Is there any research on this
    >> issue?

    >
    > On any runs over 3 hours I'll take Succeed! caps. On runs shorter than that
    > I don't think it is necessary. They supply 344 mg of sodium per capsule.
    > One per hour is sufficient. The reason for the capsules is that no sports
    > drink has enough sodium in it for long runs.


    This is an important point. When I say that most distance runners aren't
    attentive to electrolyte replacement during ordinary training runs (<2hrs),
    it should be clear that in my view, taking a modest amount of gatorade during
    or before the run doesn't count.

    I don't think many people will go down with hyponatremia running at a low
    intensity in cool conditions. Where it becomes an issue is either during
    marathons where poorly trained runners overhydrate and/or sweat an enormous
    amount (partly because they are often racing all-out), or during unusually hot
    marathons, or during ultra races.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
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