Re: Hydration pack :-(

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Donovan Rebbechi, Sep 23, 2004.

  1. On 2004-09-23, Ignoramus19691 <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Arrived yesterday... It's too heavy, and I will not take it to the
    > half marathon. It will still be useful, as I would like to do some
    > long distance running (10-15 miles in the beginning), and it will
    > probably help during training, where running time is not so critical.


    I didn't think running time was critical here either though. Do you know
    what your goals are ?

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
    Tags:


  2. teknofyle

    teknofyle Guest

    As I pointed out in an earlier post, you got the wrong pack. The pack you
    got is suitable for biking or hiking perhaps, but anything that big, filled
    with water, on your back is going to be a drag.

    The Camelbak Catalyst is a waist pack. If you're going to go with a
    hydration pack, it is the way to go.

    "Ignoramus19691" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, Donovan Rebbechi
    > wrote:
    >> On 2004-09-23, Ignoramus19691 <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>> Arrived yesterday... It's too heavy, and I will not take it to the
    >>> half marathon. It will still be useful, as I would like to do some
    >>> long distance running (10-15 miles in the beginning), and it will
    >>> probably help during training, where running time is not so critical.

    >>
    >> I didn't think running time was critical here either though. Do you know
    >> what your goals are ?
    >>

    >
    > Good catch... Anyway, I do not want to risk my run by carrying this
    > relatively heavy pack. It is safer to experiment with it later on. No,
    > running time is not terribly important, but I do not want surprises
    > and being too encumbered by the pack or even being too slowed
    > down. The benefit to potential cost ratio does not justify taking it.
    >
    > i
     
  3. Mike Maxwell

    Mike Maxwell Guest

    teknofyle wrote:
    > As I pointed out in an earlier post, you got the wrong pack. The pack you
    > got is suitable for biking or hiking perhaps, but anything that big, filled
    > with water, on your back is going to be a drag.


    I do training runs of an hour or longer (on trails) with one of those
    "tall" (with shoulder straps) Camelbacks all the time, except in the
    summer when they're too hot. I'd much rather wear something on my
    shoulders than around my waist--I hate the feeling of the belt on a
    waist pack, with the full weight of that pack, bouncing against my
    stomach. (The shoulder-worn Camelback does have a waist strap, but its
    only function is to prevent the pack from shifting too far left or
    right, or getting into a pendulum motion. It does not support the
    weight of the pack, and I can wear its waist strap quite loosely.)

    I suppose some summer I'll try one of the waist packs, but for the time
    being I just drop a water bottle at the intersection of some trails, and
    hope no one picks it up. I've had several helpful people put my water
    bottles in trash cans...

    Anyway, I would not say that a shoulder bag is a drag. Nothing says you
    have to fill it all the way. I put about a pint in mine for most runs.
    Whether it would be suitable for the original poster's purpose is a
    question only he can decide.

    Mike McSwell
     
  4. Tim Downie

    Tim Downie Guest

    "teknofyle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > As I pointed out in an earlier post, you got the wrong pack. The pack you
    > got is suitable for biking or hiking perhaps, but anything that big,

    filled
    > with water, on your back is going to be a drag.


    True it looks a bit big for short races but it looks just dandy for ultras.
    ;-)

    Tim
     
  5. teknofyle

    teknofyle Guest

    For Ultras, I'm sure it would be wonderful. But I figure Iggy won't be
    running an Ultra for at least a couple of more weeks.

    "Tim Downie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "teknofyle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> As I pointed out in an earlier post, you got the wrong pack. The pack you
    >> got is suitable for biking or hiking perhaps, but anything that big,

    > filled
    >> with water, on your back is going to be a drag.

    >
    > True it looks a bit big for short races but it looks just dandy for
    > ultras.
    > ;-)
    >
    > Tim
    >
    >
     
  6. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    Ignoramus19691 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > teknofyle wrote:
    >> As I pointed out in an earlier post, you got the wrong pack. The pack
    >> you got is suitable for biking or hiking perhaps, but anything that
    >> big, filled with water, on your back is going to be a drag.
    >>
    >> The Camelbak Catalyst is a waist pack. If you're going to go with a
    >> hydration pack, it is the way to go.

    >
    > Thanks. If I enjoy this race enough to twna to run long distances
    > more, I will buy another HP.


    I agree with teknofyle. CamelBak has some of the best hydration packs for
    runners. Their two waist pack styles, the Catalyst and the FlashFlo, are
    designed specifically for runners. They don't hold as much fluid as the
    over the shoulder style packs, but they ride more smoothly. Not as much
    bounce. I use the FlashFlo, which holds about 50 oz, plus plenty of cargo
    area. I've tried the Rogue, which holds 70 oz, but I never could get used
    to the weight and bouncing on my shoulders and back. Others on the group,
    such as Dot, like the over the shoulder style, so it is a YMMV type of
    thing. The FlashFlo will get me to ~12 miles, for anything past that I'll
    stash bottles on the route. The Catalyst holds 28 oz which for me would
    get me to about 8 miles. At this mileage I would not bring any fluids.
    For runs in the 8 - 10 mile range I bring a hand-held bottle. Again,
    there are bottles designed specifically for runners. The one I use is the
    Brooks Waterboy Handheld.

    http://www.brooksrunning.com/gear/accessories/m_sea_waterhandheld_detail.
    htm

    Another bottle that is very popular amoung ultra runners (those who do
    races of 50 km and up) is the Ultimate direction fastdraw

    http://www.ultimatedirection.com/fastdraw_plus.html
    http://ucsub.colorado.edu/~austinmw/trason2.jpg

    Phil M.

    --
    "Learn from the mistakes of others. You can't live long enough to make
    them all yourself." ­Martin Vanbee
     
  7. Tony

    Tony Guest

    Phil M. wrote in message ...
    >....
    >there are bottles designed specifically for runners. The one I use is the
    >Brooks Waterboy Handheld.
    >
    >http://www.brooksrunning.com/gear/accessories/m_sea_waterhandheld_detail.
    >htm
    >
    >Another bottle that is very popular amoung ultra runners (those who do
    >races of 50 km and up) is the Ultimate direction fastdraw
    >
    >http://www.ultimatedirection.com/fastdraw_plus.html
    >http://ucsub.colorado.edu/~austinmw/trason2.jpg
    >
    >Phil M.
    >


    I find handhelds great for intermediate length runs 80 to 120 mins,
    especially when its hot. You always remember to drink with handhelds.
    After a while you get used to carrying them.

    I've tried bladder waist and shoulder packs, as well as bottle waist packs.
    Finally I found a 2 bottle (40oz) waist pack that works great and does not
    bounce at all. Its ultimate direction, but I think its been discontinued as
    I got it on sale at sierra trading post. It has smaller gear pockets than
    most 2 bottle packs, and the bottles are angled for easy access and so that
    it fits into the small of the back better. I would highly recommend this if
    it can be found. I think Dot got one too.

    I used this pack for my recent 50k and it was perfect. I ended up using
    only one bottle and lending the other one to someone. Bottles are far
    easier to fill in an ultra than bladders. Also it has just the right amount
    of space for gels, energy bars, pouches of clip 2, and a place to strap your
    shirt on the bottom of it. I used this for a very long wilderness run too
    using one hand carry and taking one purifier bottle to refill the other 2
    bottles from streams. Just enough room for minimal survival gear and food
    also.

    - Tony
     
  8. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    "Tony" <[email protected](remove)hotmail.com> wrote:

    > I find handhelds great for intermediate length runs 80 to 120 mins,
    > especially when its hot. You always remember to drink with handhelds.
    > After a while you get used to carrying them.


    Even the first time using the Brooks handheld was comfortable. The neoprene
    strap keeps it nicely secured without having to grip it. The only think is
    that the pouch is so tiny, I'm not sure why they even bothered putting it
    there. Maybe enough room for one Succeed! cap.

    Phil M.
     
  9. Tony

    Tony Guest

    Phil M. wrote in message ...
    >"Tony" <[email protected](remove)hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >> I find handhelds great for intermediate length runs 80 to 120 mins,
    >> especially when its hot. You always remember to drink with handhelds.
    >> After a while you get used to carrying them.

    >
    >Even the first time using the Brooks handheld was comfortable. The neoprene
    >strap keeps it nicely secured without having to grip it. The only think is
    >that the pouch is so tiny, I'm not sure why they even bothered putting it
    >there. Maybe enough room for one Succeed! cap.
    >


    Maybe a key? I think the fastdraw plus has pockets also. I have a couple
    of fastdraws. If I'm only using one or 2 handhelds, there's little need for
    anything else so I didn't bother to upgrade.

    BTW, that Ultimate Direction 2 bottle pack I spoke about is the "Extender
    '02" for those interested.

    - Tony
     
  10. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Tony wrote:

    >
    > I've tried bladder waist and shoulder packs, as well as bottle waist packs.
    > Finally I found a 2 bottle (40oz) waist pack that works great and does not
    > bounce at all. Its ultimate direction, but I think its been discontinued as
    > I got it on sale at sierra trading post. It has smaller gear pockets than
    > most 2 bottle packs, and the bottles are angled for easy access and so that
    > it fits into the small of the back better. I would highly recommend this if
    > it can be found. I think Dot got one too.


    For bottles, I'm using a UD Strider - single, diagonal bottle with a
    small pouch in front (camera or gps size), rides over the hip. I got a
    UD Extender primarily for the detachable pocket in front (really cheap
    sale, got system for what pocket would probably cost if I could find one
    like it, and I'm too lazy right now to build my own). It's got 2
    diagonal bottles, storage in back, as well as small pocket and bungees
    up front. But I've never used it. Although it looks a lot like big
    brother to the strider, it doesn't fit like it (was going to try it one
    day, but decided I wanted something more comfortable). Realistically, if
    I'm going to need 2 bottles, I'm looking at 2 hr and probably want more
    cargo capacity, at least in winter. But I think the diagonal bottles
    help with fit. There's some with horizontal bottles also.

    The Strider is working well for me on hot 45-60 min runs or cooler runs
    up to maybe 1.5 hrs - too short for camelbak but long enough to prefer
    having a drink along.

    I don't think I saw either the Strider or Extender on STP the other day
    when I was browsing, but I think the Strider is still made.

    I use the cb Lobo for summer long runs and Cloudwalker (more gear space
    for fleece) for winter long runs.

    Dot

    --
    "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste
    away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
     
  11. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    Dot <[email protected]#duh?att.net> wrote:

    > The Strider is working well for me on hot 45-60 min runs or cooler
    > runs up to maybe 1.5 hrs - too short for camelbak but long enough to
    > prefer having a drink along.


    I'm still using the FlashFlo. I've grown to really like it and am very
    comfortable with it. The bouncing is very minimal and only at the start
    when I have more than 50 oz pumped into it (specs say it only takes 45 oz).

    > I don't think I saw either the Strider or Extender on STP the other
    > day when I was browsing, but I think the Strider is still made.


    Here's the extender - http://tinyurl.com/6kacs

    Phil M.
     
  12. Mike Tennent

    Mike Tennent Guest

    "Phil M." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Dot <[email protected]#duh?att.net> wrote:
    >
    >> The Strider is working well for me on hot 45-60 min runs or cooler
    >> runs up to maybe 1.5 hrs - too short for camelbak but long enough to
    >> prefer having a drink along.

    >
    >I'm still using the FlashFlo. I've grown to really like it and am very
    >comfortable with it. The bouncing is very minimal and only at the start
    >when I have more than 50 oz pumped into it (specs say it only takes 45 oz).
    >
    >> I don't think I saw either the Strider or Extender on STP the other
    >> day when I was browsing, but I think the Strider is still made.

    >
    >Here's the extender - http://tinyurl.com/6kacs
    >
    >Phil M.



    Jeez, am I the only person who just uses those little plastic water
    bottles (refilled umpteen times before throwing away) you can get in 6
    packs at the store? <g>

    Mike Tennent
    "IronPenguin"
     
  13. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    Mike Tennent <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Phil M." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Dot <[email protected]#duh?att.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>> The Strider is working well for me on hot 45-60 min runs or cooler
    >>> runs up to maybe 1.5 hrs - too short for camelbak but long enough to
    >>> prefer having a drink along.

    >>
    >>I'm still using the FlashFlo. I've grown to really like it and am very
    >>comfortable with it. The bouncing is very minimal and only at the
    >>start when I have more than 50 oz pumped into it (specs say it only
    >>takes 45 oz).
    >>
    >>> I don't think I saw either the Strider or Extender on STP the other
    >>> day when I was browsing, but I think the Strider is still made.

    >>
    >>Here's the extender - http://tinyurl.com/6kacs
    >>
    >>Phil M.

    >
    >
    > Jeez, am I the only person who just uses those little plastic water
    > bottles (refilled umpteen times before throwing away) you can get in 6
    > packs at the store? <g>


    That's what I use for my long runs when I have to go longer than 13 miles.
    I just ask my wife to by herself some coke in plastic 20 oz bottles
    whenever I lose them. Or just rummage around in my neighbor's trash.

    Phil M.
     
  14. DrLith

    DrLith Guest

    "Mike Tennent" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Jeez, am I the only person who just uses those little plastic water
    > bottles (refilled umpteen times before throwing away) you can get in 6
    > packs at the store? <g>
    >
    > Mike Tennent
    > "IronPenguin"


    Nope, although my preference is for 20-oz empty soda bottles. When I run, I
    carry them in a <$10.00 dual-bottle fanny pack (with room for a 3rd bottle
    in the pouch for really long runs).

    DrLith, Skinflint Extraordinaire
     
  15. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Mike Tennent wrote:

    >
    > Jeez, am I the only person who just uses those little plastic water
    > bottles (refilled umpteen times before throwing away) you can get in 6
    > packs at the store? <g>
    >


    Those are the containers of choice for driving and meetings ;) (although
    I have used my camelbak for drives to the Brooks Range) Actually, I
    prefer the gatorade bottles with the twist tops since I don't have to
    unscrew a cap - and still refilling the ones from 3 years ago (when I
    last used gatorade) ;)

    Actually, the little bottles are really bad in cold weather - freeze
    early and hard to get small tops off :(

    And I learned about misjudging hydration 2 yrs ago ;) :(

    Dot

    --
    "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste
    away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
     
  16. Sam

    Sam Guest

    "Dot" <[email protected]#duh?att.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Mike Tennent wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Jeez, am I the only person who just uses those little plastic water
    > > bottles (refilled umpteen times before throwing away) you can get in 6
    > > packs at the store? <g>
    > >

    >
    > Those are the containers of choice for driving and meetings ;) (although
    > I have used my camelbak for drives to the Brooks Range) Actually, I
    > prefer the gatorade bottles with the twist tops since I don't have to
    > unscrew a cap - and still refilling the ones from 3 years ago (when I
    > last used gatorade) ;)
    >
    > Actually, the little bottles are really bad in cold weather - freeze
    > early and hard to get small tops off :(
    >
    > And I learned about misjudging hydration 2 yrs ago ;) :(
    >
    > Dot
    >
    > --
    > "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste
    > away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
    >


    Put a little Gatorade or other sport drink mix in for flavor and the
    freezing point is lowered. Adding a bit of salt lowers it even more.

    Of course, I doubt I ever run long enough when it is cold enough to freeze
    water in a pack!
     
  17. Dot

    Dot Guest

    Sam wrote:


    > Put a little Gatorade or other sport drink mix in for flavor and the
    > freezing point is lowered. Adding a bit of salt lowers it even more.


    not at -20F ;) Full strength gatorade was the fluid in use when I had
    my first slushie while running (probably near 0F). It's an interesting
    sound when the swish-swish in the bottle suddenly turns to clunk-clunk,
    about the same time my hood started freezing, etc.

    >
    > Of course, I doubt I ever run long enough when it is cold enough to freeze
    > water in a pack!
    >


    Camelbaks or other hydration bladders seem to be the weapon of choice up
    here for winter activities. I watched the start of Susitna 100 last year
    - as much to see what they were using for gear as anything else. They
    were using insulation like pipe insulation on their tubes - also like UD
    provides on their winter kits. I don't think I saw a one with the wimpy
    insulation that camelbak has standard on their winter kits. Hydrate or
    die is as important in cold weather as in hot weather.

    Dot

    --
    "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste
    away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
     
  18. Sam

    Sam Guest

    BRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!
    "Dot" <[email protected]#duh?att.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Sam wrote:
    >
    >
    > > Put a little Gatorade or other sport drink mix in for flavor and the
    > > freezing point is lowered. Adding a bit of salt lowers it even more.

    >
    > not at -20F ;) Full strength gatorade was the fluid in use when I had
    > my first slushie while running (probably near 0F). It's an interesting
    > sound when the swish-swish in the bottle suddenly turns to clunk-clunk,
    > about the same time my hood started freezing, etc.
    >
    > >
    > > Of course, I doubt I ever run long enough when it is cold enough to

    freeze
    > > water in a pack!
    > >

    >
    > Camelbaks or other hydration bladders seem to be the weapon of choice up
    > here for winter activities. I watched the start of Susitna 100 last year
    > - as much to see what they were using for gear as anything else. They
    > were using insulation like pipe insulation on their tubes - also like UD
    > provides on their winter kits. I don't think I saw a one with the wimpy
    > insulation that camelbak has standard on their winter kits. Hydrate or
    > die is as important in cold weather as in hot weather.
    >
    > Dot
    >
    > --
    > "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste
    > away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
    >
     
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