Re: Is front wheel wobble caused by nutation?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Doug Huffman, Aug 29, 2005.

  1. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    Precession, mechanical?

    A motion might be characterized as 'nutation' but I don't recall it as a
    cause of motion.


    "jur" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > I haven't seen this idea in print before, but it seems to me that it is
    > obvious - or is the effect of nutation too weak in a bike with rider?
    >
    >
    > --
    > jur
    >
    > I'd rather ride in rain than drive through traffic.
    > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    > jur's Profile: http://www.usenetbikes.com/member.php?userid=4625
    > View this thread: http://www.usenetbikes.com/showthread.php?t=328781
    >
     
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  2. Dan

    Dan Guest

  3. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    Maybe you can understand 'a motion might be *described* as nutation'. I
    still don't see it as a cause of a wheel wobble or as the cause of a motion
    (F=ma).

    The OP may have been referring to mechanical or even gyroscopic precession
    that MIGHT cause a wheel to wobble. Or to coriolis forces but they're
    vanishingly small on the scale of a bike wheel or a commode bowl.


    "Dan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Precession, mechanical?
    >>
    >> A motion might be characterized as 'nutation' but I don't recall it as a
    >> cause of motion.

    >
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutation
    >
     
  4. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precession

    "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Maybe you can understand 'a motion might be *described* as nutation'. I
    > still don't see it as a cause of a wheel wobble or as the cause of a
    > motion (F=ma).
    >
    > The OP may have been referring to mechanical or even gyroscopic precession
    > that MIGHT cause a wheel to wobble. Or to coriolis forces but they're
    > vanishingly small on the scale of a bike wheel or a commode bowl.
    >
    >
    > "Dan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> Precession, mechanical?
    >>>
    >>> A motion might be characterized as 'nutation' but I don't recall it as a
    >>> cause of motion.

    >>
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutation
    >>

    >
    >
     
  5. Dan

    Dan Guest

    "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Maybe you can understand 'a motion might be *described* as nutation'. I
    > still don't see it as a cause of a wheel wobble or as the cause of a
    > motion (F=ma).
    >
    > The OP may have been referring to mechanical or even gyroscopic precession
    > that MIGHT cause a wheel to wobble. Or to coriolis forces but they're
    > vanishingly small on the scale of a bike wheel or a commode bowl.
    >
    >


    Doug-

    I agree with you fully.
     
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