Re: Looking for suggestions for healthy meals

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Melba's Jammin', Mar 26, 2005.

  1. In article <[email protected]>, SteveR
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm looking for suggestions for the breakfast and dinner meals -
    > something healthy, but something that "regular folks" might eat if they
    > were trying to eat healthily rather than what nutritionists would
    > suggest.


    Why do you think there is a difference between what "regular folks"
    might eat vs a nutritionist's suggestion?

    Here are some breakfast ideas that "regular folks" eat:
    Toasted English muffin (whole grain) with peanut butter
    An orange
    A glass of milk

    McDonald's fruit and yogurt parfait
    Coffee or tea

    Cheerios with milk
    Buttered raisin toast
    Banana

    A bagel with cream cheese
    Fresh Fruit - maybe kiwi or strawberries?
    Milk

    Which are what "regular folks" might eat and which are "a nutritionist's
    suggestion"?

    spoiler space






    All four breakfasts are from a booklet from a dietitian -- I left out
    the portion sizes to make them look more "regular" than they do.

    How about dinner?
    Chicken breast
    mashed potatoes
    steamed asparagus spears
    green salad with tomato and dressing
    fruit
    milk

    That's a nutritionist-suggested meal, too. The chicken is a 3-oz
    portion, the potatoes are a half cup measure and the asparagus is 10
    spears. Four fresh apricots for fruit, and skim milk. Dressing is fat
    free. Eminently edible.

    Pork chop
    Barley
    coleslaw
    Green beans
    Milk
    Apple Crisp

    Also a nutritionist-recommended meal. Also quite edible, not to mention
    a lot of foods to put away.

    I'd enjoy any of those meals, and I'm about as "regular" (shut up,
    Sheldon!) as they come.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Arizona vacation pics added 3-24-05.
    "I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
    say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
    performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
     
    Tags:


  2. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, SteveR
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I'm looking for suggestions for the breakfast and dinner meals -
    > > something healthy, but something that "regular folks" might eat if

    they
    > > were trying to eat healthily rather than what nutritionists would
    > > suggest.

    >
    > Why do you think there is a difference between what "regular folks"
    > might eat vs a nutritionist's suggestion?
    >
    > Here are some breakfast ideas that "regular folks" eat:
    > Toasted English muffin (whole grain) with peanut butter
    > An orange
    > A glass of milk
    >
    > McDonald's fruit and yogurt parfait
    > Coffee or tea
    >
    > Cheerios with milk
    > Buttered raisin toast
    > Banana
    >
    > A bagel with cream cheese
    > Fresh Fruit - maybe kiwi or strawberries?
    > Milk
    >
    > Which are what "regular folks" might eat and which are "a

    nutritionist's
    > suggestion"?
    >
    > spoiler space
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > All four breakfasts are from a booklet from a dietitian -- I left out


    > the portion sizes to make them look more "regular" than they do.
    >
    > How about dinner?
    > Chicken breast
    > mashed potatoes
    > steamed asparagus spears
    > green salad with tomato and dressing
    > fruit
    > milk
    >
    > That's a nutritionist-suggested meal, too. The chicken is a 3-oz
    > portion, the potatoes are a half cup measure and the asparagus is 10
    > spears. Four fresh apricots for fruit, and skim milk. Dressing is

    fat
    > free. Eminently edible.
    >
    > Pork chop
    > Barley
    > coleslaw
    > Green beans
    > Milk
    > Apple Crisp
    >
    > Also a nutritionist-recommended meal. Also quite edible, not to

    mention
    > a lot of foods to put away.
    >
    > I'd enjoy any of those meals, and I'm about as "regular" (shut up,
    > Sheldon!) as they come.
    >
    > -Barb


    How can you be "regular" eating all that hospital food unless you tick
    off your menu for a double portion of the stewed prunes... that's the
    hospital patient's secret to survival... that and a smuggled jug of
    vodka.

    Sheldon
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    (snippage)
    > > Also a nutritionist-recommended meal. Also quite edible, not to
    > > mention a lot of foods to put away.


    > > I'd enjoy any of those meals, and I'm about as "regular" (shut up,
    > > Sheldon!) as they come.
    > >
    > > -Barb


    > How can you be "regular" eating all that hospital food unless you tick
    > off your menu for a double portion of the stewed prunes... that's the
    > hospital patient's secret to survival... that and a smuggled jug of
    > vodka.
    >
    > Sheldon


    Those are mere examples, Bucko. Mmmmmmmmmm, fiber! (And I thought I
    told you to shut up!)
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Arizona vacation pics added 3-24-05.
    "I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
    say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
    performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
     
  4. SteveR

    SteveR Guest

    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> writes:
    >In article <[email protected]>, SteveR
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I'm looking for suggestions for the breakfast and dinner meals -
    >> something healthy, but something that "regular folks" might eat if they
    >> were trying to eat healthily rather than what nutritionists would
    >> suggest.

    >
    >Why do you think there is a difference between what "regular folks"
    >might eat vs a nutritionist's suggestion?


    It's the difference between theory and practice. The nutritionist's (or
    dietician's) diet plans are based on what we *should* eat. If most
    people followed what the nutritionists and dieticians say, then Morgan
    Spurlock wouldn't have needed to make _Super Size Me_.

    I'm looking for what an ordinary person eats, thinking of it as a
    healthy diet, rather than the ideal of a "what we should eat" diet.

    >Here are some breakfast ideas that "regular folks" eat:
    >Toasted English muffin (whole grain) with peanut butter
    >An orange
    >A glass of milk


    Peanut butter on an English muffin? Do people really eat that in the
    US? When I lived over there, I never saw or heard of anyone doing that.
    I know people do things differently over there, but the thing that
    struck me was people eating toast *with* their breakfast. In the UK, we
    eat the toast after eating the main breakfast. Say we are eating bacon
    and eggs for breakfast - my observation is that Americans will eat the
    toast along with the bacon and eggs, while Britons finish off the bacon
    and eggs, and then eat the toast. And Americans don't seem to use toast
    racks either, so their toast gets soggy if it's left too long on the
    plate.

    >McDonald's fruit and yogurt parfait
    >Coffee or tea


    Can you buy the parfait at breakfast time? Is anyone really going to go
    to McDonald's and have *just* a parfait, without buying anything else -
    no Egg McMuffins, no hotcakes, nothing? And what about the sugar in the
    coffee?

    >Cheerios with milk
    >Buttered raisin toast
    >Banana


    Frosted or unfrosted raisin toast? No coffee or orange juice? Whole
    milk or skimmed milk?

    >A bagel with cream cheese
    >Fresh Fruit - maybe kiwi or strawberries?
    >Milk


    What size bagel? In my experience, bagels are *huge* things. And made
    sometimes with all sorts of stuff in them.

    Most people, again, would have a glass of juice, probably orange or
    grapefruit, with this sort of breakfast.

    >Which are what "regular folks" might eat and which are "a nutritionist's
    >suggestion"?
    >
    >spoiler space


    [snipped]

    >All four breakfasts are from a booklet from a dietitian -- I left out
    >the portion sizes to make them look more "regular" than they do.
    >
    >How about dinner?
    >Chicken breast
    >mashed potatoes
    >steamed asparagus spears
    >green salad with tomato and dressing
    >fruit
    >milk
    >
    >That's a nutritionist-suggested meal, too. The chicken is a 3-oz
    >portion, the potatoes are a half cup measure and the asparagus is 10
    >spears. Four fresh apricots for fruit, and skim milk. Dressing is fat
    >free. Eminently edible.


    Milk with dinner? Half a cup of mash isn't much at all, and a 3-oz
    helping of chicken is *tiny*. What's in the dressing that makes it
    fat-free? Skimmed milk? Ick.

    >Pork chop
    >Barley
    >coleslaw
    >Green beans
    >Milk
    >Apple Crisp
    >
    >Also a nutritionist-recommended meal. Also quite edible, not to mention
    >a lot of foods to put away.


    How much of each, though? And what do you do with the barley? Where's
    the apple sauce? I thought that *everybody* has apple sauce with pork.

    >I'd enjoy any of those meals, and I'm about as "regular" (shut up,
    >Sheldon!) as they come.


    They sound a bit small to me.

    The point is that I'm not really acquainted with American tastes
    anymore, and I'm looking for things that most people would eat, rather
    than a dietician's diet plan, and none of these sound quite right.

    --
    SteveR
    (throw away the dustbin, send to [email protected] instead)

    Humans are way too stupid to be dumb animals.
    http://www.accidentalcreditor.org.uk/
     
  5. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 13:33:47 +0100, SteveR
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>Here are some breakfast ideas that "regular folks" eat:
    >>Toasted English muffin (whole grain) with peanut butter
    >>An orange
    >>A glass of milk

    >
    >Peanut butter on an English muffin? Do people really eat that in the
    >US?


    Certainly. The peanut butter melts into the crevices- yum!

    > When I lived over there, I never saw or heard of anyone doing that.


    You have to be careful with induction reasoning. I had a European
    friend once who had the opinion that there were no goats in the US
    because he lived here for 3-4 years and never saw one. We had a
    rather heated argument about it; unfortunately I couldn't produce an
    immediate goat to make my point :> Similarly, I don't know
    personally of anyone who cooks with canned soup, yet by reading RFC it
    appears to be a common practice. So we all just see a little slice of
    life wherever we live.

    >I know people do things differently over there, but the thing that
    >struck me was people eating toast *with* their breakfast. In the UK, we
    >eat the toast after eating the main breakfast. Say we are eating bacon
    >and eggs for breakfast - my observation is that Americans will eat the
    >toast along with the bacon and eggs, while Britons finish off the bacon
    >and eggs, and then eat the toast.


    Yes, the (buttered) toast goes with the eggs; it's a wonderful
    combination like potatoes and eggs (which also requires simultaneous
    toast). In fact, it's very sad when the toast runs out leaving the
    remaining eggs by themselves. Eating the toast afterwards is like
    eating the ice cream first, then the hot fudge. :>

    > And Americans don't seem to use toast
    >racks either, so their toast gets soggy if it's left too long on the
    >plate.


    Yet another reason for eating it with the eggs! See, there's a method
    to our madness.

    Give it a try. I thought it odd to put cole slaw *on* a pulled pork
    sandwich when I first saw it, but damn! that's good.

    I do love reading about these little differences and what strikes
    people about others when they travel.

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  6. Ophelia

    Ophelia Guest

    "Curly Sue" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 13:33:47 +0100, SteveR
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>>Here are some breakfast ideas that "regular folks" eat:
    >>>Toasted English muffin (whole grain) with peanut butter
    >>>An orange
    >>>A glass of milk

    >>
    >>Peanut butter on an English muffin? Do people really eat that in the
    >>US?

    >
    > Certainly. The peanut butter melts into the crevices- yum!
    >
    >> When I lived over there, I never saw or heard of anyone doing that.

    >
    > You have to be careful with induction reasoning. I had a European
    > friend once who had the opinion that there were no goats in the US
    > because he lived here for 3-4 years and never saw one. We had a
    > rather heated argument about it; unfortunately I couldn't produce an
    > immediate goat to make my point :> Similarly, I don't know
    > personally of anyone who cooks with canned soup, yet by reading RFC it
    > appears to be a common practice. So we all just see a little slice of
    > life wherever we live.
    >
    >>I know people do things differently over there, but the thing that
    >>struck me was people eating toast *with* their breakfast. In the UK, we
    >>eat the toast after eating the main breakfast. Say we are eating bacon
    >>and eggs for breakfast - my observation is that Americans will eat the
    >>toast along with the bacon and eggs, while Britons finish off the bacon
    >>and eggs, and then eat the toast.

    >
    > Yes, the (buttered) toast goes with the eggs; it's a wonderful
    > combination like potatoes and eggs (which also requires simultaneous
    > toast). In fact, it's very sad when the toast runs out leaving the
    > remaining eggs by themselves. Eating the toast afterwards is like
    > eating the ice cream first, then the hot fudge. :>
    >
    >> And Americans don't seem to use toast
    >>racks either, so their toast gets soggy if it's left too long on the
    >>plate.

    >
    > Yet another reason for eating it with the eggs! See, there's a method
    > to our madness.
    >
    > Give it a try. I thought it odd to put cole slaw *on* a pulled pork
    > sandwich when I first saw it, but damn! that's good.
    >
    > I do love reading about these little differences and what strikes
    > people about others when they travel.


    We do eat eggs on the toast though, in fact we eat several things ON toast

    Ophelia
    Scotland
     
  7. Andy

    Andy Guest

    [email protected] (Curly Sue) wrote in news:4246b761.1110154
    @news-server.nyc.rr.com:

    > Yes, the (buttered) toast goes with the eggs; it's a wonderful
    > combination like potatoes and eggs (which also requires simultaneous
    > toast). In fact, it's very sad when the toast runs out leaving the
    > remaining eggs by themselves. Eating the toast afterwards is like
    > eating the ice cream first, then the hot fudge. :>
    >


    [sobbing] simultaneous toast... eggs by themselves... it's all so ... so
    picturesque... [waahhhh]

    Andy

    --
    "If you can't do it naturally, then fake it."
    - Alfred Hitchcock
    Spoken to Ingrid Bergman
     
  8. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

    > >Speaking of customs, when you have a cup of tea, do you in America put
    > >the milk in first and then the tea, or the tea in first and the milk in
    > >afterwards? (Note that this is a sort of religious question in this
    > >country...)

    >
    > I would never dream of putting milk in tea. Or sugar. Just the tea and
    > me.


    I am not sure of the origins of putting the milk or cream in first. I have
    heart different stories. Some say that putting the milk in first stops the
    milk from bruising, or some such nonsense, while others say that it so that
    the hot tea won't crack the china cups, but you only need to worry about
    that if you use cheap china.

    Either way it doesn't matter to me. Good tea, properly made, should not be
    ruined by adding milk to it. I had a summer job in an alloy smelting plant
    while I was at university. It used to get pretty hot in there and I found
    that the only thing that quenched my thirst was black tea, and I have never
    again learned to appreciate sugar or milk, and especially not cream. In the
    summer I sometimes make up some tea for iced tea, but add no sugar, and add
    a small slice of lemon when served.
     
  9. SteveR <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Speaking of customs, when you have a cup of tea, do you in America
    > put the milk in first and then the tea, or the tea in first and the
    > milk in afterwards? (Note that this is a sort of religious question
    > in this country...)
    >
    >


    I add the coffee cold to my artifical sweetener....Toast and crunchy
    peanut butter...heavy on the butter...one of the reasons I needed to go
    low carb...very addictive, especially with warm rye bread toast.

    --
    No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 7.3, 5.5, 5.6 mmol
    Continuing to be Manitoban
     
  10. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 18:37:23 GMT, Monsur Fromage du Pollet
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I add the coffee cold to my artifical sweetener....Toast and crunchy
    >peanut butter...heavy on the butter...one of the reasons I needed to go
    >low carb...very addictive, especially with warm rye bread toast.
    >

    You're too late, low carb has passed. The new diet is the "glycemic
    index" a la Zone Diet. Even the Atkins Foundation is abandoning net
    carbs and going for glycemic index now that their leader has gone to a
    better place, gorging on cakes, cookies, bread, and other forbidden
    fruit.

    (I'm just sitting here on the sidelines watching the diets go by :>)

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  11. [email protected] (Curly Sue), if that's their real name, wrote:

    >You're too late, low carb has passed. The new diet is the "glycemic
    >index" a la Zone Diet.


    I believe that the glycemic index, which has been out there for quite
    awhile, is just a refinement of low-carb. It's still a low-carb diet, but
    you're planning for a more even distribution of the carbs' metabolism over
    the course of the day. Beautiful thing for diabetics.

    I could have said that better, but I didn't.

    Carol

    --
    Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
     
  12. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 13:20:21 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] (Curly Sue), if that's their real name, wrote:
    >
    >>You're too late, low carb has passed. The new diet is the "glycemic
    >>index" a la Zone Diet.

    >
    >I believe that the glycemic index, which has been out there for quite
    >awhile, is just a refinement of low-carb. It's still a low-carb diet, but
    >you're planning for a more even distribution of the carbs' metabolism over
    >the course of the day. Beautiful thing for diabetics.
    >
    >I could have said that better, but I didn't.


    The Atkin's Revolution Revision has been on the news for the past
    couple of weeks or so. That's what I was referring to :>

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  13. [email protected] (Curly Sue) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 18:37:23 GMT, Monsur Fromage du Pollet
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I add the coffee cold to my artifical sweetener....Toast and
    > >crunchy peanut butter...heavy on the butter...one of the reasons I
    > >needed to go low carb...very addictive, especially with warm rye
    > >bread toast.
    > >

    > You're too late, low carb has passed. The new diet is the "glycemic
    > index" a la Zone Diet. Even the Atkins Foundation is abandoning net
    > carbs and going for glycemic index now that their leader has gone to
    > a better place, gorging on cakes, cookies, bread, and other
    > forbidden fruit.
    >
    > (I'm just sitting here on the sidelines watching the diets go by :>)
    >
    > Sue(tm)
    > Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
    >


    Been there tried the Glycemic index...didn't help...my Blood Glucose
    level went thru the roof. To my body a carb is a carb. Got a whole mess
    of the books though. Some of the recipes look nice. It is a shame but
    that doesn't help me. I tried low Glycemic first...it is a Canadian
    invention you know.

    I guess being the lone hold out bothers some...not me. I was never a
    follow the latest trends kinda guy. I still sport the Don Johnson look of
    personal grooming shaving every other day. (Being a grumpy old fart has a
    few benifits.) But I am thinner. Last Aug I was 265...today I'm 221.
    Hopefully around xmas I'll be in the 180 range as that's my overall goal.
    The 220 wall has slowed my pre-planned scheduled weight loss goal of 5
    lbs a month. Been close for 2 weeks know, just can't seem to break thru.
    The warmer weather will help this as walking will be more appealing so
    more exercise (HA! more like Some) will happen. My lung problems really
    hate any endurance activities.


    --
    No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 7.2, 7.3, 5.5, 5.6 mmol
    Continuing to be Manitoban
     
  14. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 19:57:56 GMT, Monsur Fromage du Pollet
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    <snip>
    >I guess being the lone hold out bothers some...not me. I was never a
    >follow the latest trends kinda guy. I still sport the Don Johnson look of
    >personal grooming shaving every other day. (Being a grumpy old fart has a
    >few benifits.) But I am thinner. Last Aug I was 265...today I'm 221.
    >Hopefully around xmas I'll be in the 180 range as that's my overall goal.
    >The 220 wall has slowed my pre-planned scheduled weight loss goal of 5
    >lbs a month. Been close for 2 weeks know, just can't seem to break thru.
    >The warmer weather will help this as walking will be more appealing so
    >more exercise (HA! more like Some) will happen. My lung problems really
    >hate any endurance activities.


    Congratulations on your loss so far and hope you get off that plateau
    (which I know so well :<) soon!

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  15. aem

    aem Guest

    Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:
    [snip]
    > Hopefully around xmas I'll be in the 180 range as that's my overall
    > goal. The 220 wall has slowed my pre-planned scheduled weight loss
    > goal of 5 lbs a month. Been close for 2 weeks know, just can't seem
    > to break thru. The warmer weather will help this as walking will be
    > more appealing so more exercise (HA! more like Some) will happen. My
    > lung problems really hate any endurance activities.
    >

    I suppose because this is a food ng the diet component of the diet +
    exercise path to healthy living gets all the attention here. This is
    actually quite misdirected, as an increase in regular exercise has far
    greater potential for improving your life than any diet does. Here's a
    link to a very sensible, well-researched article that may increase your
    resolve to increase your walking:

    http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/Exercise.htm
     
  16. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On 27 Mar 2005 12:38:06 -0800, "aem" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:
    > [snip]
    >> Hopefully around xmas I'll be in the 180 range as that's my overall
    >> goal. The 220 wall has slowed my pre-planned scheduled weight loss
    >> goal of 5 lbs a month. Been close for 2 weeks know, just can't seem
    >> to break thru. The warmer weather will help this as walking will be
    >> more appealing so more exercise (HA! more like Some) will happen. My
    >> lung problems really hate any endurance activities.
    >>

    >I suppose because this is a food ng the diet component of the diet +
    >exercise path to healthy living gets all the attention here. This is
    >actually quite misdirected, as an increase in regular exercise has far
    >greater potential for improving your life than any diet does.


    It depends on where you're starting, exercise- and diet-wise and how
    you got there to determine which has a "greater potential for
    improving (one's) life." Your article begins:

    "Although there are no sure-fire recipes for good health, the mixture
    of healthy eating and regular exercise comes awfully close. Most of
    Nutrition Source is dedicated to singing the praises of a good diet.
    This is where exercise gets its due"

    (Nutrition Source is the name of the newsletter.)

    > Here's a
    >link to a very sensible, well-researched article that may increase your
    >resolve to increase your walking:
    >
    >http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/Exercise.htm


    It did increase my resolve to walk across the room and use my exercise
    rider right now!

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  17. [email protected] (Curly Sue), if that's their real name, wrote:

    >On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 13:20:21 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>[email protected] (Curly Sue), if that's their real name, wrote:
    >>
    >>>You're too late, low carb has passed. The new diet is the "glycemic
    >>>index" a la Zone Diet.

    >>
    >>I believe that the glycemic index, which has been out there for quite
    >>awhile, is just a refinement of low-carb. It's still a low-carb diet, but
    >>you're planning for a more even distribution of the carbs' metabolism over
    >>the course of the day. Beautiful thing for diabetics.
    >>
    >>I could have said that better, but I didn't.

    >
    >The Atkin's Revolution Revision has been on the news for the past
    >couple of weeks or so. That's what I was referring to :>


    See? This is what happens when I don't watch the news. LOL! South Beach
    is basically Atkins, plus glycemic index. I assume they were taking too
    much of the market share away from Atkins Nutritionals, so the Atkins group
    did some catching up. It's not a bad thing.

    Thanks, Sue.

    Carol

    --
    Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
     
  18. aem

    aem Guest

    Curly Sue wrote:
    >
    > It depends on where you're starting, exercise- and diet-wise and how
    > you got there to determine which has a "greater potential for
    > improving (one's) life." Your article begins:
    >
    > "Although there are no sure-fire recipes for good health, the mixture
    > of healthy eating and regular exercise comes awfully close. Most of
    > Nutrition Source is dedicated to singing the praises of a good diet.
    > This is where exercise gets its due"
    >
    > (Nutrition Source is the name of the newsletter.)


    I read that last sentence to mean, "This article is where we sing the
    praises of good exercise."

    > It did increase my resolve to walk across the room and use my

    exercise
    > rider right now!


    Then, "my work here is done." <g> -aem
     
  19. On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 17:53:53 +0100, SteveR
    >Speaking of customs, when you have a cup of tea, do you in America put
    >the milk in first and then the tea, or the tea in first and the milk in
    >afterwards? (Note that this is a sort of religious question in this
    >country...)


    I drink my tea with milk, and I put it in afterwards.

    Christine
     
  20. On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 11:42:33 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >I would never dream of putting milk in tea. Or sugar. Just the tea and
    >me.
    >
    >Carol


    Uh oh, guess I had better bring milk for my tea when I am up that way.
    ;)

    Christine
     
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