Re: Looking for suggestions for healthy meals

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Melba's Jammin', Mar 26, 2005.

  1. Ophelia

    Ophelia Guest

    "Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 17:53:53 +0100, SteveR
    >>Speaking of customs, when you have a cup of tea, do you in America put
    >>the milk in first and then the tea, or the tea in first and the milk in
    >>afterwards? (Note that this is a sort of religious question in this
    >>country...)

    >
    > I drink my tea with milk, and I put it in afterwards.


    I learned to drink my tea black when I lived in India and I have never had
    it any other way since

    Ophelia
     


  2. Christine Dabney <[email protected]>, if that's their real name,
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 11:42:33 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I would never dream of putting milk in tea. Or sugar. Just the tea and
    >>me.

    >
    >Uh oh, guess I had better bring milk for my tea when I am up that way.
    >;)
    >
    >Christine


    Hey, you know me. There will be Cream.

    Carol

    --
    Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, SteveR
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> writes:
    > >In article <[email protected]>, SteveR
    > ><[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I'm looking for suggestions for the breakfast and dinner meals -
    > >> something healthy, but something that "regular folks" might eat if they
    > >> were trying to eat healthily rather than what nutritionists would
    > >> suggest.

    > >
    > >Why do you think there is a difference between what "regular folks"
    > >might eat vs a nutritionist's suggestion?

    >
    > It's the difference between theory and practice. The nutritionist's (or
    > dietician's) diet plans are based on what we *should* eat. If most
    > people followed what the nutritionists and dieticians say, then Morgan
    > Spurlock wouldn't have needed to make _Super Size Me_.


    I'm sure. But know that not all "regular" folks eat at McDonald's
    regularly, frequently, occasionally, or ever. "Regular" covers a lot of
    ground, I think. Not all "regular" people are hellbent on eating fast
    food daily or frequently.
    >
    > I'm looking for what an ordinary person eats, thinking of it as a
    > healthy diet, rather than the ideal of a "what we should eat" diet.


    Are you sure that's what you're looking for? You don't seem to want to
    accept my examples. They are examples of a "regular" person attempting
    a balanced meal as part of a balanced daily meal plan. That they also
    receive a dietitian's blessing is just a bonus. I don't think they
    ideas are mutually exclusive.
    >
    > >Here are some breakfast ideas that "regular folks" eat:
    > >Toasted English muffin (whole grain) with peanut butter
    > >An orange
    > >A glass of milk

    >
    > Peanut butter on an English muffin? Do people really eat that in the
    > US?


    Yes.

    > When I lived over there, I never saw or heard of anyone doing that.


    You have my condolences.

    > I know people do things differently over there, but the thing that
    > struck me was people eating toast *with* their breakfast. In the UK, we
    > eat the toast after eating the main breakfast. Say we are eating bacon
    > and eggs for breakfast - my observation is that Americans will eat the
    > toast along with the bacon and eggs, while Britons finish off the bacon
    > and eggs, and then eat the toast. And Americans don't seem to use toast
    > racks either, so their toast gets soggy if it's left too long on the
    > plate.


    What can I say? Isn't life interesting. How peoples in different parts
    of the world have different habits and customs and both are normal.
    I've never experienced soggy toast after sitting on a plate.
    >
    > >McDonald's fruit and yogurt parfait
    > >Coffee or tea

    >
    > Can you buy the parfait at breakfast time?


    Yes.

    > Is anyone really going to go
    > to McDonald's and have *just* a parfait, without buying anything else -


    For sure. I'd wager that a good percentage of Americans skip breakfast
    entirely; a yogurt parfait -- layered fruit and yogurt -- is their
    concession to "eating something for breakfast". I find McDonald's
    sausage to be pretty salty tasting.

    > no Egg McMuffins, no hotcakes, nothing?


    No Egg McMuffins, no hotcakes, no nothing. Yes.

    And what about the sugar in the
    > coffee?


    What about it? Moderation in all things.
    >
    > >Cheerios with milk
    > >Buttered raisin toast
    > >Banana

    >
    > Frosted or unfrosted raisin toast?


    Never heard of frosted raisin toast. Yech. So, plain.

    > No coffee or orange juice?


    Maybe, maybe not. Go ahead, add a cup or two of coffee. Lots of folks
    drink tea. I don't have orange juice every morning for breakfast -- do
    you?

    > Whole milk or skimmed milk?


    I can't speak for the entire population, but many folks drink skim or
    low-fat. I know of no adults (regular or not) who drink whole milk as a
    matter of course. I usually keep a small quantity on hand for cooking
    or for use in my coffee.
    >
    > >A bagel with cream cheese
    > >Fresh Fruit - maybe kiwi or strawberries?
    > >Milk

    >
    > What size bagel? In my experience, bagels are *huge* things. And made
    > sometimes with all sorts of stuff in them.


    What's huge? Grocery store bagels I know about are about 4" diameter
    and maybe an inch thick. And just because they are available with all
    sorts of stuff in them doesn't mean I eat them. I'm not fond of gacky
    sweet bagels, so I only have plain - or else the ones with the savory
    seeds on top. My husband likes the cinnamon raisin ones.
    >
    > Most people, again, would have a glass of juice, probably orange or
    > grapefruit, with this sort of breakfast.


    Which most people? Most people you know? If I'm looking for variety,
    something other than fruit juice will appear regularly. I like bananas;
    I eat them at breakfast fairly frequently.
    >
    > >Which are what "regular folks" might eat and which are "a nutritionist's
    > >suggestion"?
    > >
    > >spoiler space

    >
    > [snipped]
    >
    > >All four breakfasts are from a booklet from a dietitian -- I left out
    > >the portion sizes to make them look more "regular" than they do.
    > >
    > >How about dinner?
    > >Chicken breast
    > >mashed potatoes
    > >steamed asparagus spears
    > >green salad with tomato and dressing
    > >fruit
    > >milk


    > Milk with dinner?


    Uh, yeah. Why not? I don't drink tea; I stop drinking coffee
    mid-morning. I drink too much carbonated sugar-free soda and we have
    milk with our meals. Again, why not?

    > Half a cup of mash isn't much at all,


    No, it isn't.

    > and a 3-oz helping of chicken is *tiny*.



    Depends on how much you like chicken. With other items at the meal, it
    can be a very adequate portion. A boneless leg and thigh weigh about
    that much - maybe a little more, depending.

    > What's in the dressing that makes it fat-free?



    The absence of fat makes it fat free.
    I occasionally dress a mixed green salad with balsamic vinegar and a
    sprinkle of sugar. I occasionally eat the mixed greens naked.

    >Skimmed milk? Ick.


    I don't know of any salad dressing made with skim milk; it doesn't have
    much appeal in a salad dressing to me, either. "Regular" people seem to
    be seeking out lower-fat foods with frequency -- there are many choices
    in the supermarket aisles. They get their mouthfeel -- that sensation
    of body and richness that fat seems to include -- by chemical thickeners
    -- guar guam, etc.
    >
    > >Pork chop
    > >Barley
    > >coleslaw
    > >Green beans
    > >Milk
    > >Apple Crisp
    > >
    > >Also a nutritionist-recommended meal. Also quite edible, not to mention
    > >a lot of foods to put away.

    >
    > How much of each, though?


    Debatable. I grew up in a family where each person was allowed one pork
    chop for a meal. Seemed reasonable to me, inasmuch as we also usually
    had potatoes and at least one other vegetable and it was the norm in our
    home. Imagine my astonishment when a neighbor described alloting three
    or four chops each for her husband and sons. She planned two or three
    for herself. I was astounded.

    > And what do you do with the barley?


    Put it on a fork and then put it in my mouth. I love the chewiness of
    it. A little salt, perhaps, too.

    > Where's the apple sauce? I thought that *everybody* has apple sauce
    > with pork.


    Think again.
    >
    > >I'd enjoy any of those meals, and I'm about as "regular" (shut up,
    > >Sheldon!) as they come.


    > They sound a bit small to me.


    They may be. I know a number of "regular" people who eat reasonable
    portions. I know many who eat larger portions.

    > The point is that I'm not really acquainted with American tastes
    > anymore, and I'm looking for things that most people would eat, rather
    > than a dietician's diet plan, and none of these sound quite right.


    More's the pity; it sucks to be you.
    --
    -Barb, <http://www.jamlady.eboard.com> Arizona vacation pics added 3-24-05.
    "I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
    say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
    performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
     
  4. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 13:33:47 +0100, SteveR
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> writes:

    <snip>
    >>All four breakfasts are from a booklet from a dietitian -- I left out
    >>the portion sizes to make them look more "regular" than they do.
    >>
    >>How about dinner?
    >>Chicken breast
    >>mashed potatoes
    >>steamed asparagus spears
    >>green salad with tomato and dressing
    >>fruit
    >>milk
    >>
    >>That's a nutritionist-suggested meal, too. The chicken is a 3-oz
    >>portion, the potatoes are a half cup measure and the asparagus is 10
    >>spears. Four fresh apricots for fruit, and skim milk. Dressing is fat
    >>free. Eminently edible.

    >
    >Milk with dinner? Half a cup of mash isn't much at all, and a 3-oz
    >helping of chicken is *tiny*. What's in the dressing that makes it
    >fat-free? Skimmed milk? Ick.


    Just a comment on something I missed before: 3 oz is a serving of meat
    and 1/2 cup is a serving of vegetables. I do stick to that myself.

    >>Pork chop
    >>Barley
    >>coleslaw
    >>Green beans
    >>Milk
    >>Apple Crisp
    >>
    >>Also a nutritionist-recommended meal. Also quite edible, not to mention
    >>a lot of foods to put away.

    >
    >How much of each, though? And what do you do with the barley? Where's
    >the apple sauce? I thought that *everybody* has apple sauce with pork.
    >
    >>I'd enjoy any of those meals, and I'm about as "regular" (shut up,
    >>Sheldon!) as they come.

    >
    >They sound a bit small to me.
    >
    >The point is that I'm not really acquainted with American tastes
    >anymore, and I'm looking for things that most people would eat, rather
    >than a dietician's diet plan, and none of these sound quite right.
    >

    Tonight I had a lamb chop (4 oz with bone), spinach (1/2 c),
    wheatberry pilaf with corn (3/4 c), Israeli couscous (1/2 c),
    strawberries, and some chocolate graham sticks (graham crackers).
    Tea.

    Does that sound like what you'd expect?

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  5. Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]>, if that's their real name,
    wrote:

    >Grocery store bagels I know about are about 4" diameter
    >and maybe an inch thick. And just because they are available with all
    >sorts of stuff in them doesn't mean I eat them. I'm not fond of gacky
    >sweet bagels, so I only have plain - or else the ones with the savory
    >seeds on top. My husband likes the cinnamon raisin ones.


    Onion bagels are my favorites, although I seldom buy them anymore. Onion
    bagels with lots of melted butter. :)

    Carol

    --
    Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
     
  6. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
    > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]>, if that's their real

    name,
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Grocery store bagels I know about are about 4" diameter
    > >and maybe an inch thick. And just because they are available with

    all
    > >sorts of stuff in them doesn't mean I eat them. I'm not fond of

    gacky
    > >sweet bagels, so I only have plain - or else the ones with the

    savory
    > >seeds on top. My husband likes the cinnamon raisin ones.

    >
    > Onion bagels are my favorites, although I seldom buy them anymore.

    Onion
    > bagels with lots of melted butter. :)
    >
    > Carol


    Unless they're purchased in NYC they ain't bagels, I'm serious... I've
    tried bagels in about all 48 and NONE are even close to a real bagel...
    NOT EVEN CLOSE... they are just nondescript rolls with a hole. And
    even a perfect NYC bagel once it's been out of the oven more than 60
    minutes it's no longer a bagel... it's just a stale hunk of dough. And
    there is no such thing as a frozen bagel (Lenders ain't any kind of
    bagel), a NYC pigeon has to be starving to peck one, and even then
    won't let it's neighbors see its pecker pecking. And so, unless yoose
    come to NYC you can't have a bagel... and Staten Island doesn't count,
    that's part of Noo Joisey anyways.

    Sheldon
     
  7. On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 17:45:38 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Christine Dabney <[email protected]>, if that's their real name,
    >wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 11:42:33 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    >><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I would never dream of putting milk in tea. Or sugar. Just the tea and
    >>>me.

    >>
    >>Uh oh, guess I had better bring milk for my tea when I am up that way.
    >>;)
    >>
    >>Christine

    >
    >Hey, you know me. There will be Cream.


    Okay, I will probably be labeled as a tea heretic, but I can live with
    Cream for my tea. ;)

    Christine
     
  8. "Sheldon" <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
    >
    >> Onion bagels are my favorites, although I seldom buy them anymore.
    >> Onion bagels with lots of melted butter. :)
    >>
    >> Carol

    >
    >Unless they're purchased in NYC they ain't bagels, I'm serious... I've
    >tried bagels in about all 48 and NONE are even close to a real bagel...
    > NOT EVEN CLOSE... they are just nondescript rolls with a hole. And
    >even a perfect NYC bagel once it's been out of the oven more than 60
    >minutes it's no longer a bagel... it's just a stale hunk of dough. And
    >there is no such thing as a frozen bagel (Lenders ain't any kind of
    >bagel), a NYC pigeon has to be starving to peck one, and even then
    >won't let it's neighbors see its pecker pecking. And so, unless yoose
    >come to NYC you can't have a bagel... and Staten Island doesn't count,
    >that's part of Noo Joisey anyways.


    Well, we Midwesterners don't mind slumming in the bagel department, because
    we don't know any better. I like whatever it is that is being presented as
    a bagel here. I like the plain ones, spread with cream cheese and
    sprinkled with Penzey's Sunny Paris. I'm not sure I'm qualified to use the
    word, "schmear." Heck, I don't even know if I can spell it!

    Carol
    --
    Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
     
  9. Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I can't speak for the entire population, but many folks drink skim
    > or low-fat. I know of no adults (regular or not) who drink whole
    > milk as a matter of course. I usually keep a small quantity on hand
    > for cooking or for use in my coffee.
    >


    On the rare occassion I have milk in the house...it is whole milk...Skim
    milk is for sissies. Don't you know me Barb? I'm the Defender of the
    Noble Beet.

    --
    No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 7.3, 5.5, 5.6 mmol
    Continuing to be Manitoban
     
  10. Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]>, if that's their real
    > name, wrote:
    >
    > >Grocery store bagels I know about are about 4" diameter
    > >and maybe an inch thick. And just because they are available with
    > >all sorts of stuff in them doesn't mean I eat them. I'm not fond
    > >of gacky sweet bagels, so I only have plain - or else the ones with
    > >the savory seeds on top. My husband likes the cinnamon raisin
    > >ones.

    >
    > Onion bagels are my favorites, although I seldom buy them anymore.
    > Onion bagels with lots of melted butter. :)
    >
    > Carol
    >


    Poppy Seed with smoked salmon cream cheese were my delight.

    --
    No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 7.3, 5.5, 5.6 mmol
    Continuing to be Manitoban
     
  11. [email protected] (Curly Sue) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 13:33:47 +0100, SteveR
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> writes:

    > <snip>
    > >>All four breakfasts are from a booklet from a dietitian -- I left
    > >>out the portion sizes to make them look more "regular" than they
    > >>do.
    > >>
    > >>How about dinner?
    > >>Chicken breast
    > >>mashed potatoes
    > >>steamed asparagus spears
    > >>green salad with tomato and dressing
    > >>fruit
    > >>milk
    > >>
    > >>That's a nutritionist-suggested meal, too. The chicken is a 3-oz
    > >>portion, the potatoes are a half cup measure and the asparagus is
    > >>10 spears. Four fresh apricots for fruit, and skim milk.
    > >>Dressing is fat free. Eminently edible.

    > >
    > >Milk with dinner? Half a cup of mash isn't much at all, and a 3-oz
    > >helping of chicken is *tiny*. What's in the dressing that makes it
    > >fat-free? Skimmed milk? Ick.

    >
    > Just a comment on something I missed before: 3 oz is a serving of
    > meat and 1/2 cup is a serving of vegetables. I do stick to that
    > myself.
    >
    > >>Pork chop
    > >>Barley
    > >>coleslaw
    > >>Green beans
    > >>Milk
    > >>Apple Crisp
    > >>
    > >>Also a nutritionist-recommended meal. Also quite edible, not to
    > >>mention a lot of foods to put away.

    > >
    > >How much of each, though? And what do you do with the barley?
    > >Where's the apple sauce? I thought that *everybody* has apple
    > >sauce with pork.
    > >
    > >>I'd enjoy any of those meals, and I'm about as "regular" (shut up,
    > >>Sheldon!) as they come.

    > >
    > >They sound a bit small to me.
    > >
    > >The point is that I'm not really acquainted with American tastes
    > >anymore, and I'm looking for things that most people would eat,
    > >rather than a dietician's diet plan, and none of these sound quite
    > >right.
    > >

    > Tonight I had a lamb chop (4 oz with bone), spinach (1/2 c),
    > wheatberry pilaf with corn (3/4 c), Israeli couscous (1/2 c),
    > strawberries, and some chocolate graham sticks (graham crackers).
    > Tea.
    >
    > Does that sound like what you'd expect?
    >
    > Sue(tm)
    > Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
    >


    Tonight I had a pork steak with bone about 10 oz and about 1/3 lb of
    broiled asparagus (rolled in oil and salt prior to broiling). To
    drink...Tap water and Ice about 10 oz.

    I admit to eating possibly more salt than I should....but asparagus is
    very good well salted.

    --
    No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 7.3, 5.5, 5.6 mmol
    Continuing to be Manitoban
     
  12. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Carol replied to Sheldon:

    >> Unless they're purchased in NYC they ain't bagels, I'm serious... I've
    >> tried bagels in about all 48 and NONE are even close to a real bagel...
    >> NOT EVEN CLOSE... they are just nondescript rolls with a hole. And
    >> even a perfect NYC bagel once it's been out of the oven more than 60
    >> minutes it's no longer a bagel... it's just a stale hunk of dough. And
    >> there is no such thing as a frozen bagel (Lenders ain't any kind of
    >> bagel), a NYC pigeon has to be starving to peck one, and even then
    >> won't let it's neighbors see its pecker pecking. And so, unless yoose
    >> come to NYC you can't have a bagel... and Staten Island doesn't count,
    >> that's part of Noo Joisey anyways.

    >
    > Well, we Midwesterners don't mind slumming in the bagel department,
    > because we don't know any better. I like whatever it is that is being
    > presented as a bagel here. I like the plain ones, spread with cream
    > cheese and sprinkled with Penzey's Sunny Paris. I'm not sure I'm
    > qualified to use the word, "schmear." Heck, I don't even know if I can
    > spell it!


    Over on the West Coast, we have our own versions of bagels. I've had the
    crisp-doughy NYC tori that Sheldon seems to favor, and I prefer the bagels
    here. (I lived in NYC in 1983-84. Maybe those were just bad years for NYC
    bagels.)

    Gimme a toasted onion-sourdough bagel with avocado and alder-smoked salmon,
    please... or a carrot-sesame bagel with hummus and a sprinkling of lemon
    zest... or a pear-walnut bagel with some Humboldt Fog...

    Mmmmm....adrift in bagel-space....

    Bob
     
  13. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Bob wrote:
    > Carol replied to Sheldon:
    >
    > >> Unless they're purchased in NYC they ain't bagels, I'm serious...

    I've
    > >> tried bagels in about all 48 and NONE are even close to a real

    bagel...
    > >> NOT EVEN CLOSE... they are just nondescript rolls with a hole.

    And
    > >> even a perfect NYC bagel once it's been out of the oven more than

    60
    > >> minutes it's no longer a bagel... it's just a stale hunk of dough.

    And
    > >> there is no such thing as a frozen bagel (Lenders ain't any kind

    of
    > >> bagel), a NYC pigeon has to be starving to peck one, and even then
    > >> won't let it's neighbors see its pecker pecking. And so, unless

    yoose
    > >> come to NYC you can't have a bagel... and Staten Island doesn't

    count,
    > >> that's part of Noo Joisey anyways.

    > >
    > > Well, we Midwesterners don't mind slumming in the bagel department,
    > > because we don't know any better. I like whatever it is that is

    being
    > > presented as a bagel here. I like the plain ones, spread with

    cream
    > > cheese and sprinkled with Penzey's Sunny Paris. I'm not sure I'm
    > > qualified to use the word, "schmear." Heck, I don't even know if I

    can
    > > spell it!

    >
    > Over on the West Coast, we have our own versions of bagels. I've had

    the
    > crisp-doughy NYC tori that Sheldon seems to favor, and I prefer the

    bagels
    > here. (I lived in NYC in 1983-84. Maybe those were just bad years

    for NYC
    > bagels.)
    >
    > Gimme a toasted onion-sourdough bagel with avocado and alder-smoked

    salmon,
    > please... or a carrot-sesame bagel with hummus and a sprinkling of

    lemon
    > zest... or a pear-walnut bagel with some Humboldt Fog...
    >
    > Mmmmm....adrift in bagel-space....
    >
    > Bob


    Oy vey... only goyim toast bagels.
     
  14. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Sheldon wrote:

    > Oy vey... only goyim toast bagels.


    Voden? I should deny being goyische?

    Toasted bagels I like already.

    Bob
     
  15. "Sheldon" <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >Oy vey... only goyim toast bagels.


    Only goyim who have wide-slot toasters. Or who unplug the toaster and go
    after the toasted bagel with a knife.

    Carol
    --
    Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
     
  16. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Carol replied:

    >>Oy vey... only goyim toast bagels.

    >
    > Only goyim who have wide-slot toasters. Or who unplug the toaster and go
    > after the toasted bagel with a knife.


    I got two words for ya:

    Toaster. Oven.

    Now put those two words together, and step into a world where you can toast
    bagels or pita bread, you can melt cheese on top of sandwich fillings, you
    can easily caramelize sugar on banana slices, you can roast peppers
    routinely, you can cook bacon flawlessly...the possibilities are endless!

    Reuben sandwiches are EASY with a toaster oven. Bruschette are CHILD'S PLAY.

    I *like* my toaster oven!

    Bob
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>, Monsur Fromage du
    Pollet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > I can't speak for the entire population, but many folks drink skim
    > > or low-fat. I know of no adults (regular or not) who drink whole
    > > milk as a matter of course. I usually keep a small quantity on hand
    > > for cooking or for use in my coffee.


    > On the rare occassion I have milk in the house...it is whole milk...Skim
    > milk is for sissies. Don't you know me Barb? I'm the Defender of the
    > Noble Beet.


    Whatever floats your boat. I make soups with some whole milk, but drink
    skim.
    --
    -Barb, <http://www.jamlady.eboard.com> Arizona vacation pics added 3-24-05.
    "I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
    say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
    performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
     
  18. "Bob" <[email protected]_spammer.biz>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >I got two words for ya:
    >
    >Toaster. Oven.
    >
    >Now put those two words together, and step into a world where you can toast
    >bagels or pita bread, you can melt cheese on top of sandwich fillings, you
    >can easily caramelize sugar on banana slices, you can roast peppers
    >routinely, you can cook bacon flawlessly...the possibilities are endless!
    >
    >Reuben sandwiches are EASY with a toaster oven. Bruschette are CHILD'S PLAY.
    >
    >I *like* my toaster oven!


    I loved mine, too. No room in this kitchen, unfortunately. We have a
    microwave with a broiler unit, but I'm scared to try it.

    Carol
    --
    Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
     
  19. George

    George Guest

    Sheldon wrote:

    >
    > Unless they're purchased in NYC they ain't bagels, I'm serious... I've
    > tried bagels in about all 48 and NONE are even close to a real bagel...
    > NOT EVEN CLOSE... they are just nondescript rolls with a hole. And
    > even a perfect NYC bagel once it's been out of the oven more than 60
    > minutes it's no longer a bagel... it's just a stale hunk of dough. And
    > there is no such thing as a frozen bagel (Lenders ain't any kind of
    > bagel), a NYC pigeon has to be starving to peck one, and even then
    > won't let it's neighbors see its pecker pecking. And so, unless yoose
    > come to NYC you can't have a bagel... and Staten Island doesn't count,
    > that's part of Noo Joisey anyways.
    >
    > Sheldon
    >


    They are there if you know where to look...

    I live 2 hours from NYC. We have 2 Jewish bakeries here that are now
    operated by the third generation of families that migrated from
    Brooklyn. They are located in what used to be the bustling core areas of
    cities 60 or 70 years ago. They make traditional boiled bagels just like
    you find in NYC. If you happened to be driving thru the area and
    didn't know about them you would never see them.

    We also have a very good selection of *real* pizza here. Both Pizza hut
    and Dominoes thru in the towel in recent years and closed their local
    stores. This is a close place to settle if you wanted to move your
    business from NYC or for the many people who immigrated to NYC,
    perfected their skills and wanted to move on and open a business.

    I used to work for a local company. We frequently had visitors in for
    acceptance tests or training and would take them out for dinner each
    night. One night would always be pizza night. Everyone raved about the
    quality of the pizza and how they never had anything that good.
     
  20. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    SteveR wrote:
    > Curly Sue <[email protected]> writes:
    >> On Sun, 27 Mar 2005 13:33:47 +0100, SteveR
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > [snip]
    >
    > Speaking of customs, when you have a cup of tea, do you in America put
    > the milk in first and then the tea, or the tea in first and the milk
    > in afterwards? (Note that this is a sort of religious question in
    > this country...)


    This isn't a USian thing. It depends on the person. I put the cream in the
    cup first and then add the hot tea.

    Jill
     
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