Re: Looking for suggestions for healthy meals

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Melba's Jammin', Mar 26, 2005.

  1. Serene

    Serene Guest

    SteveR <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Speaking of customs, when you have a cup of tea, do you in America put
    > the milk in first and then the tea, or the tea in first and the milk in
    > afterwards? (Note that this is a sort of religious question in this
    > country...)


    Warm the pot, add the leaves, add the boiling water, steep, strain into
    a cup, *then* add milk and sugar.

    serene, definitely tea first
    --
    http://serenejournal.livejournal.com
    http://www.jhuger.com
     


  2. Serene

    Serene Guest

  3. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Sheldon wrote:
    > Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
    >> Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]>, if that's their real
    >> name, wrote:
    >>
    >>> Grocery store bagels I know about are about 4" diameter
    >>> and maybe an inch thick. And just because they are available with
    >>> all sorts of stuff in them doesn't mean I eat them. I'm not fond
    >>> of gacky sweet bagels, so I only have plain - or else the ones with
    >>> the savory seeds on top. My husband likes the cinnamon raisin ones.

    >>
    >> Onion bagels are my favorites, although I seldom buy them anymore.
    >> Onion bagels with lots of melted butter. :)
    >>
    >> Carol

    >
    > Unless they're purchased in NYC they ain't bagels, I'm serious... I've
    > tried bagels in about all 48
    > Sheldon


    Sheldon - last time I checked there were 50 states. Did you stop just short
    of Alaska? ;) And have you ever attempted to make bagels at home? I'm
    pretty sure someone was doing that before they started hawking them on the
    streets and shops of NYC.

    Jill <--loves crispy sliced bagel chips, lots of butter and garlic
     
  4. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Sheldon wrote:
    > Bob wrote:
    >> Carol replied to Sheldon:
    >>
    >>>> Unless they're purchased in NYC they ain't bagels, I'm serious...
    >>>> I've tried bagels in about all 48 and NONE are even close to a
    >>>> real bagel... NOT EVEN CLOSE... they are just nondescript rolls
    >>>> with a hole. And even a perfect NYC bagel once it's been out of
    >>>> the oven more than 60 minutes it's no longer a bagel... it's just
    >>>> a stale hunk of dough.

    > And
    >>>> there is no such thing as a frozen bagel (Lenders ain't any kind of
    >>>> bagel), a NYC pigeon has to be starving to peck one, and even then
    >>>> won't let it's neighbors see its pecker pecking. And so, unless
    >>>> yoose come to NYC you can't have a bagel... and Staten Island
    >>>> doesn't count, that's part of Noo Joisey anyways.
    >>>
    >>> Well, we Midwesterners don't mind slumming in the bagel department,
    >>> because we don't know any better. I like whatever it is that is
    >>> being presented as a bagel here. I like the plain ones, spread
    >>> with cream cheese and sprinkled with Penzey's Sunny Paris. I'm not
    >>> sure I'm qualified to use the word, "schmear." Heck, I don't even
    >>> know if I can spell it!

    >>
    >> Over on the West Coast, we have our own versions of bagels. I've had
    >> the crisp-doughy NYC tori that Sheldon seems to favor, and I prefer
    >> the bagels here. (I lived in NYC in 1983-84. Maybe those were just
    >> bad years for NYC bagels.)
    >>
    >> Gimme a toasted onion-sourdough bagel with avocado and alder-smoked
    >> salmon, please... or a carrot-sesame bagel with hummus and a
    >> sprinkling of lemon zest... or a pear-walnut bagel with some
    >> Humboldt Fog...
    >>
    >> Mmmmm....adrift in bagel-space....
    >>
    >> Bob

    >
    > Oy vey... only goyim toast bagels.


    Bagels aren't all that. Boiled then baked hunks of dense, chewy, tough
    dough (yeah, I had one in NYC). Sorry, not a fan of bagels unless they are
    the crispy baked bagel chips.

    Jill
     
  5. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Sheldon wrote:

    >
    > Unless they're purchased in NYC they ain't bagels, I'm serious... I've
    > tried bagels in about all 48 and NONE are even close to a real bagel...
    > NOT EVEN CLOSE... they are just nondescript rolls with a hole. And
    > even a perfect NYC bagel once it's been out of the oven more than 60
    > minutes it's no longer a bagel... it's just a stale hunk of dough. And
    > there is no such thing as a frozen bagel (Lenders ain't any kind of
    > bagel), a NYC pigeon has to be starving to peck one, and even then
    > won't let it's neighbors see its pecker pecking. And so, unless yoose
    > come to NYC you can't have a bagel... and Staten Island doesn't count,
    > that's part of Noo Joisey anyways.


    Montreal bagels are pretty good too. There are a lot of places that sell
    these round things with holes in the middle, and being shaped like a bagel
    is enough for some people to think there are bagels, but that is where the
    similarity ends.
     
  6. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote
    > Sheldon wrote:


    >> Unless they're purchased in NYC they ain't bagels, I'm serious... I've
    >> tried bagels in about all 48
    >> Sheldon

    >
    > Sheldon - last time I checked there were 50 states. Did you stop just
    > short
    > of Alaska? ;) And have you ever attempted to make bagels at home? I'm
    > pretty sure someone was doing that before they started hawking them on the
    > streets and shops of NYC.


    It's true. Nothing like the pizza and bagels in NYC. I don't even live
    that far away, and I can get pretty good bagels and pizza, but not the
    real deal.

    nancy
     
  7. AlleyGator

    AlleyGator Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Sheldon - last time I checked there were 50 states. Did you stop just short
    >of Alaska? ;) And have you ever attempted to make bagels at home? I'm
    >pretty sure someone was doing that before they started hawking them on the
    >streets and shops of NYC.

    I saw an old "Baking with Julia" show where they made bagels at home.
    Not for me, thank you. I'll travel to St. Louis Bread Company for a
    6-inch wide Asiago cheese bagel, though. Or stop at a market and buy
    a shriveled up imitation "whole grain bagel" before I would ever try
    to make them.
     
  8. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:
    > Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
    > >
    > > Onion bagels are my favorites, although I seldom buy them anymore.
    > > Onion bagels with lots of melted butter. :)
    > >
    > > Carol
    > >

    >
    > Poppy Seed with smoked salmon cream cheese were my delight.


    I've never seen "smoked salmon cream cheese", only *lox* cream
    cheese... smoked salmon implies 'hot smoked' salmon... often made into
    "smoked salmon salad" at NYC bagel shops, but never blended with cream
    cheese.

    Sheldon
     
  9. aem

    aem Guest

    Sheldon wrote:
    >
    > I've never seen "smoked salmon cream cheese", only *lox* cream
    > cheese... smoked salmon implies 'hot smoked' salmon... often made
    > into "smoked salmon salad" at NYC bagel shops, but never blended with

    cream
    > cheese.


    You'd find it at my house because we like the hot smoked more than the
    lox or nova type. Hot smoked salmon (Portlock brand from TJ's) on top
    of, not mixed with, cream cheese. But we're eating it on crackers
    (stoned wheat thins or original Triscuits) because as you said we don't
    get good bagels here. What we get is just fat bread, so we only get
    bagels in NYC or Philly. I have, however, previously posted a smoked
    salmon spread, which could be used on real bagels. -aem
     
  10. "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >
    > Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:
    > > Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
    > > >
    > > > Onion bagels are my favorites, although I seldom buy them anymore.
    > > > Onion bagels with lots of melted butter. :)
    > > >
    > > > Carol
    > > >

    > >
    > > Poppy Seed with smoked salmon cream cheese were my delight.

    >
    > I've never seen "smoked salmon cream cheese", only *lox* cream
    > cheese... smoked salmon implies 'hot smoked' salmon... often made into
    > "smoked salmon salad" at NYC bagel shops, but never blended with cream
    > cheese.
    >
    > Sheldon
    >
    >


    Just since you've never seen it, doesn't mean it doesn't exsist. It is in
    most of the supermarket dairy cases up here; near the chip dips. Now I
    wouldn't call it gourmet dinning but it is nice on bagels. I have never
    looked at the ingredient list...it is probably all totally fake
    chemicals.

    --
    No Bread Crumbs were hurt in the making of this Meal.
    Type 2 Diabetic 1AC 7.3, 5.5, 5.6 mmol
    Continuing to be Manitoban
     
  11. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Monsur Fromage du Pollet wrote:

    >
    > > I've never seen "smoked salmon cream cheese", only *lox* cream
    > > cheese... smoked salmon implies 'hot smoked' salmon... often made into
    > > "smoked salmon salad" at NYC bagel shops, but never blended with cream
    > > cheese.
    > >
    > > Sheldon
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Just since you've never seen it, doesn't mean it doesn't exsist. It is in
    > most of the supermarket dairy cases up here; near the chip dips. Now I
    > wouldn't call it gourmet dinning but it is nice on bagels. I have never
    > looked at the ingredient list...it is probably all totally fake
    > chemicals.


    If it is outside of his some realm of existence it doesn't exist.
    Around here, smoked salmon usual means a lox type salmon, lightly cold
    smoked. Perhaps it is called lox in Jewish delis, but I don't know of any of
    them around here. If I go to the store or fish counter and ask for smoked
    salmon, I get lox. Once in a while they have some hot smoked salmon, but the
    long and short of it is that if something is being sold as smoked salmon, you
    can count on it being cold smoked (lox). If you ask for smoked salmon
    expecting to get hot smoked, you are guaranteed to be disappointed. This is
    just one more example of our things in Sheldon's little world are different
    from things in the real world.
     
  12. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    Serene wrote:
    >
    > SteveR <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Speaking of customs, when you have a cup of tea, do you in America put
    > > the milk in first and then the tea, or the tea in first and the milk in
    > > afterwards? (Note that this is a sort of religious question in this
    > > country...)

    >
    > Warm the pot, add the leaves, add the boiling water, steep, strain into
    > a cup, *then* add milk and sugar.
    >
    > serene, definitely tea first


    ROTFL! He meant when pouring out the made tea into the cup. There are
    people who claim they can taste the difference. But so far no one who
    claims that has done better than random when I've tested them :)



    > --
    > http://serenejournal.livejournal.com
    > http://www.jhuger.com
     
  13. Serene

    Serene Guest

    Arri London <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Serene wrote:
    > >
    > > SteveR <[email protected]randfathersaxe.demon.co.uk> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Speaking of customs, when you have a cup of tea, do you in America put
    > > > the milk in first and then the tea, or the tea in first and the milk in
    > > > afterwards? (Note that this is a sort of religious question in this
    > > > country...)

    > >
    > > Warm the pot, add the leaves, add the boiling water, steep, strain into
    > > a cup, *then* add milk and sugar.
    > >
    > > serene, definitely tea first

    >
    > ROTFL! He meant when pouring out the made tea into the cup.


    Yes, I know. I was being wordy. It's a gift.

    serene
    --
    http://serenejournal.livejournal.com
    http://www.jhuger.com
     
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