Re: Nocturnal low blood pressure -> GERD?

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by William A. Noyes, Aug 5, 2003.

  1. I mix the comments in with yours.

    "Brian Sandle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I had CABG a couple of years ago.
    >Waiting for it I was put on beta
    > blockers and noticed a bit of burning in the upper chest. Apparently some
    > people get that.
    >
    > A few times since the CABG I have been having chest discomfort. A small
    > artery was not bypassed in the CABG, but I do not show any cardio enzymes.
    >
    > Before the heart attack I had been taking 3 grams of fish oil daily. While
    > waiting for CABG in hospital I changed that to 1 gram. That resulted in
    > less chest discomfort when walking a bit.


    Fatty foods lend to acid reflux. People often complain about
    meat stews and peanut butter as two examples that come to
    mind.

    >
    > I had used fish for many years and it had controlled my blood pressure to
    > about 120/80.
    >
    > 23.75 mg of metoprolol daily had kept my blood pressure at about 107/70
    > measured at home. At the doctor's it was rather higher. Recently, getting
    > some discomfort I measured it again and it was about 100/65, perhaps going
    > even lower. Lying down had not been good. At the doctor's it was 110/70
    > and she suggests keeping on the metoprolol in case there is heart trouble.
    >
    > Today at home mu blood pressure it is down again and I got quite a pain
    > when lying down (waiting to go for cholesterol check).
    >
    > But is rather low blood pressure going to cause lack of strength in the
    > esohpageal sphincter? Could the pain from beta blocker be that?
    >
    > The nocturnal blood pressure is lower - is that part of GERD?


    This I doubt but I am not a medical man.

    >
    > Is nocturnal asthma to do with nocturnal GERD?


    This what is called microaspiration. The "refluxed" acid get into the
    lung which causes a spasm. It also cause inflamation and acid burn damage.


    > I not that beta blockers
    > (not so much metoprolol) are warned against with asthma sometimes. But
    > would GERD be any part of that in some cases?


    AFAIK, this is a reasonable hypothesis to consider.
    But acid reflux is a common disorder in the
    middle aged and the old so perhaps it is just one more
    thing getting old and failing.

    Hopefully you'll get a much better answer than I provided.
     
    Tags:


  2. Mooshie peas

    Mooshie peas Guest

    On 9 Aug 2003 16:59:16 -0500, Brian Sandle
    <[email protected]> posted:

    >In sci.med.cardiology Moosh:} <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Tue, 5 Aug 2003 21:58:30 -0700, "William A. Noyes"
    >> <[email protected]> posted:

    >
    >>>I mix the comments in with yours.

    >
    >> Me too :)

    >
    >>>"Brian Sandle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:[email protected]
    >>>> I had CABG a couple of years ago.
    >>>>Waiting for it I was put on beta
    >>>> blockers and noticed a bit of burning in the upper chest. Apparently some
    >>>> people get that.
    >>>>
    >>>> A few times since the CABG I have been having chest discomfort. A small
    >>>> artery was not bypassed in the CABG, but I do not show any cardio enzymes.
    >>>>
    >>>> Before the heart attack I had been taking 3 grams of fish oil daily. While
    >>>> waiting for CABG in hospital I changed that to 1 gram. That resulted in
    >>>> less chest discomfort when walking a bit.
    >>>
    >>>Fatty foods lend to acid reflux. People often complain about
    >>>meat stews and peanut butter as two examples that come to
    >>>mind.

    >
    >> And onions, and dried fruit, and bananas.....
    >> My meat stew is not fatty. I've heard fruit cake is a common cause.

    >
    >Those foods are on lists of tyramine-containing foods. They increase
    >blood pressure for some people. Perhaps a change in blood pressure
    >may trigger something, greater or lesser.


    Overripe bananas perhaps, but then its underripe bananas which have
    caused dyspepsia in the folks I've known. I suspect it is just an
    idiosyncratic reaction to odd foods.

    >>>> I had used fish

    >
    >sorry, `fish oil' I meant.
    >
    > for many years and it had controlled my blood pressure to
    >>>> about 120/80.
    >>>>
    >>>> 23.75 mg of metoprolol daily had kept my blood pressure at about 107/70
    >>>> measured at home. At the doctor's it was rather higher. Recently, getting
    >>>> some discomfort I measured it again and it was about 100/65, perhaps going
    >>>> even lower. Lying down had not been good. At the doctor's it was 110/70
    >>>> and she suggests keeping on the metoprolol in case there is heart trouble.
    >>>>
    >>>> Today at home mu blood pressure it is down again and I got quite a pain
    >>>> when lying down (waiting to go for cholesterol check).
    >>>>
    >>>> But is rather low blood pressure going to cause lack of strength in the
    >>>> esohpageal sphincter? Could the pain from beta blocker be that?
    >>>>
    >>>> The nocturnal blood pressure is lower - is that part of GERD?
    >>>
    >>>This I doubt but I am not a medical man.

    >
    >So why does it happen at night?
    >
    >Does lying on the left side help, since the openings to the
    >stomach are on the right side - gravity?


    Only one opening controlled by a sphyncter.

    >I think some acid is meant to come into the oesophagus to disinfect
    >any bacterial residue from food.


    Nope. The oesophagus can cope, but it is certainly not a recommended
    occurrences.

    >>>> Is nocturnal asthma to do with nocturnal GERD?
    >>>
    >>>This what is called microaspiration. The "refluxed" acid get into the
    >>>lung which causes a spasm. It also cause inflamation and acid burn damage.

    >
    >> In my experience (rare) it causes a violent coughing fit.

    >
    >With asthma it might just be from the vapour of burping?
    >
    >Sometimes just little things can trigger trouble. It's probably just
    >coincidence by my trouble coincided with my use of a rather
    >vibratory electric razor for a week or so - started after a few days
    >of use. People who use strongly vibrating tools can get destruction
    >of the capilliaries in their fingers.


    Is that capiliiaries or nerves? "Dead hand" is s common problem.
    I wonder if you might have been getting some ozone from the razor.

    >Does vibration affect
    >endothelin production or something? I had not been using so much
    >heat either, and cold can increase endothelin.
    >
    >And I wondered about electromagnetic stress which some get, and
    >addition of several stresses.


    Electromagnetic radiation appears to do little more than heat the area
    that absorbs it, below a certain damagingly short wavelength.
     
Loading...