Re: Optimal temperature for a Time Trial

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by big D, Feb 14, 2005.

  1. big D

    big D Guest

    Dear Art,

    Your statement is absolutely correct and quite insightful. Air density
    is, indeed, inversely proportional to temperature. In other words, on a
    hot day, air around you will be less dense, hence offer less
    resistance.

    I don't know where you live, but I live in Texas. I suggest that, if at
    all possible, you come down here for your time trial in July or August
    when it's 100+ F (95 at least) and you should be really happy with the
    results. Or, better yet, do it in Arizona where it's even hotter (might
    get lucky and get to do it when it's 115 F) and dry (Texas humidity
    might add to the air resistance.) Oh, my, I almost forgot about Death
    Valley! Do they do time trials there?

    Best o'luck!

    Dan
     
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  2. Peter

    Peter Guest

    big D wrote:

    > Your statement is absolutely correct and quite insightful. Air density
    > is, indeed, inversely proportional to temperature. In other words, on a
    > hot day, air around you will be less dense, hence offer less
    > resistance.
    >
    > I don't know where you live, but I live in Texas. I suggest that, if at
    > all possible, you come down here for your time trial in July or August
    > when it's 100+ F (95 at least) and you should be really happy with the
    > results. Or, better yet, do it in Arizona where it's even hotter (might
    > get lucky and get to do it when it's 115 F) and dry (Texas humidity
    > might add to the air resistance.)


    No, water vapor (molecular weight 18) reduces the density of the air
    (average molecular weight about 29) and therefore creates less air
    resistance than you would have with completely dry air. This assumes
    you don't have condensation (fog).

    > Oh, my, I almost forgot about Death
    > Valley! Do they do time trials there?


    The relatively low elevation in much of that area would not be
    favorable for reduced air resistance.
    >
    > Best o'luck!


    Of course physiological factors may result in your power output
    not being at its peak on particularly hot and humid days.
     
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