Re: Prolink actually stays, or chain tension doesn't allow squeak?



T

Tim McNamara

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Phil, Non-Squid" <[email protected]> wrote:

> I used Prolink on my beater chain about 5 months ago. I've ridden it
> on short 1/2 mile trips on a daily basis, with a couple of wet rides.
> I haven't maintained it at all because my current job has distracts
> me from my interest in bikes, and the entire set of inner and outer
> plates is a nasty dry-rust mess at this point. However, there's no
> chain squeak. This is a SS with decently high tension on the chain.
> I also don't notice any dry chain roller "rattle."
>
> Is there no squeak because of the chain tension, or is it because the
> Prolink has actually maintained its lubricating properties?


http://www.progoldmfr.com/products/prolink.html

Prolink claims to be a "metal conditioner" using "MFR technology."
Whatever the hell that is.

http://www.progoldmfr.com/products/MFRconc.html

"Not to be confused with ordinary "additives," ProGold MFR Concentrate
is a scientifically blended petroleum-based formula designed to blend
with motor oils, gear oils and other lubricants, either natural
hydrocarbon or synthetic. It coats internal metal surfaces with a
polarized layer of oil molecules to resist extreme pressure and
excessive temperature in industrial and automotive applications such as
internal combustion and diesel engines, automatic and manual
transmissions, differentials, gear boxes, mining and smelting equipment,
machine tools, air compressors, pumps, generators, bearings and bearing
journals. Contains no plastic particles, PTFE resins, molybdenum
disulfide, or any other solids which may cause harmful buildup."

They don't identify what "MFR" is. Searching the Web for "MFR" and
things like "lubricant" and "tribology" was not all that helpful.
Nothing turned up at www.uspto.com but then since I don't know what "MFR
technology" stands for that might be a limiter. One definition of "MFR"
was "Melt Flow Rate." Another was "Melamine-Formaldehyde Resin:"

http://meetings.aps.org/Meeting/TSF06/Event/55993

http://www.chamotlabs.com/ApplicationNotes/HTC/HTC34thMidwest.html

Note that ProLink is part of the "ProGold" family of products, which
have those wonderful commercials where they add their product to the oil
in an engine, then drain the oil out of the engine and leave it running
while all the other engines using plain motor oil rapidly overheat and
seize.

http://www.progoldmfr.com/products/enginetrmt.html

It looks suspiciously like oleus serpentus to me. However, that said,
I've got a bottle of ProLink and it works fine on my chains. I get
300-400 miles between applications. The chain seems to be slightly less
of a dust and dirt magnet than is the case motor oil and it seems to dry
a bit more. It seems to hold up in the rain fairly well but no better
than motor oil.

Most of the breathless claims on the ProLink page of ProGold's Web site
are hooey, though. It's not a dry lube, it does attract dirt to an
extent, I've seen no sign of it cleaning as I ride, etc.
 
On Wed, 20 Dec 2006 17:30:38 -0600, Tim McNamara
<[email protected]> wrote:

[snip]

>They don't identify what "MFR" is. Searching the Web for "MFR" and
>things like "lubricant" and "tribology" was not all that helpful.
>Nothing turned up at www.uspto.com but then since I don't know what "MFR
>technology" stands for that might be a limiter. One definition of "MFR"
>was "Melt Flow Rate." Another was "Melamine-Formaldehyde Resin:"


[snip]

Dear Tim,

"MFR technology" is just a silly marketing acronym for "metal friction
reducer technology":

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&as_qdr=all&q=mfr+"metal+friction+reducer"

Cheers,

Carl Fogel
 
M

Mark

Guest
Tim McNamara wrote:

> http://www.progoldmfr.com/products/enginetrmt.html
>
> It looks suspiciously like oleus serpentus to me. However, that said,
> I've got a bottle of ProLink and it works fine on my chains. I get
> 300-400 miles between applications. The chain seems to be slightly less
> of a dust and dirt magnet than is the case motor oil and it seems to dry
> a bit more. It seems to hold up in the rain fairly well but no better
> than motor oil.
> Most of the breathless claims on the ProLink page of ProGold's Web site
> are hooey, though. It's not a dry lube, it does attract dirt to an
> extent, I've seen no sign of it cleaning as I ride, etc.


After trying a bunch of chain lubricants, I've settled on ProLink as a
good compromise - attracts crud less than triflow or similar oils, lasts
a whole lot longer than the wax-based lubricants I tried.

That said, I agree that the "MFR" blather is overdone.

Mark J.
 
P

Patrick Lamb

Guest
On Wed, 20 Dec 2006 17:30:38 -0600, Tim McNamara
<[email protected]> wrote:
>
>Prolink claims to be a "metal conditioner" using "MFR technology."
>Whatever the hell that is.
>
>It looks suspiciously like oleus serpentus to me.


Yeah, it really sounds like long aliphatic chain hydrocarbons derived
from organically grown reptilian sources.

> However, that said,
>I've got a bottle of ProLink and it works fine on my chains. I get
>300-400 miles between applications. The chain seems to be slightly less
>of a dust and dirt magnet than is the case motor oil and it seems to dry
>a bit more. It seems to hold up in the rain fairly well but no better
>than motor oil.


While using Prolink, I had to run some real oil over the chain every
few weeks to keep it from rusting, which made the spectacular black
mess for the next few weeks.

>Most of the breathless claims on the ProLink page of ProGold's Web site
>are hooey, though. It's not a dry lube, it does attract dirt to an
>extent, I've seen no sign of it cleaning as I ride, etc.


My preference is to get all the possible maintenance done at once. Am
I the only person who comes back from a ride and wants to go get a
drink inside an air conditioned house, instead of puttering around
lubing a chain, which I then need to spend a few minutes wiping off
before the next ride? (Half this gripe applies to store-bought
homebrew, aka WL.)

Pat

Email address works as is.
 
P

Patrick Lamb

Guest
On Wed, 20 Dec 2006 17:45:46 -0700, [email protected] wrote:
>On Wed, 20 Dec 2006 17:30:38 -0600, Tim McNamara
><[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>They don't identify what "MFR" is. Searching the Web for "MFR" and
>>things like "lubricant" and "tribology" was not all that helpful.
>>Nothing turned up at www.uspto.com but then since I don't know what "MFR
>>technology" stands for that might be a limiter. One definition of "MFR"
>>was "Melt Flow Rate." Another was "Melamine-Formaldehyde Resin:"

>
>"MFR technology" is just a silly marketing acronym for "metal friction
>reducer technology":


Would a translation into something resembling English read, "Technical
meaning replaced by marketing babble "?

Pat

Email address works as is.
 
T

Tim McNamara

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Patrick Lamb <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Wed, 20 Dec 2006 17:45:46 -0700, [email protected] wrote:
> >On Wed, 20 Dec 2006 17:30:38 -0600, Tim McNamara
> ><[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> >>They don't identify what "MFR" is. Searching the Web for "MFR" and
> >>things like "lubricant" and "tribology" was not all that helpful.
> >>Nothing turned up at www.uspto.com but then since I don't know what "MFR
> >>technology" stands for that might be a limiter. One definition of "MFR"
> >>was "Melt Flow Rate." Another was "Melamine-Formaldehyde Resin:"

> >
> >"MFR technology" is just a silly marketing acronym for "metal friction
> >reducer technology":

>
> Would a translation into something resembling English read, "Technical
> meaning replaced by marketing babble "?


I think probably just "marketing babble." I'm not at all sure that
there was "technical meaning" in the first place. Oh well, it is a
decent product in terms of how it works.
 
M

Mark

Guest
Tim McNamara wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> Patrick Lamb <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>>On Wed, 20 Dec 2006 17:45:46 -0700, [email protected] wrote:
>>
>>>On Wed, 20 Dec 2006 17:30:38 -0600, Tim McNamara
>>><[email protected]> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>They don't identify what "MFR" is. Searching the Web for "MFR" and
>>>>things like "lubricant" and "tribology" was not all that helpful.
>>>>Nothing turned up at www.uspto.com but then since I don't know what "MFR
>>>>technology" stands for that might be a limiter. One definition of "MFR"
>>>>was "Melt Flow Rate." Another was "Melamine-Formaldehyde Resin:"
>>>
>>>"MFR technology" is just a silly marketing acronym for "metal friction
>>>reducer technology":

>>
>>Would a translation into something resembling English read, "Technical
>>meaning replaced by marketing babble "?

>
>
> I think probably just "marketing babble." I'm not at all sure that
> there was "technical meaning" in the first place. Oh well, it is a
> decent product in terms of how it works.


I read somewhere that the producers of "Star Trek - Next Generation"
wanted to sound good scientifically, so they hired a science/tech guy to
doctor their scripts. The scriptwriters literally wrote things like
"Captain! The tech-ity tech tech is about to tech" and the science guy
would fill in something that sounded good.

Maybe prolink does it the other way around - the technical people write
stuff like "Markety mark mark makes Prolink very effective" and the
marketing people fill in with things like "MFR".

Mark J.