Re: Reality Check - What can a 47 y/o expect?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Chris Malcolm, Feb 6, 2005.

  1. Bob MacWilliam <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Keith Hobman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> In article <[email protected]>, "Dean" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:


    >>> Having said that, here's my question. I'm a 47 y/o male in above average
    >>> but
    >>> not great shape. (6' - 190 lbs, bf estimated @ 18%)I've worked out on and
    >>> off with a home gym but just joined a gym October 1st. I'm currently
    >>> doing
    >>> a 3rd week (10 rep) MWF Hst routine and a T,Th mixed cardio routine for
    >>> about
    >>> 40 minutes. Sometimes I'll run for 2.5 miles on Sunday. I'm eating
    >>> sensibly
    >>> and plan to monitor my protien carbs fat etc for fine tuning in the near
    >>> future. If I continue this for 3 years (50 yoa) what results can I expect
    >>> given my age? Is Hst a good idea for a 47 y/o or should I leave that to
    >>> the
    >>> young bucks? I'd like to lower the bf then try bulking by backing off the
    >>> cardio. Is it likely I'll be able to gain muscle mass at my age?


    >> Depends. On how much muscle you curently have, how good your diet is,
    >> drugs, etc. I'm the same age and I have to admit muscle mass isn't my
    >> goal. Which brings me to my point.
    >>
    >> I don't think the idea "I'll do this and see what happens." is a good one
    >> in terms of performance. I think you realistically need to have goals and
    >> then work towards achieving those goals within a time-line. I have both
    >> short-term and long-term goals and that is what fuels me to work. My goals
    >> are performance oriented, not appearance oriented - but even so I'd like
    >> to compete in OL in the 94 kg class so there is motivation there as well.
    >>
    >> So I don't think you can get anywhere by having other tell you what you
    >> can expect by age 50. I think you have to decide what you want by age 50
    >> and then put together a plan to achieve it.


    > As far as HST goes, the progression can be as moderate or as aggressive as
    > you desire. I would suggest you progress fairly aggressively as long as you
    > stay relatively injury-free. Science says you can gain muscle mass at any
    > age. The core concepts of HST applies to any age IMHO.


    Well, I'm 62, with a slightly dicky heart which limits my capacity for
    aerobic exercise. For at least the last 20 years I've been pretty
    sedentary, and now, having retired, I'm putting together an exercise
    programme. I decided to find out what the old muscles were capable of
    by experiment, and decided to start with pullups. To begin with I
    couldn't do a single one, all I could do was hang and twitch.

    My experimental routine was simply to do a single session of as many
    as I could, i.e. to failure, and to do this at widely varying
    intervals, sometimes just an hour after the last trial, sometimes two
    weeks, in order to gather as much data as possible about how the
    muscles behaved.

    It became clear after a few months that the rapid gains came from
    doing my pullups to failure every day until my reps dropped more than
    about 20%, at which point I'd pause for a day or two.

    It recently became clear that even more rapid gains came from doing
    them twice a day, until they began to fall off, when I'd pause for a
    day or two.

    I've now got up to 5, and it looks like I'm now gaining reps at about
    10% per week.

    Forty years ago and a lot lighter I was able to do a one arm pull up
    on a good day with a following wind with the right arm only, the
    result of lots of teenage tree climbing. I've read that once you get
    past 25 pullups you ought to able to have a go at a single one arm
    pullup. So I've set myself the goal of doing that in three months.

    I may well fail, but I'll learn from the failure what will be a more
    realistic schedule, and what will be an optimal training schedule. I'm
    assuming that what I learn from these pullups I'll then be able to
    translate into a personalised optimal schedule for other muscles.

    The idea behind my deliberately rather variable schedule is to collect
    enough data to parameterise a model of my muscle training response. So
    far I need four contributory functions, two negative and two
    positive. The two negative functions I call fatigue and
    strain. Fatigue has a half life of two hours, and strain has a half
    life of three days. Then there are two positive functions, which I
    call training and growth. Training has a half life of around a
    fortnight, and I haven't yet got enough data to settle down growth,
    but it looks like its half life will be in terms of years. I
    parameterise these functions in terms of amount of contribution and
    half life by hill climbing to minimise least squared errors.

    Once I have a good parameterisation I'll be able to use the
    spreadsheet to perform virtual exercise experiments with different
    training regimes and devise what's optimum for my particular
    muscles. I can also keep track of how they change as they develop, and
    adapt my programmes accordingly.

    Now that I've checked through this newsgroup and some web sites it
    looks as though what I've done is re-invent a form of HST. I'm
    pleasantly surprised to see that these 62 year old muscles have still
    got plenty of adaptive life left in them.

    As far as the rest of the old body is concerned, I can still, just, do
    one single one-legged deep squat on each leg, so the legs and knees
    are not too bad. I'll be limited with what I can do with bigger
    muscles by the fact that I'll probably have to keep my heart under
    135bpm, at least initially. That can still get me up a big steep hill
    at a constant slow plodding pace.

    So, my current aim is a one arm pullup with both arms by April 31st,
    currently being able to do 5 two-arm pullups. My arms will then be
    stronger than at any time in my previous life, and if they prove able
    to do that, why not the rest?

    --
    Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
    IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
     
    Tags:


  2. Proton Soup

    Proton Soup Guest

    On 7 Feb 2005 03:17:08 GMT, Chris Malcolm <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Now that I've checked through this newsgroup and some web sites it
    >looks as though what I've done is re-invent a form of HST. I'm
    >pleasantly surprised to see that these 62 year old muscles have still
    >got plenty of adaptive life left in them.
    >
    >As far as the rest of the old body is concerned, I can still, just, do
    >one single one-legged deep squat on each leg, so the legs and knees
    >are not too bad. I'll be limited with what I can do with bigger
    >muscles by the fact that I'll probably have to keep my heart under
    >135bpm, at least initially. That can still get me up a big steep hill
    >at a constant slow plodding pace.
    >
    >So, my current aim is a one arm pullup with both arms by April 31st,
    >currently being able to do 5 two-arm pullups. My arms will then be
    >stronger than at any time in my previous life, and if they prove able
    >to do that, why not the rest?
    >
    >--
    >Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
    >IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    >[http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]


    If you succeed, I'm not sure you'll have proved much more than you
    have excellent genetics. Still, the mis-spelling in your email
    address is funny as hell in the context of your post. :D

    -----------
    Proton Soup

    "Thanks for noticing that I didn't actually say anything." - Mike Lane
     
  3. Proton Soup <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 7 Feb 2005 03:17:08 GMT, Chris Malcolm <[email protected]>
    > wrote:


    >>Now that I've checked through this newsgroup and some web sites it
    >>looks as though what I've done is re-invent a form of HST. I'm
    >>pleasantly surprised to see that these 62 year old muscles have still
    >>got plenty of adaptive life left in them.
    >>
    >>As far as the rest of the old body is concerned, I can still, just, do
    >>one single one-legged deep squat on each leg, so the legs and knees
    >>are not too bad. I'll be limited with what I can do with bigger
    >>muscles by the fact that I'll probably have to keep my heart under
    >>135bpm, at least initially. That can still get me up a big steep hill
    >>at a constant slow plodding pace.
    >>
    >>So, my current aim is a one arm pullup with both arms by April 31st,
    >>currently being able to do 5 two-arm pullups. My arms will then be
    >>stronger than at any time in my previous life, and if they prove able
    >>to do that, why not the rest?


    > If you succeed, I'm not sure you'll have proved much more than you
    > have excellent genetics.


    Not sure about that. There's nobody remotely athletic on either side
    of my family. For the first 15 years of my life I was widely and
    correctly regarded as a puny weakling. I managed to avoid all gym and
    athletics at school by getting asthmatic sick notes, because the gym
    teachers selected me as the weakling to humiliate and mock publicly as
    a bad example in order to motivate the others.

    In the end I developed some wiry strength by spending a lot of my time
    on a bicycle or up a tree, but I was always very skinny. I suspect
    that means that I'm genetically disinclined to put on much muscle
    mass.

    It is already clear to me, knowing what I have experimentally
    discovered about my own muscles' behaviour, that if I had simply
    bought some random glossy fitness training book off the shelf and
    followed its advice I would have made rather slow progress and
    eventually got stuck in a plateau, and everyone would have told me
    "what can you expect at your age".

    Just for the record I'm 5'7" and weigh 145 lbs. My doc tells me I'm at
    a good weight, but I tell him he's hypnotised by averages and what I
    really am is an overweight skinny man who ought to lose at least 15lb
    of flab. I recently discovered I was diabetic and since adjusting my
    diet (e.g. no bread, no potatoes) I've started losing about 1lb a
    month.

    Despite my sedentary life for the last few decades I've managed to
    retain a residual level of fitness by refusing to own a car. If I'd
    bought a car I know I personally wouldn't have been able to resist the
    temptation to travel around on my bum instead of my feet.

    --
    Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
    IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
     
  4. Proton Soup

    Proton Soup Guest

    On 7 Feb 2005 10:46:36 GMT, Chris Malcolm <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Proton Soup <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On 7 Feb 2005 03:17:08 GMT, Chris Malcolm <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:

    >
    >>>Now that I've checked through this newsgroup and some web sites it
    >>>looks as though what I've done is re-invent a form of HST. I'm
    >>>pleasantly surprised to see that these 62 year old muscles have still
    >>>got plenty of adaptive life left in them.
    >>>
    >>>As far as the rest of the old body is concerned, I can still, just, do
    >>>one single one-legged deep squat on each leg, so the legs and knees
    >>>are not too bad. I'll be limited with what I can do with bigger
    >>>muscles by the fact that I'll probably have to keep my heart under
    >>>135bpm, at least initially. That can still get me up a big steep hill
    >>>at a constant slow plodding pace.
    >>>
    >>>So, my current aim is a one arm pullup with both arms by April 31st,
    >>>currently being able to do 5 two-arm pullups. My arms will then be
    >>>stronger than at any time in my previous life, and if they prove able
    >>>to do that, why not the rest?

    >
    >> If you succeed, I'm not sure you'll have proved much more than you
    >> have excellent genetics.

    >
    >Not sure about that. There's nobody remotely athletic on either side
    >of my family. For the first 15 years of my life I was widely and
    >correctly regarded as a puny weakling. I managed to avoid all gym and
    >athletics at school by getting asthmatic sick notes, because the gym
    >teachers selected me as the weakling to humiliate and mock publicly as
    >a bad example in order to motivate the others.
    >
    >In the end I developed some wiry strength by spending a lot of my time
    >on a bicycle or up a tree, but I was always very skinny. I suspect
    >that means that I'm genetically disinclined to put on much muscle
    >mass.
    >
    >It is already clear to me, knowing what I have experimentally
    >discovered about my own muscles' behaviour, that if I had simply
    >bought some random glossy fitness training book off the shelf and
    >followed its advice I would have made rather slow progress and
    >eventually got stuck in a plateau, and everyone would have told me
    >"what can you expect at your age".
    >
    >Just for the record I'm 5'7" and weigh 145 lbs. My doc tells me I'm at
    >a good weight, but I tell him he's hypnotised by averages and what I
    >really am is an overweight skinny man who ought to lose at least 15lb
    >of flab. I recently discovered I was diabetic and since adjusting my
    >diet (e.g. no bread, no potatoes) I've started losing about 1lb a
    >month.
    >
    >Despite my sedentary life for the last few decades I've managed to
    >retain a residual level of fitness by refusing to own a car. If I'd
    >bought a car I know I personally wouldn't have been able to resist the
    >temptation to travel around on my bum instead of my feet.


    Well, good luck. A one-armed pullup is exceptional at any age. If
    you make it, you'll be a statistical outlier, especially if you do it
    by the end of April.

    -----------
    Proton Soup

    "Thanks for noticing that I didn't actually say anything." - Mike Lane
     
  5. Neal Fabian

    Neal Fabian Guest

    Chris Malcolm wrote:
    > Proton Soup <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > On 7 Feb 2005 03:17:08 GMT, Chris Malcolm <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:

    >
    > >>Now that I've checked through this newsgroup and some web sites it
    > >>looks as though what I've done is re-invent a form of HST. I'm
    > >>pleasantly surprised to see that these 62 year old muscles have

    still
    > >>got plenty of adaptive life left in them.
    > >>
    > >>As far as the rest of the old body is concerned, I can still, just,

    do
    > >>one single one-legged deep squat on each leg, so the legs and knees
    > >>are not too bad. I'll be limited with what I can do with bigger
    > >>muscles by the fact that I'll probably have to keep my heart under
    > >>135bpm, at least initially. That can still get me up a big steep

    hill
    > >>at a constant slow plodding pace.
    > >>
    > >>So, my current aim is a one arm pullup with both arms by April

    31st,
    > >>currently being able to do 5 two-arm pullups. My arms will then be
    > >>stronger than at any time in my previous life, and if they prove

    able
    > >>to do that, why not the rest?

    >
    > > If you succeed, I'm not sure you'll have proved much more than you
    > > have excellent genetics.

    >
    > Not sure about that. There's nobody remotely athletic on either side
    > of my family. For the first 15 years of my life I was widely and
    > correctly regarded as a puny weakling. I managed to avoid all gym and
    > athletics at school by getting asthmatic sick notes, because the gym
    > teachers selected me as the weakling to humiliate and mock publicly

    as
    > a bad example in order to motivate the others.
    >
    > In the end I developed some wiry strength by spending a lot of my

    time
    > on a bicycle or up a tree, but I was always very skinny. I suspect
    > that means that I'm genetically disinclined to put on much muscle
    > mass.
    >
    > It is already clear to me, knowing what I have experimentally
    > discovered about my own muscles' behaviour, that if I had simply
    > bought some random glossy fitness training book off the shelf and
    > followed its advice I would have made rather slow progress and
    > eventually got stuck in a plateau, and everyone would have told me
    > "what can you expect at your age".
    >
    > Just for the record I'm 5'7" and weigh 145 lbs. My doc tells me I'm

    at
    > a good weight, but I tell him he's hypnotised by averages and what I
    > really am is an overweight skinny man who ought to lose at least 15lb
    > of flab. I recently discovered I was diabetic and since adjusting my
    > diet (e.g. no bread, no potatoes) I've started losing about 1lb a
    > month.
    >
    > Despite my sedentary life for the last few decades I've managed to
    > retain a residual level of fitness by refusing to own a car. If I'd
    > bought a car I know I personally wouldn't have been able to resist

    the
    > temptation to travel around on my bum instead of my feet.
    >
    > --
    > Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
    > IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    > [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]



    I assume "dicky heart" is an esoteric medical term. Lord Hudson really
    should have responded to your post, what with you both being of senior
    years, and being compatriots and all, but he's probably on holiday
    somewhere, so I'll try to fill in.

    Negativity is considered bad form, but sometimes it's appropriate; this
    is one of those times. You are never, ever, going to do a true one arm
    pull-up. You wrote that you had done one, forty years ago, but that
    was then and this is now. Even when you were twenty-two, it was an
    amazing feat, if, as you wrote, you were able to do it only as a result
    of your tree climbing. Your ability to do five regular pulls now, is
    because you started from nothing. Then too, you didn't write how long
    it's taken you to get to five. You wrote that your spreadsheet
    indicates progress of about ten percent per week. How many reps
    constitute ten percent of five?

    You're right about twenty-five being a generalized threshold for a one
    arm pull, but the variable is wide.

    Models and spreadsheets aren't the best way to develop a training
    routine. Following a program that's predicated upon established
    principles of training, is. I'm shamelessly suggesting that you read
    mine. It's free, and it's the best there is. That's a combination
    that's hard to find.

    Just one more thing; about that dicky heart. I know it's a cliché,
    but you should see your doctor before you embark upon any program. You
    mentioned prudent limits on your heart rate. Have you thought about
    your blood pressure? Do you have any idea how high your BP can go,
    during the final rep or two of squats?

    If you want to train, train. Get your doctor's approval, do it
    sensibly, and follow a good program, with goals that are realistic.
    Oh, and congratulations on your being able to do a one leg free squat.
    That's pretty good.

    Neal Fabian
    visit my website; BIO, PHOTOS & ARTICLES
    training advice and much more -- come by and meet me
    http://hometown.aol.com/nfabian/myhomepage/index.html
    HOW GOOD CAN YOU GET? is now up on my website, in NEW STUFF, on the
    cover page. Check it out. Also, I have a new b&w addition to my
    gallery, by a terrific photographer who is new to physique art. It's
    in ABSOLUTELY...PART II.
    My training program, ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT
    DEVELOPING YOUR BODY, is up on my website.
     
  6. Neal Fabian <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Chris Malcolm wrote:
    >> Proton Soup <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> > On 7 Feb 2005 03:17:08 GMT, Chris Malcolm <[email protected]>
    >> > wrote:


    >> >>As far as the rest of the old body is concerned, I can still, just,

    > do
    >> >>one single one-legged deep squat on each leg, so the legs and knees
    >> >>are not too bad. I'll be limited with what I can do with bigger
    >> >>muscles by the fact that I'll probably have to keep my heart under
    >> >>135bpm, at least initially. That can still get me up a big steep

    > hill
    >> >>at a constant slow plodding pace.
    >> >>
    >> >>So, my current aim is a one arm pullup with both arms by April

    > 31st,
    >> >>currently being able to do 5 two-arm pullups. My arms will then be
    >> >>stronger than at any time in my previous life, and if they prove

    > able
    >> >>to do that, why not the rest?


    >> > If you succeed, I'm not sure you'll have proved much more than you
    >> > have excellent genetics.


    >> Not sure about that. There's nobody remotely athletic on either side
    >> of my family. For the first 15 years of my life I was widely and
    >> correctly regarded as a puny weakling. I managed to avoid all gym and
    >> athletics at school by getting asthmatic sick notes, because the gym
    >> teachers selected me as the weakling to humiliate and mock publicly

    > as
    >> a bad example in order to motivate the others.
    >>
    >> In the end I developed some wiry strength by spending a lot of my

    > time
    >> on a bicycle or up a tree, but I was always very skinny. I suspect
    >> that means that I'm genetically disinclined to put on much muscle
    >> mass.
    >>
    >> It is already clear to me, knowing what I have experimentally
    >> discovered about my own muscles' behaviour, that if I had simply
    >> bought some random glossy fitness training book off the shelf and
    >> followed its advice I would have made rather slow progress and
    >> eventually got stuck in a plateau, and everyone would have told me
    >> "what can you expect at your age".
    >>
    >> Just for the record I'm 5'7" and weigh 145 lbs. My doc tells me I'm

    > at
    >> a good weight, but I tell him he's hypnotised by averages and what I
    >> really am is an overweight skinny man who ought to lose at least 15lb
    >> of flab. I recently discovered I was diabetic and since adjusting my
    >> diet (e.g. no bread, no potatoes) I've started losing about 1lb a
    >> month.


    > I assume "dicky heart" is an esoteric medical term.


    I've had a heart attack, have high blood presssure (142/78), sometimes
    suffer from angina, and my heart starts having trouble due to lack of
    oxygen at over 150bpm. These problems tend all to diminish when I take
    more exercise.

    > Negativity is considered bad form, but sometimes it's appropriate; this
    > is one of those times. You are never, ever, going to do a true one arm
    > pull-up.


    Thanks for the challenge, it will help the motivation!

    > You wrote that you had done one, forty years ago, but that
    > was then and this is now. Even when you were twenty-two, it was an
    > amazing feat, if, as you wrote, you were able to do it only as a result
    > of your tree climbing.


    I was also unbeatable at scaffolding races. That's when you find a
    tall building covered in scaffolding late at night and race your
    friends to the top, without using any steps etc., just pull ups and
    mantle shelfs from level to level of the exterior scaffolding. It's a
    killer for arms, heart, and lungs.

    > Your ability to do five regular pulls now, is
    > because you started from nothing. Then too, you didn't write how long
    > it's taken you to get to five.


    I pottered around for a long time slowly getting up to one, then I
    started being more serious about it. I went from one to five in 54
    days in wgat I now realise was a very inefficient training regime.

    > You wrote that your spreadsheet
    > indicates progress of about ten percent per week. How many reps
    > constitute ten percent of five?


    0.5 of course. If I gain four reps in 54 days then in seven days I'm
    gaining on average about an 1/8th of a rep a week, but in practice
    it's not a linear gain but a proportional one. That's how I do on a
    deliberately haphazard regime in which I sometimes do sessions an hour
    apart, sometimes a week apart, and any value in between. I expect to
    do a lot better when I move on to particular combinations of timing
    chosen for fast gain. My regime so far has been deliberately haphazard
    in order to collect the best data for model building.

    > You're right about twenty-five being a generalized threshold for a one
    > arm pull, but the variable is wide.


    I recall that way back when I could do my one arm pullup I could do
    more than 20 but never as many as 30 two-arm pullups. I'm sure I
    cheated a bit by doing a little bit of a jump to get me started. It
    was a party trick I used to silence rubgy football players who used to
    sneer at my physique. But I never did any specific training, I simply
    had fun in trees, scaffolding, cliffs, etc..

    > Models and spreadsheets aren't the best way to develop a training
    > routine. Following a program that's predicated upon established
    > principles of training, is. I'm shamelessly suggesting that you read
    > mine. It's free, and it's the best there is. That's a combination
    > that's hard to find.


    But your routines, like others based on established principles, are
    based on averages and safely conservative assumptions. I'm rather far
    from average. Muscularly speaking I'm a skinny "hard gainer" plus
    being 62 yrs old.

    To judge by the photographs on your web page you're also heavily into
    cosmetic muscle mass building, which I have no interest in. I'm
    interested in maximum muscular efficiency, the most strength in the
    *smallest* *lightest* muscles, because I'm interested in performance
    defined with respect to my own weight, not with respect to absolute
    gym weights. It's a different game. I want to put on as little muscle
    mass as possible, consistent with gaining durable strength to move my
    own body weight around with arms and legs.

    > Models and spreadsheets aren't the best way to
    > develop a training routine. Following a program that's predicated
    > upon established principles of training, is.


    That's true if you're not an expert at mathematical model building,
    which few people are. But as it happens I am. I also notice that there
    seems to be a certain amount of dispute between expert trainers on
    established principles. Some say you should never do something which
    others lay great emphasis on doing. This does not give me confidence
    in the allegedly established principles.

    > Just one more thing; about that dicky heart. I know it's a clich?,
    > but you should see your doctor before you embark upon any program. You
    > mentioned prudent limits on your heart rate. Have you thought about
    > your blood pressure? Do you have any idea how high your BP can go,
    > during the final rep or two of squats?


    I wear a heart monitor and keep the pace down so that I don't exceed
    the 140bpm figure I've agreed with my cardiologist and
    doctor. Temporary High BP during exertion doesn't worry me, so long as
    it goes down when I rest. I should point out by the way that I don't
    go in for weighted squats, because I've already got all the strength I
    need in my legs (can do a one legged deep squat). What I want to
    develop is endurance and wide range strength, so my leg exercise is
    very high reps of slow Hindu squats. I currently do 100ish.

    > If you want to train, train. Get your doctor's approval, do it
    > sensibly, and follow a good program, with goals that are realistic.


    I get terribly bored training, so bored that this is the first time in
    my life I've ever tried to do it. The intellectual excitement of
    ignoring the advice of experts and making it up as I go along is what
    makes it interesting enough to keep me motivated. My declared goal
    (one arm pullup by end of April) is based on my model of my own
    muscles' response to training which now seems able to predict quite
    closely what I will be able to do next time based on past history of
    training. It's a five factor model based on the four factors of muscle
    fatigue, muscle strain, muscle training, and muscle growth, plus a
    time of day factor (I'm at my physical peak in the late afternoon). I
    have discovered experimentally that those are the five most important
    factors, for me, at the moment. I have fitted their parameters to the
    data by hill climbing to minimise the sum of squared errors between
    prediction and performance.

    Having established that model, I can now use it to check out the
    likely effects of various different training regimes. All the ones
    from books and web sites that I've tried on my model give me slow
    limited progress compared to those I've optimised for my own muscle
    characteristics. In theory of course. But I haven't simply pulled my
    goal of "one arm pullup by end of April" out of thin air. It took me
    about two days concentrated work to develop the software that enables
    me to use my model to compare the likely results of different training
    training regimes, and that looks like an achievable goal.

    I expect to discover that my model will need correction, and that my
    regime will need to be adapted in the light of that. But because I'm
    tracking the performance of my model day by day against my actual
    achievements, I'll spot that very early, and re-optimise my regime
    early on. I've explored the consequences of the model being wrong in
    various ways, and my goal takes those possibilities into account.

    > Oh, and congratulations on your being able to do a one leg free squat.
    > That's pretty good.


    I just checked to see how many I could do, and I can actually do
    three. I guess it's time to incorporate that into my exercise regime
    :)

    I chose my "one arm pullup by end of April" because it does look
    acheivable on the basis of what I've learnt so far about my arm
    muscles, and I also knew it would be considered damn near
    impossible. It's therefore a rather good test of whether my model of
    my arm muscle benaviour is any good.

    If I fail, I'll admit I was wrong. If I succeed, I hope you will admit
    you were wrong :)

    --
    Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
    IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
     
  7. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Chris Malcolm
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    [snip]
    >
    > I was also unbeatable at scaffolding races. That's when you find a
    > tall building covered in scaffolding late at night and race your
    > friends to the top, without using any steps etc., just pull ups and
    > mantle shelfs from level to level of the exterior scaffolding. It's a
    > killer for arms, heart, and lungs.


    We used to race up guy wires when I was working my way through university.
    Same idea.
    >
    > I recall that way back when I could do my one arm pullup I could do
    > more than 20 but never as many as 30 two-arm pullups. I'm sure I
    > cheated a bit by doing a little bit of a jump to get me started. It
    > was a party trick I used to silence rubgy football players who used to
    > sneer at my physique. But I never did any specific training, I simply
    > had fun in trees, scaffolding, cliffs, etc..


    Which is good training for what you are doing. The ability to display
    endurance (many pull-ups) is different than strength (one armed pull-up or
    pull-up with additional weight.)

    Doing a one-armed pullup by April is going to be very tough. But in 6-9
    months given your genetic background it is a distinct possibility. The
    strategy of short and very frequent workouts is a good one.

    BTW - using a bodybuilding program for your goal isn't a great idea.

    Couple of sites you may find interesting.

    http://www.cbass.com/Synaptic.htm

    http://www.dragondoor.com/articler/mode3/69/

    --
    Keith
     
  8. Neal Fabian

    Neal Fabian Guest

    Chris Malcolm wrote:
    <snip>

    Neal Fabian wrote:

    You wrote that your spreadsheet
    indicates progress of about ten percent per week. How many reps
    constitute ten percent of five?

    Chris Malcolm wrote:

    0.5 of course. If I gain four reps in 54 days then in seven days I'm
    ________________
    Ummmm, Chris, that was a joke; a mini giggle.

    Going from 0 to 5 pull-ups in two months is pretty good, given your
    age. I don't mean to disparage your accomplishment, and I certainly
    admire and respect your determination, but your age is nevertheless a
    factor in what you are able to do. I think yours is at least as much
    an intellectual pursuit as a physical one. It's interesting, but I
    don't think you're open to a critique, not right now. Maybe later on.

    Neal Fabian
    visit my website; BIO, PHOTOS & ARTICLES
    training advice and much more -- come by and meet me
    http://hometown.aol.com/nfabian/myhomepage/index.html
    HOW GOOD CAN YOU GET? is now up on my website, in NEW STUFF, on the
    cover page. Check it out. Also, I have a new b&w addition to my
    gallery, by a terrific photographer who is new to physique art. It's
    in ABSOLUTELY...PART II.
    My training program, ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT
    DEVELOPING YOUR BODY, is up on my website.
     
  9. Neal Fabian <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Chris Malcolm wrote:


    [about goal of getting to a one arm pullup, or at least 25 two arm
    ones, by end of April.]

    > Going from 0 to 5 pull-ups in two months is pretty good, given your
    > age. I don't mean to disparage your accomplishment, and I certainly
    > admire and respect your determination, but your age is nevertheless a
    > factor in what you are able to do. I think yours is at least as much
    > an intellectual pursuit as a physical one. It's interesting, but I
    > don't think you're open to a critique, not right now. Maybe later on.


    Of course, I was simply putting my stake in the ground. I got from 1
    to 5 pullups in two months by a rather haphazard and desultory
    training regime. I now have collected enough info on how my owm
    muscles behave to devise a more efficent programme of training which
    I'm starting now.

    I'll report back when I get to 15. If things go according to plan that
    should be before the end of March.

    --
    Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
    IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
     
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