Re: Recumbent OUCH!



T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Former RANS V-Rex rider Rex Kerr wrote:
> A coworker has a SWB USS recumbent in the office... it's longer than
> the wall between his cube and the neighboring cube. A few minutes ago I
> was there talking about some issue and when I turn to leave I hit the
> extended chainring with my knee. My "catch the falling bike!" instinct
> kicks in and I go to grab it and drive a chainring tooth deep into the
> soft tissue between my thumb and forefinger.
>
> OUCH! Now blood is dripping all over!!
>
> See, if it'd been a DF bike that wouldn't have happened! First, it
> would have fit in the space provided like the dozens of other bikes
> around here, and second the chainring would have been in a safer
> location!!!
>
> Just trolling... :)


You are being punished by the Gods of RANS for your loss of faith.

The exposed chain wheels are there to punish the clumsy. They also serve
to shift the advantage from pedestrian to cyclist in a collision (the
pedestrian almost always wins in an upright bicycle to pedestrian
collision).

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
"And never forget, life ultimately makes failures of all people." A. Derleth
 
R

Rex Kerr

Guest
Tom Sherman wrote:
> You are being punished by the Gods of RANS for your loss of faith.


Man, good memory. Yeah, I dabbled for a number of years, but I'm now
recumbent free.

That said, perhaps you're right. After years of injury free recumbent
ownership I get this from a stray recumbent!
 
R

Ryan Cousineau

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Rex Kerr <[email protected]> wrote:

> Tom Sherman wrote:
> > You are being punished by the Gods of RANS for your loss of faith.

>
> Man, good memory. Yeah, I dabbled for a number of years, but I'm now
> recumbent free.
>
> That said, perhaps you're right. After years of injury free recumbent
> ownership I get this from a stray recumbent!


What drove your apostasy?

--
Ryan Cousineau [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com/
"My scenarios may give the impression I could be an excellent crook.
Not true - I am a talented lawyer." - Sandy in rec.bicycles.racing
 
3

32GO

Guest
Former RANS V-Rex rider Rex Kerr wrote:

>A coworker has a SWB USS recumbent in the office... I hit
>the extended chainring with my knee... I go to grab it
>and drive a chainring tooth deep into the soft tissue
>between my thumb and forefinger.


In our small (trikes only) shop, we usually have a few
tadpoles sitting on their wheels with cranks facing the
public. We use a commercial edge protector made of heavy
plastic with metal inserts with a U-shaped cross section
that wraps nicely around the big chainring to avoid any
(more) awkward and painful shin biting experiences. We
also sell them trimmed to length, with a 3-2-GO vinyl
label added for snob appeal, for local customers. These
simple little doodads have been very well accepted, and
they also work nicely to keep chain grease off seats and
such when transporting trikes in minivans, for example.
We've even finally learned to (almost) always remove them
before riding...

Regards,
Wayne Leggett
3-2-GO: The Trike Store
Ventura CA USA
 
G

gotbent

Guest
"32GO" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]m...
> Former RANS V-Rex rider Rex Kerr wrote:
>
>>A coworker has a SWB USS recumbent in the office... I hit
>>the extended chainring with my knee... I go to grab it
>>and drive a chainring tooth deep into the soft tissue
>>between my thumb and forefinger.

>
> In our small (trikes only) shop, we usually have a few
> tadpoles sitting on their wheels with cranks facing the
> public. We use a commercial edge protector made of heavy
> plastic with metal inserts with a U-shaped cross section
> that wraps nicely around the big chainring to avoid any
> (more) awkward and painful shin biting experiences. We
> also sell them trimmed to length, with a 3-2-GO vinyl
> label added for snob appeal, for local customers. These
> simple little doodads have been very well accepted, and
> they also work nicely to keep chain grease off seats and
> such when transporting trikes in minivans, for example.
> We've even finally learned to (almost) always remove them
> before riding...
>
> Regards,
> Wayne Leggett
> 3-2-GO: The Trike Store
> Ventura CA USA


Like Trim-Loc (or equivalent), the stuff that is used to protect/decorate
hard shell seats?



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
 
J

Just A User

Guest
Tom Sherman wrote:
> Former RANS V-Rex rider Rex Kerr wrote:
>> A coworker has a SWB USS recumbent in the office... it's longer than
>> the wall between his cube and the neighboring cube. A few minutes ago
>> I was there talking about some issue and when I turn to leave I hit
>> the extended chainring with my knee. My "catch the falling bike!"
>> instinct kicks in and I go to grab it and drive a chainring tooth deep
>> into the soft tissue between my thumb and forefinger.
>>
>> OUCH! Now blood is dripping all over!!
>>
>> See, if it'd been a DF bike that wouldn't have happened! First, it
>> would have fit in the space provided like the dozens of other bikes
>> around here, and second the chainring would have been in a safer
>> location!!!
>>
>> Just trolling... :)

>
> You are being punished by the Gods of RANS for your loss of faith.
>
> The exposed chain wheels are there to punish the clumsy. They also serve
> to shift the advantage from pedestrian to cyclist in a collision (the
> pedestrian almost always wins in an upright bicycle to pedestrian
> collision).
>

The Gods of RANS have a funny way of punishing people.
About the chainring sticking out. A df wheel sticks out a similar
distance as the chainrings on a SWB recumbent.
 
3

32GO

Guest
gotbent asked:


>[A commercial edge protector made of heavy plastic with
>metal inserts with a U-shaped cross section] like Trim-Loc
>(or equivalent), the stuff that is used to protect/decorate
>hard shell seats?


Yes. There's a bewildering range of materials, textures,
colors and sizes, and it can be hard to find the right stuff
without buying a huge roll.

Regards,
Wayne Leggett
3-2-GO: The Trike Store
 
W

Wilson Warmouth

Guest
"32GO" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]m...
> Former RANS V-Rex rider Rex Kerr wrote:
>
>>A coworker has a SWB USS recumbent in the office... I hit
>>the extended chainring with my knee... I go to grab it
>>and drive a chainring tooth deep into the soft tissue
>>between my thumb and forefinger.

>
> In our small (trikes only) shop, we usually have a few
> tadpoles sitting on their wheels with cranks facing the
> public. We use a commercial edge protector made of heavy
> plastic with metal inserts with a U-shaped cross section
> that wraps nicely around the big chainring to avoid any
> (more) awkward and painful shin biting experiences. We
> also sell them trimmed to length, with a 3-2-GO vinyl
> label added for snob appeal, for local customers. These
> simple little doodads have been very well accepted, and
> they also work nicely to keep chain grease off seats and
> such when transporting trikes in minivans, for example.
> We've even finally learned to (almost) always remove them
> before riding...
>
> Regards,
> Wayne Leggett
> 3-2-GO: The Trike Store
> Ventura CA USA


Perhaps a simpler solution might be to leave the chain on the larger chain
ring when you park the bike/trike. That might mean the difference between
paying for a pair of pants going to the cleaners as opposed to paying for a
person going to the emergency room for a relatively minor injury.
 
G

gotbent

Guest
"Wilson Warmouth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "32GO" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]m...
>> Former RANS V-Rex rider Rex Kerr wrote:
>>
>>>A coworker has a SWB USS recumbent in the office... I hit
>>>the extended chainring with my knee... I go to grab it
>>>and drive a chainring tooth deep into the soft tissue
>>>between my thumb and forefinger.

>>
>> In our small (trikes only) shop, we usually have a few
>> tadpoles sitting on their wheels with cranks facing the
>> public. We use a commercial edge protector made of heavy
>> plastic with metal inserts with a U-shaped cross section
>> that wraps nicely around the big chainring to avoid any
>> (more) awkward and painful shin biting experiences. We
>> also sell them trimmed to length, with a 3-2-GO vinyl
>> label added for snob appeal, for local customers. These
>> simple little doodads have been very well accepted, and
>> they also work nicely to keep chain grease off seats and
>> such when transporting trikes in minivans, for example.
>> We've even finally learned to (almost) always remove them
>> before riding...
>>
>> Regards,
>> Wayne Leggett
>> 3-2-GO: The Trike Store
>> Ventura CA USA

>
> Perhaps a simpler solution might be to leave the chain on the larger chain
> ring when you park the bike/trike. That might mean the difference between
> paying for a pair of pants going to the cleaners as opposed to paying for
> a person going to the emergency room for a relatively minor injury.
>

Why would someone go to the hospital for a minor injury? That seems rather a
stretch of credulity.

FWIW I use a heavy duty trash sack to cover the greasy bits of my trike when
I transport it by Subaru. I pull the bag over the chainrings and gather it
around the boom and stuff the gathered bit under the waterbottle cage, or in
the cage and then put a bottle in the cage. This protects the front seats
from chain grease and chainring tattoos and from the pedals too.

Yesterday, I found another use for the bag. When I got to my buddys house, I
arranged the bag to cover the seat back. My riding jacket is from my MTB
days and has a windproof front, but a breathable back and I lose a lot of
heat through the mesh seat cover. The trash bag worked pretty well to help
keep me comfortable on a 1°c day.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
 
R

Roger Zoul

Guest

> "32GO" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> In our small (trikes only) shop, we usually have a few
>> tadpoles sitting on their wheels with cranks facing the
>> public. We use a commercial edge protector made of heavy
>> plastic with metal inserts with a U-shaped cross section
>> that wraps nicely around the big chainring to avoid any
>> (more) awkward and painful shin biting experiences. We
>> also sell them trimmed to length, with a 3-2-GO vinyl
>> label added for snob appeal, for local customers. These
>> simple little doodads have been very well accepted, and
>> they also work nicely to keep chain grease off seats and
>> such when transporting trikes in minivans, for example.
>> We've even finally learned to (almost) always remove them
>> before riding...
>>
>> Regards,
>> Wayne Leggett
>> 3-2-GO: The Trike Store
>> Ventura CA USA


Wayne, do you have a pic of this thing somewhere? I'd like something like
this for my GT5, to protect the chainring when folding/unfolding the trike,
as well as when it's in the trunk. I can surely rig something myself, but I
enjoy the "snob" factor as long as it's not pricey to have.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
32GO aka Wayne Leggett wrote:
> Former RANS V-Rex rider Rex Kerr wrote:
>
>> A coworker has a SWB USS recumbent in the office... I hit
>> the extended chainring with my knee... I go to grab it
>> and drive a chainring tooth deep into the soft tissue
>> between my thumb and forefinger.

>
> In our small (trikes only) shop, we usually have a few
> tadpoles sitting on their wheels with cranks facing the
> public. We use a commercial edge protector made of heavy
> plastic with metal inserts with a U-shaped cross section
> that wraps nicely around the big chainring to avoid any
> (more) awkward and painful shin biting experiences. We
> also sell them trimmed to length, with a 3-2-GO vinyl
> label added for snob appeal, for local customers. These
> simple little doodads have been very well accepted, and
> they also work nicely to keep chain grease off seats and
> such when transporting trikes in minivans, for example.
> We've even finally learned to (almost) always remove them
> before riding...


I use a section of clear PVC hose with a slit in it - fits over the
chain and large chain ring. Available at your local hardware store for a
few cents per foot.

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
"And never forget, life ultimately makes failures of all people."
- A. Derleth
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Former V-Rex Owner Rex Kerr wrote:
>> The Gods of RANS have a funny way of punishing people.
>> About the chainring sticking out. A df wheel sticks out a similar
>> distance as the chainrings on a SWB recumbent.

>
> Nope, I owned a recumbent, and it most definitely was longer than my DF
> bikes. Also, the wheels on my bikes tend to not be as sharp as a
> chainring. :)


Chain guards that cover the chainrings from approximately 12 o'clock to
6 o'clock (clockwise, looking at the drive side) are commercially
available for SWB recumbents, as long as the tooth count is not too large.

> PS: Why the crosspost? Mine was in fun, but crossposting to the
> recumbent group is just asking for a flamewar!


The subject was on-topic to more than one group. Furthermore, discussion
is fun. Usenet should not be boring.

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
"And never forget, life ultimately makes failures of all people."
- A. Derleth
 
R

Rex Kerr

Guest
Ryan Cousineau wrote:
>> That said, perhaps you're right. After years of injury free recumbent
>> ownership I get this from a stray recumbent!

>
> What drove your apostasy?


The fact that I enjoy riding my DF bikes much more and actually find
them to be more comfortable than my V-Rex was. That's me, and others
may disagree, but for now I'm a DF rider.
 
R

Roger Zoul

Guest
"Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> 32GO aka Wayne Leggett wrote:
>> Former RANS V-Rex rider Rex Kerr wrote:
>>
>>> A coworker has a SWB USS recumbent in the office... I hit
>>> the extended chainring with my knee... I go to grab it
>>> and drive a chainring tooth deep into the soft tissue
>>> between my thumb and forefinger.

>>
>> In our small (trikes only) shop, we usually have a few
>> tadpoles sitting on their wheels with cranks facing the
>> public. We use a commercial edge protector made of heavy
>> plastic with metal inserts with a U-shaped cross section
>> that wraps nicely around the big chainring to avoid any
>> (more) awkward and painful shin biting experiences. We
>> also sell them trimmed to length, with a 3-2-GO vinyl
>> label added for snob appeal, for local customers. These
>> simple little doodads have been very well accepted, and
>> they also work nicely to keep chain grease off seats and
>> such when transporting trikes in minivans, for example.
>> We've even finally learned to (almost) always remove them
>> before riding...

>
> I use a section of clear PVC hose with a slit in it - fits over the chain
> and large chain ring. Available at your local hardware store for a few
> cents per foot.


Thanks for that idea!
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Roger Zoul wrote:
> "Tom Sherman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> ...
>> I use a section of clear PVC hose with a slit in it - fits over the chain
>> and large chain ring. Available at your local hardware store for a few
>> cents per foot.

>
> Thanks for that idea!
>

Actually, I have used more that one piece when transporting my RANS
Rocket inside a car - I cut pieces to fit over the longer exposed chain
runs. I have avoided many "chain tattoos" this way.

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
"And never forget, life ultimately makes failures of all people."
- A. Derleth
 
W

Wilson Warmouth

Guest
"Edward Dolan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:Kuud[email protected]
>
>
> I don't think 'diamond frame' is a very good term for an upright bicycle.
> I think 'upright' is a far better term since it describes how you are
> seated on the bike. That is what matters, not how the bike is constructed.
>


I've done my best to explain to the Great Saint that one does not sit
upright on an upright bicycle seat if one is to be comfortable on an upright
bicycle. Is it possible that a Great Saint could be lacking cognitive
ability?
 
W

Wilson Warmouth

Guest
"Edward Dolan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Wilson Warmouth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>>
>> "Edward Dolan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>>
>>>
>>> I don't think 'diamond frame' is a very good term for an upright
>>> bicycle. I think 'upright' is a far better term since it describes how
>>> you are seated on the bike. That is what matters, not how the bike is
>>> constructed.
>>>

>>
>> I've done my best to explain to the Great Saint that one does not sit
>> upright on an upright bicycle seat if one is to be comfortable on an
>> upright bicycle. Is it possible that a Great Saint could be lacking
>> cognitive ability?

>
> Unless you posted to ARBR I did not see your message.
>
> It is understood that you sort of lean against the seat (saddle) with your
> weight evenly distributed between your butt, your legs and your arms.



Yes. This is the way thousands and thousands of men, women, and children
ride upright/diamond frame bikes in comfort for up to 100 miles or more in a
days time.


> However, that is for racers only. The rest of us sit on the god damn
> things and suffer accordingly. Ever notice how hybrid type of bikes have
> replaced road bikes for the general populace? That is because everyone is
> reconciled to sitting upright on saddles despite what racers do.



We are talking about recreational riders not racers, not supermen, not
superwomen, not superchildren. The Great Saint said he has ridden organized
cross-state rides so surely he must have noticed the diamond frame riders
around him riding in comfort. If an upright/diamond frame bike not properly
fitted or ridden correctly it will most likely be uncomfortable if ridden
for any length of time. The same can be said of some recumbents. Google
"recumbent butt" for confirmation. Bikes that are not properly fitted tend
to spend a lot of time garaged with their tires flat.

>
> Another interesting phenomenon is that recumbents are not exactly that
> either since you sit on them in a semi-recumbent position. But a recumbent
> racer may very well be in a full recumbent position on some very special
> racing recumbents. But they are totally impractical for general street
> use.
>



My recumbent bike, an Easy Racer GRR, is a refined design that has stood the
test of time. I find it completely practical for general street use. This
bike meets my needs and I desire no other recumbent bike.


> By the way, a bike saddle will cause all kind of groin problems sooner or
> later, especially if you ride for many hours every day. The medical
> literature is full of tales of woe of cyclists who have suffered serious
> injury in the groin area from too much cycling. This NEVER happens with a
> recumbent because you are seated on a proper seat, not a saddle. Alas, too
> late we get wise.
>


Not to be trite, but too much of a good thing can sometimes be way too much
of a good thing. It's unfortunate that someone didn't come up with the
name "woody bike" instead of "recumbent bike" (if you don't understand this
ask your physician about "men's health" and bike riding).
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
Wilson Warmouth wrote:

> Yes. This is the way thousands and thousands of men, women, and children
> ride upright/diamond frame bikes in comfort for up to 100 miles or more in a
> days time.


Comfort is a relative thing. The seat I'm sat in as I type this is one
I'd describe as quite comfy, but for just sitting in it's also the case
that it's considerably /less/ comfy than the easy chairs in my sitting
room. Of course, they're lousy for mouse and keyboard use, which is why
I don't use them at a computer, but in terms of seated comfort the easy
chairs are just /better/.

As long as the recumbent seat doesn't interfere with anything else you
need to do on the bike (like work the steering), it remains the case
that better is better.

But, as one can easily demonstrate with a decent work chair, "less
comfortable" does not equate to "uncomfortable" or "problematical".

I ride my 'bent on long distance rides primarily for reasons of greater
comfort and hence greater enjoyment over thr course of several hours,
but I still enjoyed myself on the DF tourer I used to have, and still
enjoy using my upright folder,

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
R

Rex Kerr

Guest
Edward Dolan wrote:
> Rex Kerr must have an iron ass.


I may have to adopt this as a nickname.

> I have never heard of anyone who thought it was more comfy to sit on

a saddle than a proper seat. However, the thought also occurs to me that
he is most likely insane.

Yep, they undo the straps on my straight jacket long enough for me to
type a message or two a few times per day.

> I suspect the most comfy seat in his house is the toilet seat in the

bathroom.

For its purpose, yes. It works MUCH better than any other for that purpose.

> By the way (speaking of ****), what is this DF ****?


As explained by others, DF = diamond frame since one could draw a
diamond (almost parallelogram) between the top tube and chainstays vs.
downtube and seat stays.


That said, I've found road bikes with the handlebars properly placed at
seat height and a well worn Brooks saddle to be extremely comfortable.
When I sit on my most ridden Brooks my weight is so well distributed
that it actually feels quite soft, almost pillow like. The width of a
B17 is perfect for me. On my last tour with 10+ hours per day in the
saddle I found that I was resting on the steepest climbs (12%-14%) by
placing my foot on the guardrail and sitting on the saddle since it was
difficult to get off of the fully loaded bike on a steep hill. I felt
no immediate need to get off of the saddle!

On recumbents (I've ridden a few, and owned the V-Rex for about 5 years)
I could never seem to find the right position. My toes would get numb
with high bottom brackets, I'd be sitting in a pool of sweat, my glutes
would be numb from sitting on them while they're trying to work, etc.
Not to mention, the few times that I unexpectedly needed to get home
fast and took the train it was darn near impossible to get that thing
on/off the train!!

There were a few times when I preferred riding the recumbent. I loved
the low down feeling when descending and doing the twisties, it was
exhilarating. I also found them to be best when riding with slow
riders. When riding really slow I find that I put too much pressure on
a regular saddle and it does get uncomfortable more quickly. In those
cases, a big easy chair is more appropriate, but I don't often ride that
way, and when I do I just spend more time standing out of the saddle to
compensate.

Sorry, but they're just not for everybody! Perhaps lack of
marketing/availability isn't the only reason that they're not more common?

-Rex
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Edward Dolan wrote:
> ...
> I agree that Easy Racers got it right from the beginning. The only thing is
> that you need to get the seat laid back enough to get some of your weight
> off your butt. That cobra seat however was a disaster. Recumbents require
> foam seats for total comfort....


However, the Easy Racers Cobra seat is quite comfortable compared to the
pre-Cobra hard-shell seat (which even looked uncomfortable).

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
"And never forget, life ultimately makes failures of all people."
- A. Derleth