Re: Shoe fitting

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Peter Cole, Apr 12, 2005.

  1. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    Cwazee Yeti wrote:
    > I've always had a bit of trouble fitting cycling shoes. I have long,
    > yet very low volume, feet and can never find a pair of shoes that

    give
    > me that snug, "fits like a glove" feel. If I go down a size, I get my
    > snugness but they're too short and my toes get squished up at the

    front
    > of the shoe. If I go up a size, the length is right but there's a bit
    > too much room.
    >
    > So far the closest to proper fit I've found are Sidi. Length is fine
    > but just a wee bit too roomy for my taste. Does anyone here have any
    > "tricks" to take up some extra room in the shoe? I don't want to wear
    > overly thick socks... How about placing an additional, very think
    > insole to take up some extra room?


    Yeah, you can do that, the stock insole is very thin. I have a pair of
    Sidi "Megas" that I use in the winter with thick socks and a neoprene
    insole. I like to also use them for very long rides (double centuries,
    etc.) in the summer for the extra toe room. I use a very thick foam
    insole (bought at drugstore). I cut the toe & heel part off, so it just
    fills up the volume around the arch. You can also pad the shoe tongue.
     
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  2. Cwazee Yeti

    Cwazee Yeti Guest

    Thanks a great idea, Peter... to use different footbeds and sock
    thicknesses to alter the fit during summer and winter. It sure beats
    having to buy 2 pairs of shoes for different seasons!

    I know this isn't an exact science but how much "wiggle room" should
    you typically having in the toebox? I once read that the rule of thumb
    (literally!!!) was to loosen all the straps/buckles of your shoes and
    slide your foot as far forward as possible. If you can fit one thumb
    width into the back (i.e., the heel) then you have a good length.

    And Peter, when you cut the toe & heel off your insoles do you feel the
    edges???

    Thanks

    CY

    Peter Cole wrote:
    >
    > Yeah, you can do that, the stock insole is very thin. I have a pair

    of
    > Sidi "Megas" that I use in the winter with thick socks and a neoprene
    > insole. I like to also use them for very long rides (double

    centuries,
    > etc.) in the summer for the extra toe room. I use a very thick foam
    > insole (bought at drugstore). I cut the toe & heel part off, so it

    just
    > fills up the volume around the arch. You can also pad the shoe tongue.
     
  3. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    Cwazee Yeti wrote:
    > Thanks a great idea, Peter... to use different footbeds and sock
    > thicknesses to alter the fit during summer and winter. It sure beats
    > having to buy 2 pairs of shoes for different seasons!
    >
    > I know this isn't an exact science but how much "wiggle room" should
    > you typically having in the toebox? I once read that the rule of

    thumb
    > (literally!!!) was to loosen all the straps/buckles of your shoes and
    > slide your foot as far forward as possible. If you can fit one thumb
    > width into the back (i.e., the heel) then you have a good length.


    I don't know exactly. I have "duck feet": wide toes, narrow heels, not
    much volume. I've found that on very long rides my feet swell and I
    need more width in the toe box. I think how much length you need is
    determined at least partially by your pedaling style. If you pedal "toe
    down" (like I do) the foot tends to slide forward and press the toes.

    > And Peter, when you cut the toe & heel off your insoles do you feel

    the
    > edges???


    No, not really. I notice it if I'm walking, but pedaling, all of the
    force is on the ball of the foot, so I don't feel toe or heel area
    unless it's being squeezed or slipping. I suppose you could chamfer the
    edges with a razor, I never bothered.
     
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