Re: So what's so good in a legume?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Mr. Natural-Health, Apr 18, 2006.

  1. David R. Throop wrote:

    > Over in sci.life-extension <[email protected]>, Doug Skrecky
    > <[email protected]> posts an article about how legume
    > consumption is the best predictor (of the foodgroups studied) of
    > survival in the elderly.
    >
    > >smoking. Legumes have been associated with long-lived food cultures such
    > >as the Japanese (soy, tofu, natto, miso), the Swedes (brown beans, peas),
    > >and the Mediterranean people (lentils, chickpeas, white beans).


    As usual, the kooks in smn don't have a clue as to what they are
    talking about. Nor, can you, I bet, rationalize correctly why a
    Low-Carb diet is important. Hint, it is not!!!

    The above quote from your above studies answers your question.
    Perhaps, you could try reading once in a while?

    Eating a Mediterranean style diet greatly improves longevity, according
    to numerous research studies. Legumes are known as the fourth food
    group in the Mediterranean diet: Fruit, Vegetables, Whole-Grains, and
    Legumes.

    Legumes in the Mediterranean style diet is roughly the equivalent of
    soy in the Japanese or Okinawian diet.

    There is no single factor in legumes that would account for all of
    their health benefits. But, the Okinawian diet classifies legumes under
    their Flavonoid Food Group. So, flavonoids would certainly be one
    major class of nutrients that are food in legumes. Onions and green
    tea, besides soy, provides a lot of flavonoids.
    --
    John Gohde,
    Achieving good Nutrition is an Art, NOT a Science!

    The nutrition of eating a healthy diet is a biological factor of the
    mind-body connection. Now, weighing in at 18 web pages, the
    Nutrition of a Healthy Diet is with more documentation and
    sharper terminology than ever before.
    http://naturalhealthperspective.com/food/
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    Mr. Natural-Health <[email protected]> wrote:
    >As usual, the kooks in smn don't have a clue as to what they are
    >talking about. Nor, can you, I bet, rationalize correctly why a
    >Low-Carb diet is important. Hint, it is not!!!


    plonk
     
  3. Kit

    Kit Guest

    Mr. Natural-Health wrote:
    > David R. Throop wrote:
    >
    > > Over in sci.life-extension <[email protected]>, Doug Skrecky
    > > <[email protected]> posts an article about how legume
    > > consumption is the best predictor (of the foodgroups studied) of
    > > survival in the elderly.
    > >
    > > >smoking. Legumes have been associated with long-lived food cultures such
    > > >as the Japanese (soy, tofu, natto, miso), the Swedes (brown beans, peas),
    > > >and the Mediterranean people (lentils, chickpeas, white beans).

    >
    > As usual, the kooks in smn don't have a clue as to what they are
    > talking about. Nor, can you, I bet, rationalize correctly why a
    > Low-Carb diet is important. Hint, it is not!!!
    >
    > The above quote from your above studies answers your question.
    > Perhaps, you could try reading once in a while?
    >
    > Eating a Mediterranean style diet greatly improves longevity, according
    > to numerous research studies. Legumes are known as the fourth food
    > group in the Mediterranean diet: Fruit, Vegetables, Whole-Grains, and
    > Legumes.
    >
    > Legumes in the Mediterranean style diet is roughly the equivalent of
    > soy in the Japanese or Okinawian diet.
    >
    > There is no single factor in legumes that would account for all of
    > their health benefits. But, the Okinawian diet classifies legumes under
    > their Flavonoid Food Group. So, flavonoids would certainly be one
    > major class of nutrients that are food in legumes. Onions and green
    > tea, besides soy, provides a lot of flavonoids.
    > --
    > John Gohde,
    > Achieving good Nutrition is an Art, NOT a Science!
    >
    > The nutrition of eating a healthy diet is a biological factor of the
    > mind-body connection. Now, weighing in at 18 web pages, the
    > Nutrition of a Healthy Diet is with more documentation and
    > sharper terminology than ever before.
    > http://naturalhealthperspective.com/food/
     
  4. Kit

    Kit Guest

    Mr. Natural-Health wrote:
    > David R. Throop wrote:
    >
    > > Over in sci.life-extension <[email protected]>, Doug Skrecky
    > > <[email protected]> posts an article about how legume
    > > consumption is the best predictor (of the foodgroups studied) of
    > > survival in the elderly.
    > >
    > > >smoking. Legumes have been associated with long-lived food cultures such
    > > >as the Japanese (soy, tofu, natto, miso), the Swedes (brown beans, peas),
    > > >and the Mediterranean people (lentils, chickpeas, white beans).

    >
    > As usual, the kooks in smn don't have a clue as to what they are
    > talking about. Nor, can you, I bet, rationalize correctly why a
    > Low-Carb diet is important. Hint, it is not!!!
    >
    > The above quote from your above studies answers your question.
    > Perhaps, you could try reading once in a while?
    >
    > Eating a Mediterranean style diet greatly improves longevity, according
    > to numerous research studies. Legumes are known as the fourth food
    > group in the Mediterranean diet: Fruit, Vegetables, Whole-Grains, and
    > Legumes.
    >
    > Legumes in the Mediterranean style diet is roughly the equivalent of
    > soy in the Japanese or Okinawian diet.
    >
    > There is no single factor in legumes that would account for all of
    > their health benefits. But, the Okinawian diet classifies legumes under
    > their Flavonoid Food Group. So, flavonoids would certainly be one
    > major class of nutrients that are food in legumes. Onions and green
    > tea, besides soy, provides a lot of flavonoids.
    > --
    > John Gohde,
    > Achieving good Nutrition is an Art, NOT a Science!
    >
    > The nutrition of eating a healthy diet is a biological factor of the
    > mind-body connection. Now, weighing in at 18 web pages, the
    > Nutrition of a Healthy Diet is with more documentation and
    > sharper terminology than ever before.
    > http://naturalhealthperspective.com/food/
     
  5. Kit

    Kit Guest

    Mr. Natural-Health wrote:
    > David R. Throop wrote:
    >
    > > Over in sci.life-extension <[email protected]>, Doug Skrecky
    > > <[email protected]> posts an article about how legume
    > > consumption is the best predictor (of the foodgroups studied) of
    > > survival in the elderly.
    > >
    > > >smoking. Legumes have been associated with long-lived food cultures such
    > > >as the Japanese (soy, tofu, natto, miso), the Swedes (brown beans, peas),
    > > >and the Mediterranean people (lentils, chickpeas, white beans).

    >
    > As usual, the kooks in smn don't have a clue as to what they are
    > talking about. Nor, can you, I bet, rationalize correctly why a
    > Low-Carb diet is important. Hint, it is not!!!
    >
    > The above quote from your above studies answers your question.
    > Perhaps, you could try reading once in a while?
    >
    > Eating a Mediterranean style diet greatly improves longevity, according
    > to numerous research studies. Legumes are known as the fourth food
    > group in the Mediterranean diet: Fruit, Vegetables, Whole-Grains, and
    > Legumes.
    >
    > Legumes in the Mediterranean style diet is roughly the equivalent of
    > soy in the Japanese or Okinawian diet.
    >
    > There is no single factor in legumes that would account for all of
    > their health benefits. But, the Okinawian diet classifies legumes under
    > their Flavonoid Food Group. So, flavonoids would certainly be one
    > major class of nutrients that are food in legumes. Onions and green
    > tea, besides soy, provides a lot of flavonoids.
    > --
    > John Gohde,
    > Achieving good Nutrition is an Art, NOT a Science!
    >
    > The nutrition of eating a healthy diet is a biological factor of the
    > mind-body connection. Now, weighing in at 18 web pages, the
    > Nutrition of a Healthy Diet is with more documentation and
    > sharper terminology than ever before.
    > http://naturalhealthperspective.com/food/
     
  6. Kit

    Kit Guest

    We couldn't find any results containing diabetes
    site:http://naturalhealthperspective.com.

    A low carb diet is extremely helpful for diabetes, prediabetes, and
    metabolic syndrome.
    High carbs be they "simple or complexed" cause arterial damages to the
    body's major organs: lungs, kidney,skin, heart. etc. I love legumes,
    but I must keep them to a minimum. Legumes are healthy. The
    Mediterrean countries also have many diabetes.
     
  7. Janet Wilder

    Janet Wilder Guest

    Kit wrote:

    > We couldn't find any results containing diabetes
    > site:http://naturalhealthperspective.com.
    >
    > A low carb diet is extremely helpful for diabetes, prediabetes, and
    > metabolic syndrome.
    > High carbs be they "simple or complexed" cause arterial damages to the
    > body's major organs: lungs, kidney,skin, heart. etc. I love legumes,
    > but I must keep them to a minimum. Legumes are healthy. The
    > Mediterrean countries also have many diabetes.
    >


    Legumes are also high in fiber. Some people have been educated to deduct
    more than 5 grams of dietary fiber per serving from total carbs of a
    food. Last endo counselled adding legumes to the food plan. We have one
    or two small servings per week, using canned beans that have been
    thoroughly rinsed in cold water, several times. We use chickpeas in
    salads and I'll make a side dish with tomato & black beans. It doesn't
    take a lot of legumes to make one feel full. Lentils are another dish we
    like. I usually use the little red ones adding onions and a little
    chicken broth flavoring to the cooking water. Again, small servings.
    DH's meter likes them. YMMV.

    --
    -----------
    Janet Wilder
    The Road Princess
    http://janetwilder.blogspot.com
     
  8. Kit wrote:

    > A low carb diet is extremely helpful for ... prediabetes, and metabolic syndrome.


    I can directly refrute that statement even though I had a thread on
    that topic which is barely a month old. :(

    A high-carb Mediterranean-style diet is extremely helpful for
    prediabetes and metabolic syndrome.

    "We should all eat like a Mediterranean
    9/22/2004"
    http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2004-09-21-mediterranean-usat_x.htm
    "In a separate study in the same journal, researchers from the Second
    University of Naples in Italy found that Mediterranean-style diets
    helped patients with "metabolic syndrome," which increases the risk of
    heart disease and diabetes and affects 1 in 4 American adults.

    People with the syndrome are fat around the middle, have high blood
    pressure and cholesterol deposits in their arteries, and do not
    properly process glucose. After two years, 44% of those on the
    Mediterranean diet still had features of metabolic syndrome, compared
    with 86% of others.

    This research confirms the results of earlier studies, experts say. A
    previous study of heart-attack survivors showed that the mortality rate
    was 70% lower among those who followed a prescribed Mediterranean diet
    compared with people on a low-fat diet.

    "The Mediterranean experience makes it clear that healthy eating is
    completely consistent with wonderful eating," says Walter Willett,
    chairman of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health.

    Yet getting more Americans to adopt healthy living will be a challenge,
    says Dario Giugliano, an author of the metabolic syndrome study.
    Experts say only 1 in 5 Americans eat the recommended five to nine
    servings of fruits and vegetables a day."

    Esposito K, Marfella R, Ciotola M, et al.
    Effect of a Mediterranean-style diet on endothelial dysfunction and
    markers of vascular inflammation in the metabolic syndrome: a
    randomized trial.
    JAMA. 2004;292:1440-1446.

    In order to view the full text and graphics of the following research
    paper online for FREE, you must be Registered as a Guest at JAMA. In
    the IE web browser, Java script must be turned on, and your privacy
    setting must be set to Medium High or lower. Clicking on the following
    hyperlinks will automatically prompt you to register at the Register
    for FREE content hyperlink. Then simply enter both your user name and
    password as if your were a subscriber to JAMA at the Sign In prompt so
    you can access this research paper online for FREE at JAMA.
    http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/292/12/1440

    Of course, if you choose to continue to hide your head in the sand ...
    --
    John Gohde,
    Achieving good Nutrition is an Art, NOT a Science!

    The nutrition of eating a healthy diet is a biological factor of the
    mind-body connection. Now, weighing in at 18 web pages, the
    Nutrition of a Healthy Diet is with more documentation and
    sharper terminology than ever before.
    http://naturalhealthperspective.com/food/
     
  9. Kit

    Kit Guest

    Diabetes,prediabetes, and metabolic syndrome represent varying degrees
    of a carbohydrate/metabolic dysfunction. Diabetes is an ancient
    disease. Fortunately, science is just now beginning to offer management
    insights and medications. Pardon the trite clique "make no mistake
    about it",diabetes is a deadly and highly destructive disease that
    requires constant carbohydrate control. A healthy diet is a point of
    reference. Does the person have renal, celiac, diabetes,food allergies
    etc.etc.? Hospitals have over 40 different basic diets. A frequently
    used expression is your mileage may vary, but the basics of diabetes is
    only that body's limited ability to metabolize carbohydrates . My
    "naturally healthy" diet is not a universal given for everyone.
     
  10. > There is no single factor in legumes that would account for all of
    > their health benefits. But, the Okinawian diet classifies legumes under
    > their Flavonoid Food Group. So, flavonoids would certainly be one
    > major class of nutrients that are food in legumes. Onions and green
    > tea, besides soy, provides a lot of flavonoids.


    Upon further research, flavonoids could not possibly be the major
    health factor since other food items contain significantly more
    flavonoids. Legumes are near the bottom of the list of flavonoid
    content. The biggies are soy, flaxseed, and arrowroot (used as a
    starch to thicken gravy).

    There is also very little research singling out the health benefits of
    just legumes. So, I would say a particular type of fiber is the major
    health benefit of eating legumes.
    --
    John Gohde,
    Achieving good Nutrition is an Art, NOT a Science!

    The nutrition of eating a healthy diet is a biological factor of the
    mind-body connection. Now, weighing in at 18 web pages, the
    Nutrition of a Healthy Diet is with more documentation and
    sharper terminology than ever before.
    http://naturalhealthperspective.com/food/
     
  11. "Mr. Natural-Health" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >> There is no single factor in legumes that would account for all of
    >> their health benefits. But, the Okinawian diet classifies legumes under
    >> their Flavonoid Food Group. So, flavonoids would certainly be one
    >> major class of nutrients that are food in legumes. Onions and green
    >> tea, besides soy, provides a lot of flavonoids.

    >
    > Upon further research, flavonoids could not possibly be the major
    > health factor since other food items contain significantly more
    > flavonoids. Legumes are near the bottom of the list of flavonoid
    > content. The biggies are soy, flaxseed, and arrowroot (used as a
    > starch to thicken gravy).
    >
    > There is also very little research singling out the health benefits of
    > just legumes. So, I would say a particular type of fiber is the major
    > health benefit of eating legumes.


    IF you are a vegetarian, which John Gohde-Ego-Machine isn't, then
    a combination of whole grains, which he espouses (sensibly) as really
    good stuff, and legumes, provides a good balance of essential amino
    acids. Carbs will be fine (except for morons into low carb).

    Add to that the iron content (which Monsewer IronyJustice would
    fart Beethoven about), which just needs some tomato to free up, and
    you can live healthily on the combination. IF you add some other
    veg, and a bit of dairy or egg. Med diet? Well I guess so.

    N.
     
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