Re: So what's so good in a legume?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Dick Malchik, Apr 20, 2006.

  1. Dick Malchik

    Dick Malchik Guest

    On 18 Apr 2006 00:22:11 -0500, [email protected] (David R. Throop)
    wrote:

    >Over in sci.life-extension <[email protected]>, Doug Skrecky
    ><[email protected]> posts an article about how legume
    >consumption is the best predictor (of the foodgroups studied) of
    >survival in the elderly.
    >
    >Peas? Peanuts? I hardly eat them any more. They are starchier than
    >I like. I'm trying to keep my carbs low, and I don't think of the
    >legumes of having much of anything in the way of phytonutrients. So
    >where's the benefit coming from?
    >
    >David Throop
    >
    >====



    I eat about 500gms-600gms(pre-cooked dry weight) of beans a week. A
    300gm batch lasts about 3 to 4 days. Most beans, lima, kidney, pinto,
    so on, are similar in nutritional content. Each 100 gms provide about
    22gms fiber, 55gms complex carbohydrates, and 25gms protein.

    The carbs are absorbed slowly, so I don't get BG spikes from them.
    Also, my internal hem%&#rhoids have almost dissapeared!

    I was diagnosed T2 May 2000 when I was scheduled for some rather
    extensive surgery to correct the 'rhoids. I'd also had a
    cauterization/colonoscopy to stop bleeding in 1996. The condition
    worsened, so surgery was scheduled in May 2000. In the pre-surgery
    labs, my fasting BG was about 200. I also weighed 205, at 5'7" on a
    lite frame. I was told to get the diabetes under control before I
    could have corrective surgery.

    This is when I did a 180-degree turn-around in diet and exercise. I
    dropped 65 lbs by diet and exercise. I maintained the good
    habits(mostly :| ) and years ago discovered the benefits of beans.
    They're great for getting carbs and fiber.

    Two weeks ago, I went to a colo-rectal surgeon (end-o-surgeon?)to look
    into the situation. I was thinking of getting the situation fixed,
    even though I haven't had a bad flare-up or severe bleeding in years.
    I was afraid it was a problem ready to expose itself, so my thinking
    was a pre-emptive strike.


    So what's so good in a legume?

    The surgeon said NO-rhoids! Internal scars and tags, but no need for
    any procedures! Oh, and my A1c is usually around 5, with the help of
    beans...

    Rich
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    Dick Malchik <[email protected]> wrote:
    [Story of avoiding rhoid surgery by losing weight, eating right.]

    >This is when I did a 180-degree turn-around in diet and exercise. I
    >dropped 65 lbs by diet and exercise. I maintained the good
    >habits(mostly :| ) and years ago discovered the benefits of beans.
    >They're great for getting carbs and fiber.


    Great for you!

    I am convinced that legumes are healthful. But I'm still wondering
    Why? How? Fiber is good, but we can get fiber from lots of sources.
    Low glycemic starches are certainly better than fast starches, but are
    they any better than MUFA or PUFA or protein as a calorie source?

    That is to say, besides the fiber and low-GI carbs, do legumes have
    any micronutrients that are uncommon in other food sources?

    Thanks
    David
     
  3. Dick Malchik

    Dick Malchik Guest

    On 20 Apr 2006 23:27:28 -0500, [email protected] (David R. Throop)
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    >Dick Malchik <[email protected]> wrote:
    >[Story of avoiding rhoid surgery by losing weight, eating right.]
    >
    > >This is when I did a 180-degree turn-around in diet and exercise. I
    > >dropped 65 lbs by diet and exercise. I maintained the good
    > >habits(mostly :| ) and years ago discovered the benefits of beans.
    > >They're great for getting carbs and fiber.

    >
    >Great for you!
    >
    >I am convinced that legumes are healthful. But I'm still wondering
    >Why? How? Fiber is good, but we can get fiber from lots of sources.
    >Low glycemic starches are certainly better than fast starches, but are
    >they any better than MUFA or PUFA or protein as a calorie source?
    >
    >That is to say, besides the fiber and low-GI carbs, do legumes have
    >any micronutrients that are uncommon in other food sources?
    >
    >Thanks
    >David



    David,

    Excluding the mixes and additives, what "normal" food common in the
    West has the same or more fiber than beans? I don't like taking any
    more pills and powders than I need. I'm sure there are some high fiber
    foods better than beans, but I haven't looked.

    Don't ask me about micronutrients. I don't believe that the trends and
    food fashions, even those that are correct, have much impact on the
    health of society. The result would be "microchanges." There would be
    a VERY big improvement in public health if people would only eat less
    and exercise.

    Rich
     
  4. David R. Throop wrote:

    > I am convinced that legumes are healthful. But I'm still wondering
    > Why? How? Fiber is good, but we can get fiber from lots of sources.


    Fiber, ... Fiber, Fiber!!!

    Duh, ... Legumes contain an ideal type of fiber.

    > Low glycemic starches are certainly better than fast starches, but are
    > they any better than MUFA or PUFA or protein as a calorie source?


    You problem is that you don't have a clue about the basics of nutrition
    for a NORMAL person, let alone for a diabetic.

    Yeah, ... right, sure: Let's us get all our caloric needs met by an
    all legume diet, or from an all MUFA diet. Or, shall we all pig out on
    vegetable oil?

    You have my condolences.
     
  5. http://food.naturalhealthperspective.com/bioavailability.html
    " Bioavailability of Nutrients - The Nutrition of Micronutrients"

    This web page contains a listing of Micronutrients by Food Groups.

    > > I am convinced that legumes are healthful. But I'm still wondering
    > > Why? How? Fiber is good, but we can get fiber from lots of sources.

    >
    > Fiber, ... Fiber, Fiber!!!
    >
    > Duh, ... Legumes contain an ideal type of fiber.


    Tovar J. Bioavailability of carbohydrates in legumes: digestible and
    indigestible fractions. Arch Latinoam Nutr. 1996 Dec;44(4 Suppl
    1):36S-40S. PMID: 9137637
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=9137637
    ABSTRACT: "Despite their important contribution to seed weight,
    carbohydrates in pulses have received limited attention. However,
    experimental evidence accumulated during the last two decades indicate
    that legumes are rich sources of slowly digestible starch promoting
    moderate postprandial glycernic and insulinemic responses. Although the
    reasons for this phenomenon are not completely understood, some
    intrinsic properties of the starch itself and the microstructure of
    cotyledon cells appear to determine much of the slow release character.
    This beneficial feature is rather sensitive to thermal and mechanical
    processing. A minimum of 10% of the starch occurring in common beans
    and lentils escapes digestion and absorption in the normal small
    intestine, and is therefore referred to as "resistant starch". This
    material consists mainly of retrograded amylose fractions generated
    upon cooling of wet-heated pulses. Physically inaccessible starch
    fractions resulting from cotyledon microstructural properties may also
    contribute to incomplete digestibility, accounting for up to 40% of the
    indigestible starch. These indigestible starch fractions are fermented
    in the large intestine generating gases and volatile fatty acids,
    compounds that have important influence on the physiology of the
    colonic mucosa and peripheral metabolism."
    --
    John Gohde,
    Achieving good Nutrition is an Art, NOT a Science!

    The nutrition of eating a healthy diet is a biological factor of the
    mind-body connection. Now, weighing in at 18 web pages, the
    Nutrition of a Healthy Diet is with more documentation and
    sharper terminology than ever before.
    http://naturalhealthperspective.com/food/
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    Dick Malchik <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Excluding the mixes and additives, what "normal" food common in the
    >West has the same or more fiber than beans? I don't like taking any
    >more pills and powders than I need. I'm sure there are some high fiber
    >foods better than beans, but I haven't looked.


    Dick,

    Fair question, and I don't know. I get my fiber from
    * leafy greens (lettuce and spinach, some swiss chard, turnip greens
    mostly)
    * Cruciferous vegetables (cabbage, broccolli)
    * Psyllium

    Agreed, psyllium is not part of the common western diet. (tho my
    supermarket now sells it cheap, in bulk.) But I want to get more than
    30 g/day of soluble fiber. It's knocked my cholesterol down so much -
    total cholesterol 122. When I went to the Natl Cholesterol Education
    Project's risk estimator, it wouldn't let me put in that value - they
    only calculate risk for people with TC of 130 and above.

    When I first started getting my blood glucose under control, on Rick
    (David) Mendoza's recommendation I was fixing Chana Dal (a lentil)
    regularly. But I never really liked it that much, even though,
    indeed, it doesn't spike my bg.

    Legumes have slow digesting starches. That slowly digest anaerobicly
    in the lower GI, generating methane. My psyllium, leafy greens and
    crucifers don't make me fart like beans do. Plus, I like them better.

    Also, I've been adding a heaping teaspoon of cocoa to my psyllium /
    lecithin / Crystal light mix. (PubMed 16505260) Where it tastes quite
    good. Somehow, I can't imagine any way of adding cocoa to legumes
    that would be pallatible. Though I'm open to suggestion.

    David Throop
     
  7. "David R. Throop" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > Also, I've been adding a heaping teaspoon of cocoa to my psyllium /
    > lecithin / Crystal light mix. (PubMed 16505260) Where it tastes quite
    > good. Somehow, I can't imagine any way of adding cocoa to legumes
    > that would be pallatible. Though I'm open to suggestion.


    I often add cocoa to bean "nacho" sauce. Beans, tomato, garlic, chilli,
    ground coriander, oil, cocoa powder. [And some water]. It's hard to
    proportions wrong as far as flavour is concerned. Cooks slow and for
    a long time. Sometimes add shredded cabbage. Probably half is beans,
    25% tomato. Cocoa maybe 2 teaspoons/person. The sweet flavour from
    tomato, coriander and cabbage complements the bitterness of cocoa and
    the more bland flavour of the beans.

    Be careful use cocoa, not something with cocoa and sugar. Some cocoa
    products are > 50% sugar.

    With corn chips if that suits you. With just about anything you like.

    N.
     
  8. David R. Throop wrote:

    > Legumes have slow digesting starches. That slowly digest anaerobicly
    > in the lower GI, generating methane. My psyllium, leafy greens and
    > crucifers don't make me fart like beans do. ...


    Truth be known. When all is said and done. The primary reason some
    kooks are against legumes is that they have a phobia about breaking
    wind in public.

    It is about time that kooks came to the realization that they indeed do
    have a physical body.

    Not only do NORMAL humans beings pass gas just like dogs do, but they
    own a physical body that requires lots of physical exercise.

    You kooks have my condolences.
     
  9. "Mr. Natural-Health" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > David R. Throop wrote:
    >
    >> Legumes have slow digesting starches. That slowly digest anaerobicly
    >> in the lower GI, generating methane. My psyllium, leafy greens and
    >> crucifers don't make me fart like beans do. ...

    >
    > Truth be known. When all is said and done. The primary reason some
    > kooks are against legumes is that they have a phobia about breaking
    > wind in public.


    Is that true? Throop said it, and he may well not be a kook. What about
    the others? Pythagoras eschewed beans. He was a bit odd, but I wouldn't
    call him a kook.

    > It is about time that kooks came to the realization that they indeed do
    > have a physical body.


    Come off it Johnny, your facetiousness and arrogance are making you
    lazy. VERY few individuals don't realise they have a physical body!

    The issues are about acceptance, and management of having, or being
    a body. Or in the words of Socrates, "by the age of 40, a man is a
    physician or a fool".

    > Not only do NORMAL humans beings pass gas just like dogs do, but they
    > own a physical body that requires lots of physical exercise.


    Dogs fart when they have to. They can be very sneaky. Human farting is
    somewhat more culturally compliant. Having relationships with dogs
    and humans, I can certainly tell the difference in this department. AND
    there a definitely some things that dogs should not be fed...

    "Exercise", too, is something different for dogs. They just "gotta do it"
    (arf, arf, yeah, yeah), and they seem to enjoy it!

    I don't understand the reticence many humans have for "exercise"
    (aka activity to involves some duration and effort). It is a question
    that interests me professionally.

    Speaking for myself, I find enjoyment in it, so maybe I'm closer to the
    canines than the grumps. I worry about humans who do take exercise,
    but as an ordeal.

    > You kooks have my condolences.


    Sympathy from John is like parking tickets from some grumpy cop.

    They don't "make anyone's day".

    Compassion and even support would possibly make some difference
    to someone, someday.

    N.
     
  10. RBR

    RBR Guest

    Neryl Chyphes wrote:
    >
    > Sympathy from John is like parking tickets from some grumpy cop.
    >
    > They don't "make anyone's day".


    He has *my* condolences.

    >
    > Compassion and even support would possibly make some difference
    > to someone, someday.


    Compassion and support from Johnny Boy??? You're new here, aren't you?
    Nice thought though.

    RBR
     
  11. > Truth be known. When all is said and done. The primary reason some
    > kooks are against legumes is that they have a phobia about breaking
    > wind in public.
     
  12. Neryl Chyphes wrote:

    > Sympathy from John is like parking tickets from some grumpy cop.
    >
    > They don't "make anyone's day".
    >
    > Compassion and even support would possibly make some difference
    > to someone, someday.


    In combat, the best defense is a good offense.

    Just my opinion, but you dorks are a just bunch of whining losers. :)
     
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