Re: Switching from cycling to running



P

Parbs

Guest
"Tamyka Bell" wrote
> dave wrote:
> >
> > Running is fun???

>
> Sure, it's easy too! :p
>

Next you'll be telling us swimming is enjoyable and water is good for you :p

Parbs
 
T

Tamyka Bell

Guest
Resound wrote:
>
> >> No, it's simple. It's a small, but profoundly important distinction.

> >
> > Do you think it's simple? I don't think it's simple. There's a lot to it
> > and a lot of people do it with really bad form. I think a lot of people
> > don't realise how complex and technical running truly is. But once you
> > figure out the right way for YOU to do it, it's easy!
> >
> > Tam

>
> Ok, granted. Even as a non-runner, I see people running (especially women,
> for some reason) with realy odd running styles. I've tried running once
> recently, and I plan to have another go. I made the mistake of taking my
> girlfriend's dog with me, thinking I'd run out of go before him even though
> he's only a fairly small dog. Nope. Very tired little dog legs,very quickly.
> He barely had the energy to bark at my cats when we got home. Little sod.


That's cute. Did you carry him? I've had to carry George home before,
he's heavier than he looks, at the time he was 9.6 kg. He just stopped
and wouldn't budge, lay down in the shade!

I read in Runners World (US edition - yep, I used to subscribe to both)
about an ultra trail runner who would log 50-100km trg runs (not weekly,
that's one hit) and take his dog. He said it was a pain in the bum
because he had to carry so much extra water for the dog. But the
companionship was nice. The dog wanted to stay with him, but after
about 20km or so he would make the dog lie down for a rest, give him
water, and head off, collect him on the way back!

Tam
 
P

Parbs

Guest
Tamyka Bell wrote in message
>
> It's all true! The best thing about swimming is that if your technique
> sucks, the sinking provides instant feedback! :p
>
> You know, trapeze is very good for core strength...
>

I can see the sense in that, I was trying to convince the boss that this would be a good team building exercise
http://www.trapeze.gearzone.com.au/corporate.html

but I work with a bunch of wusses.

Parbs
 
T

Tamyka Bell

Guest
Parbs wrote:
>
> Tamyka Bell wrote in message
> >
> > It's all true! The best thing about swimming is that if your technique
> > sucks, the sinking provides instant feedback! :p
> >
> > You know, trapeze is very good for core strength...
> >

> I can see the sense in that, I was trying to convince the boss that this would be a good team building exercise
> http://www.trapeze.gearzone.com.au/corporate.html
>
> but I work with a bunch of wusses.
>
> Parbs


You're in a harness, over a tramp, what can happen?! (aside from
smacking your head on the bar, etc.) That looks like the same rig that
Flying Trapeze Australia uses. Go with them instead, because then you
could drag your colleagues to Byron Bay for a 5-day intensive!

Tam
 
P

Parbs

Guest
"Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
> You're in a harness, over a tramp, what can happen?!


Break a nail, raise a sweat, that sort of thing.

Parbs - whose not adverse to hanging about in ropes occasionally
 

hippy

New Member
Sep 5, 2003
1,806
0
0
43
>Tamyka Bell
>(Bah, don't trust my judgement, I use the net to pick
>up guys)

hahahahahaha LMAO! What's his name? :p

BEWARE: hippy still reads a.b. :p

hippy
 
M

Marty

Guest
Carl Brewer wrote:
> On 15 May 2005 17:12:10 -0700, "Absent Husband"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>>Yeah - do both!!
>>
>>I'm sure I've read research reports (proper ones - control groups, etc,
>>all used) - that show that runners that incorporate cycling into
>>training are better than 'runners only'; and cyclists that incorporate
>>a small amount of running are better cyclists.

>
>
> I'm sure I haven't. Please cite your sources :)
> And were the subjects of the research already well trained
> cyclists/runners, or not? that make a *huge* difference
> to the result of the experiment.
>
>

We have a race in my town which is the second oldest race in WA and
offers some of the best prize money and last year it was won by a
triathlete in his first ever road race.

Marty
 
M

Marty

Guest
Tamyka Bell wrote:
> Carl Brewer wrote:
>
>>On 15 May 2005 17:12:10 -0700, "Absent Husband"
>><[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Yeah - do both!!
>>>
>>>I'm sure I've read research reports (proper ones - control groups, etc,
>>>all used) - that show that runners that incorporate cycling into
>>>training are better than 'runners only'; and cyclists that incorporate
>>>a small amount of running are better cyclists.

>>
>>I'm sure I haven't. Please cite your sources :)
>>And were the subjects of the research already well trained
>>cyclists/runners, or not? that make a *huge* difference
>>to the result of the experiment.

>
>
> Actually I'm pretty sure the studies have shown that cycling can't
> possibly help running. However, I became a better runner from cycling, I
> figure it was because I was overreaching in my running training whereas
> recovering from my cycling training, therefore it was a cardio effect.
>
> As for running helping cycling, I'm pretty sure it's all bad. The top
> triathletes are generally slower than top cyclists, and I've found that
> my cycling hasn't gotten much worse since I stopped training, and I
> cycle much stronger when I haven't been running. Probably would help
> their flexibility though. Plus running is fun, and you can do it cross
> country at night without lights.
>
> Tam


Canoeing helps my swimming but swimming doesn't help my canoeing. Horse
riding has my survival skills. (Tuck and roll!)

Marty
 
M

Marty

Guest
dave wrote:
> Tamyka Bell wrote:
>
>> Carl Brewer wrote:
>>
>>> On 15 May 2005 17:12:10 -0700, "Absent Husband"
>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>> Yeah - do both!!
>>>>
>>>> I'm sure I've read research reports (proper ones - control groups, etc,
>>>> all used) - that show that runners that incorporate cycling into
>>>> training are better than 'runners only'; and cyclists that incorporate
>>>> a small amount of running are better cyclists.
>>>
>>>
>>> I'm sure I haven't. Please cite your sources :)
>>> And were the subjects of the research already well trained
>>> cyclists/runners, or not? that make a *huge* difference
>>> to the result of the experiment.

>>
>>
>>
>> Actually I'm pretty sure the studies have shown that cycling can't
>> possibly help running. However, I became a better runner from cycling, I
>> figure it was because I was overreaching in my running training whereas
>> recovering from my cycling training, therefore it was a cardio effect.
>>
>> As for running helping cycling, I'm pretty sure it's all bad. The top
>> triathletes are generally slower than top cyclists, and I've found that
>> my cycling hasn't gotten much worse since I stopped training, and I
>> cycle much stronger when I haven't been running. Probably would help
>> their flexibility though. Plus running is fun, and you can do it cross
>> country at night without lights.
>>
>> Tam

>
>
> Running is fun???


Running isn't fun, it just feels really great when you stop.

Marty
 
M

Marty

Guest
Resound wrote:
> "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
>>dave wrote:
>>
>>>Tamyka Bell wrote:

>>
>><snip>
>>
>>>>As for running helping cycling, I'm pretty sure it's all bad. The top
>>>>triathletes are generally slower than top cyclists, and I've found that
>>>>my cycling hasn't gotten much worse since I stopped training, and I
>>>>cycle much stronger when I haven't been running. Probably would help
>>>>their flexibility though. Plus running is fun, and you can do it cross
>>>>country at night without lights.
>>>>
>>>>Tam
>>>
>>>Running is fun???

>>
>>Sure, it's easy too! :p
>>
>>Tam

>
>
> No, it's simple. It's a small, but profoundly important distinction.
>
>


Running was the start of my sporting life. I chose running because it
was the cheapest at a time when I didn't have much money. You only need
a pair of good shoes.
13 years later I still don't have any money because I spend it on bikes,
canoes, wetsuits...........

Marty
 
B

BrettM

Guest
Tamyka Bell <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

> Resound wrote:
>>
>> >> No, it's simple. It's a small, but profoundly important
>> >> distinction.
>> >
>> > Do you think it's simple? I don't think it's simple. There's a lot
>> > to it and a lot of people do it with really bad form. I think a lot
>> > of people don't realise how complex and technical running truly is.
>> > But once you figure out the right way for YOU to do it, it's easy!
>> >
>> > Tam

>>
>> Ok, granted. Even as a non-runner, I see people running (especially
>> women, for some reason) with realy odd running styles. I've tried
>> running once recently, and I plan to have another go. I made the
>> mistake of taking my girlfriend's dog with me, thinking I'd run out
>> of go before him even though he's only a fairly small dog. Nope. Very
>> tired little dog legs,very quickly. He barely had the energy to bark
>> at my cats when we got home. Little sod.

>
> That's cute. Did you carry him? I've had to carry George home before,
> he's heavier than he looks, at the time he was 9.6 kg. He just stopped
> and wouldn't budge, lay down in the shade!
>
> I read in Runners World (US edition - yep, I used to subscribe to
> both) about an ultra trail runner who would log 50-100km trg runs (not
> weekly, that's one hit) and take his dog. He said it was a pain in the
> bum because he had to carry so much extra water for the dog. But the
> companionship was nice. The dog wanted to stay with him, but after
> about 20km or so he would make the dog lie down for a rest, give him
> water, and head off, collect him on the way back!
>
> Tam
>


Had to carry a 73kg Rottweiler/Great Dane cross a couple of kilometres
along a beach after it tore it's crutiate (?) ligment. Silly bugger
used to try to spin around after crabs and actually had to have surgery
to both back legs within 6 months of each other. The most docile soppy
b*gger of a dog you could ever have but jeez he used to put the wind up
other dogs/horses/mormons and all he wanted to do was run with them.
One of the quickest dogs I've ever seen (used to run down galloping
horses, I think he just thought they were big dogs)

Still miss him.

Cheers

BrettM
 
D

dave

Guest
Parbs wrote:
> "Tamyka Bell" wrote
>
>>dave wrote:
>>
>>>Running is fun???

>>
>>Sure, it's easy too! :p
>>

>
> Next you'll be telling us swimming is enjoyable and water is good for you :p
>
> Parbs
>
>

I run a little. Cos it pays off aerobically. And its quick.. A quick
3 miles takes about the same time as warming up on the bike. So I do
it. And have for many years. Fun it is not. Its a chore. More like
cleaning the toilet than washing the dishes

Dave
 
T

TimC

Guest
On Mon, 16 May 2005 at 09:56 GMT, Marty (aka Bruce)
was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
> dave wrote:
>> Running is fun???

>
> Running isn't fun, it just feels really great when you stop.


I don't believe that. Although, it does suspiciously sound like the
reason why I am doing my PhD. Tamyka? You with me on this one?

--
TimC -- http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/staff/tconnors/
You must realize that the computer has it in for you. The irrefutable
proof of this is that the computer always does what you tell it to do.
 
R

RobWoozle

Guest
>
> Ahhhh, but as far as I am concerned, they are not RUNNERS, they are

just
> TRAINING. If they were runners, they'd like doing it. Me, I grin like

an
> idiot and say hi to everyone, even initiating conversations with the

old
> guys running home from work with backpacks on, etc (it's a good

excuse to
> slow down for a bit). But I'm the same when cycling, I guess. Once I

had a
> conversation with a guy in a kayak on the river.
>
> As for the cyclists smiling/saying hello/nodding... well, not in

Brisbane.
> Small groups of social riders, yes. Big bunches ignore the people

they're
> mowing down, commuters on mtbs are too busy trying to prove that they

can
> go just as fast as road bikes (regardless of the conditions) with

heads
> down, bums up and too bad if you step into their path, etc etc. On a

few
> occasions my hello has startled someone so much they nearly stacked

it.
>
> Tam



I concur. Runners generally always say g'day. Mountain Bikers always
seem to do the same as well. I have pretty much given up waving or
saying hello to those on road bikes - maybe it's the fact that they are
concentrating hard on the road...or maybe they are concerned that there
isn't enough carbon fibre on my road bike ;-)

Swimmers I can forgive for not talking ;-)

Rob
 
T

Tamyka Bell

Guest
On Tue, 17 May 2005, TimC wrote:

> On Mon, 16 May 2005 at 09:56 GMT, Marty (aka Bruce)
> was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
>> dave wrote:
>>> Running is fun???

>>
>> Running isn't fun, it just feels really great when you stop.

>
> I don't believe that. Although, it does suspiciously sound like the
> reason why I am doing my PhD. Tamyka? You with me on this one?


100% with you there! (er, +/- 1%)
 
T

Tamyka Bell

Guest
On Tue, 16 May 2005, RobWoozle wrote:

>>
>> Ahhhh, but as far as I am concerned, they are not RUNNERS, they are

> just
>> TRAINING. If they were runners, they'd like doing it. Me, I grin like

> an
>> idiot and say hi to everyone, even initiating conversations with the

> old
>> guys running home from work with backpacks on, etc (it's a good

> excuse to
>> slow down for a bit). But I'm the same when cycling, I guess. Once I

> had a
>> conversation with a guy in a kayak on the river.
>>
>> As for the cyclists smiling/saying hello/nodding... well, not in

> Brisbane.
>> Small groups of social riders, yes. Big bunches ignore the people

> they're
>> mowing down, commuters on mtbs are too busy trying to prove that they

> can
>> go just as fast as road bikes (regardless of the conditions) with

> heads
>> down, bums up and too bad if you step into their path, etc etc. On a

> few
>> occasions my hello has startled someone so much they nearly stacked

> it.
>>
>> Tam

>
>
> I concur. Runners generally always say g'day. Mountain Bikers always
> seem to do the same as well. I have pretty much given up waving or
> saying hello to those on road bikes - maybe it's the fact that they are
> concentrating hard on the road...or maybe they are concerned that there
> isn't enough carbon fibre on my road bike ;-)
>
> Swimmers I can forgive for not talking ;-)
>
> Rob
>
>



*glug* *gurgle* Hey there *splutter* *gasp* Rob, how *few strokes* *glug*
you doin'? *drowns*

Tam
 
C

Carl Brewer

Guest
On 16 May 2005 18:00:48 -0700, "RobWoozle" <[email protected]>
wrote:


>Swimmers I can forgive for not talking ;-)


swimmer aer far too busy perving on the girl they're
followng to waste energy talking


>
>Rob
 
A

Absent Husband

Guest
SShhhhhhh - don't tell 'em that!!

At Hibiscus pool (Mt Gravatt, Brisbane), most mornings during 'swim
season' the Qld women's water polo squad would be doing their lap
swimming sessions. And all the guys would be fighting over who would be
swimming in the lanes next tothem.....

Well, not literally. But always noticed that there'd be, like, 6
swimmers using the lane next to them. And a max of 2 swimmers in all
the others. I was always in one of the '2 swimmer' lanes - but that was
mainly because I resembled an oil tanker chugging down the lane, and
people quickly get sick of overtaking....

Cheers,
Absent Husband (who doesn't miss the icy cool water...)
 
T

Tamyka Bell

Guest
On Tue, 16 May 2005, Absent Husband wrote:

> SShhhhhhh - don't tell 'em that!!
>
> At Hibiscus pool (Mt Gravatt, Brisbane), most mornings during 'swim
> season' the Qld women's water polo squad would be doing their lap
> swimming sessions. And all the guys would be fighting over who would be
> swimming in the lanes next tothem.....
>
> Well, not literally. But always noticed that there'd be, like, 6
> swimmers using the lane next to them. And a max of 2 swimmers in all
> the others. I was always in one of the '2 swimmer' lanes - but that was
> mainly because I resembled an oil tanker chugging down the lane, and
> people quickly get sick of overtaking....
>
> Cheers,
> Absent Husband (who doesn't miss the icy cool water...)


You boys are too cynical. Next you'll be telling me that the boys who
wheelsuck me are doing it for the views and not because I'm a faster
cyclist.

(Hehehe careful with your reply, Absent Husband, I seem to remember you
wheelsucking!)

Tam
 

warrwych

New Member
Jun 7, 2004
1,009
0
0
Tamyka Bell said:
You boys are too cynical. Next you'll be telling me that the boys who
wheelsuck me are doing it for the views and not because I'm a faster
cyclist.

(Hehehe careful with your reply, Absent Husband, I seem to remember you
wheelsucking!)

Tam

it took me a while to work out why the some of the guys I ride with have suggested I stand while climbing.. and why I always tow them to the top
:rolleyes: :rolleyes: