Re: The benefit of megadoses of B-vitamins



D

Delete the D

Guest
Mooshie peas <[email protected]> writes:
[...]
>You must post an example of a vitamin supplement
>being needed by a normal healthy adult eating a
>varied wholefood eucaloric diet with regular
>moderate exercise.

[...]

Some say the evidence for taking vitamins is
lacking.

They say

"if cavemen evolved to survive on whole foods,
moderate exercise and calories, that's good
enough for us too".

They say

"only the fittest survived and we should live
how they lived, eat what they ate and exercise
how they exercised".

However, as I write this in August of 2003, I'm
aware of MORE EVIDENCE THAT EVOLUTION CONSERVED
THE BENEFITS OF B VITAMINS than a Neanderthal's
knuckle dragging lifestyle.

B vitamins have been found, in scientifically
controlled studies, to extend the life spans of
both fruit flies AND rodents, whose last common
ancestor is thought to have lived HUNDREDS OF
MILLIONS OF YEARS AGO, when the ancient sea beds
were ruled by the mighty trilobite and WAY before
any man walked the earth.

It's remarkable that the same vitamins work in two
species so different. Bugs and mammals, small and
large, airborne and terrestrial.

Can we deny the possibility that the beneficial
chemical pathways acted up by B vitamins have been
conserved during hundreds of millions of years of
evolution?

Perhaps you're wondering which B vitamins I'm
writing about.

B5 and B6 increased life spans in both fruit flies
and rodents, from 10% to 28%, each.

Studies have also found that B5 and B6 improve
health in humans.

All this is in Michael Price's excellent Longevity
Report.

On the other hand, I know of no studies that found
that whole foods, moderate exercise or calories
extend life span.

Where are they?

Even if one or two can be found, how compelling
are they? Were they done on very different
species, by different researchers and at different
times?

And, if B5 and B6 have more evidence, shouldn't we
prefer them?

I think so.

Thanks,
Kingsley

--
--
Kingsley G. Morse Jr.
 
M

Mooshie peas

Guest
On 26 Aug 2003 14:55:06 -0700, [email protected] (Delete the "D")
posted:

>Mooshie peas <[email protected]> writes:
>[...]
>>You must post an example of a vitamin supplement
>>being needed by a normal healthy adult eating a
>>varied wholefood eucaloric diet with regular
>>moderate exercise.

>[...]
>
>Some say the evidence for taking vitamins is
>lacking.
>
>They say
>
> "if cavemen evolved to survive on whole foods,
> moderate exercise and calories, that's good
> enough for us too".
>
>They say
>
> "only the fittest survived and we should live
> how they lived, eat what they ate and exercise
> how they exercised".
>
>However, as I write this in August of 2003, I'm
>aware of MORE EVIDENCE THAT EVOLUTION CONSERVED
>THE BENEFITS OF B VITAMINS than a Neanderthal's
>knuckle dragging lifestyle.


Sorry, how did a Neanderthal's (no relation to H sapiens) knuckle
dragging lifestyle CONSERVE THE BENEFITS OF B VITAMINS?

>B vitamins have been found, in scientifically
>controlled studies, to extend the life spans of
>both fruit flies AND rodents, whose last common
>ancestor is thought to have lived HUNDREDS OF
>MILLIONS OF YEARS AGO, when the ancient sea beds
>were ruled by the mighty trilobite and WAY before
>any man walked the earth.


And the significance of this esotric finding?

>It's remarkable that the same vitamins work in two
>species so different. Bugs and mammals, small and
>large, airborne and terrestrial.


Well do they? Is it? What's the relevance to other organisms?

>Can we deny the possibility that the beneficial
>chemical pathways acted up by B vitamins have been
>conserved during hundreds of millions of years of
>evolution?


And they would be? Look if B vitamins were so vital, why do you think
that these organisms didn't evolve to produce their own?

>Perhaps you're wondering which B vitamins I'm
>writing about.


Not particularly. Vitamins are only essential molecules that were so
readily available that no organism found any survival pressure to make
them for themselves. Look at ascorbic acid. Humans and guinea pigs are
about the only organisms that this is a vitamin for.

>B5 and B6 increased life spans in both fruit flies
>and rodents, from 10% to 28%, each.


So?

>Studies have also found that B5 and B6 improve
>health in humans.


Only when treating deficiencies. Which with industrial food production
and overconsumption are rife today.

>All this is in Michael Price's excellent Longevity
>Report.


But apparently nowhere does it show any benefit from supplementation
to healthy adults who eat a varied wholefood diet. A rare thing in the
West, BTW.

>On the other hand, I know of no studies that found
>that whole foods, moderate exercise or calories
>extend life span.


From what? Compared with what?

>Where are they?


All around you. Humans we are talking about.
Mice increase lifespan from their three years (or so) by being
severely calorie restricted. This is thought to have very little
relevance to humans.

>Even if one or two can be found, how compelling
>are they? Were they done on very different
>species, by different researchers and at different
>times?


Humans, remember. Optimal nutrition gives optimal health, happiness,
and longevity, in the experience of the human race.
If you can show any benefit from supplementation of an optimal diet,
then I'm convinced.

>And, if B5 and B6 have more evidence, shouldn't we
>prefer them?


To what? You seem to be craving some magic bullet, when the truth is
staring you in the face.

>I think so.


I'm sure you do. Good luck on your quest for the holy grail :)