Re: The viability threshold

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com, Jul 19, 2005.

  1. Phil Scott wrote:
    > .
    >
    > When one more straw on the camels back breaks it.
    > You could call that the 'viability threshold'
    >
    >
    > Here are some minor but obvious examples. There is no need to
    > hair split these for obvious exceptions. the examples are
    > used to illustrate a more general principle:
    >
    >
    > Say a given person needs 2500 calories a day to be healthy...
    > and some of it has to be fruits and vegitables.
    >
    > Then his income is cut 10%.. he now can afford 2,000 calories
    > a day, but its mostly greasey fast food and no fruits and
    > vegitables... he will have crossed the 'viability threshold'..
    > that tiny change in income can take him from progressing and
    > viable...to slowly going south...



    COMMENT:

    The problem with this ridiculous exercise is that "greasy fast foods"
    are always more expensive than whole healthy bread, eggs, canned goods,
    and produce. Why? Because you have to pay the doofuses who flip the
    burgers, AND their bosses, AND the franchise, etc, etc, etc.

    Go actually price bread, canned meat, eggs, and #10 tin cans of canned
    fruit and vegetables and beans (which are perfectly nutritious). Meals
    can be made for 30 cents. If you get past 50 cents, you're being a
    luxury hog.

    Of course, you have to do the work yourself.

    SBH
     
    Tags:


  2. Phil Scott

    Phil Scott Guest

    "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com" <[email protected]> wrote
    in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > Phil Scott wrote:
    > > .
    > >
    > > When one more straw on the camels back breaks it.
    > > You could call that the 'viability threshold'
    > >
    > >
    > > Here are some minor but obvious examples. There is no

    need to
    > > hair split these for obvious exceptions. the examples are
    > > used to illustrate a more general principle:
    > >
    > >
    > > Say a given person needs 2500 calories a day to be

    healthy...
    > > and some of it has to be fruits and vegitables.
    > >
    > > Then his income is cut 10%.. he now can afford 2,000

    calories
    > > a day, but its mostly greasey fast food and no fruits and
    > > vegitables... he will have crossed the 'viability

    threshold'..
    > > that tiny change in income can take him from progressing

    and
    > > viable...to slowly going south...

    >
    >
    > COMMENT:
    >
    > The problem with this ridiculous exercise is that "greasy

    fast foods"
    > are always more expensive than whole healthy bread, eggs,

    canned goods,
    > and produce. Why? Because you have to pay the doofuses who

    flip the
    > burgers, AND their bosses, AND the franchise, etc, etc, etc.


    Hey no need to be a jerk...of course the guy has
    options..but that not the point.. the point is clearly stated
    and given..ones own error or combination of other factors can
    push a person south across the viablitiy threshold.

    duhhh



    >
    > Go actually price bread, canned meat, eggs, and #10 tin cans

    of canned
    > fruit and vegetables and beans (which are perfectly

    nutritious). Meals
    > can be made for 30 cents. If you get past 50 cents, you're

    being a
    > luxury hog.
    >
    > Of course, you have to do the work yourself.
    >
    > SBH
    >
     
  3. "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > Phil Scott wrote:
    >> .
    >>
    >> When one more straw on the camels back breaks it.
    >> You could call that the 'viability threshold'
    >>
    >>
    >> Here are some minor but obvious examples. There is no need to
    >> hair split these for obvious exceptions. the examples are
    >> used to illustrate a more general principle:
    >>
    >>
    >> Say a given person needs 2500 calories a day to be healthy...
    >> and some of it has to be fruits and vegitables.
    >>
    >> Then his income is cut 10%.. he now can afford 2,000 calories
    >> a day, but its mostly greasey fast food and no fruits and
    >> vegitables... he will have crossed the 'viability threshold'..
    >> that tiny change in income can take him from progressing and
    >> viable...to slowly going south...

    >
    >
    > COMMENT:
    >
    > The problem with this ridiculous exercise is that "greasy fast foods"
    > are always more expensive than whole healthy bread, eggs, canned goods,
    > and produce. Why? Because you have to pay the doofuses who flip the
    > burgers, AND their bosses, AND the franchise, etc, etc, etc.
    >
    > Go actually price bread, canned meat, eggs, and #10 tin cans of canned
    > fruit and vegetables and beans (which are perfectly nutritious). Meals
    > can be made for 30 cents. If you get past 50 cents, you're being a
    > luxury hog.
    >
    > Of course, you have to do the work yourself.


    Also the shoplifting--to get healthy meals for under 50 cents.

    GWC
     
  4. George Cherry wrote:

    > > Go actually price bread, canned meat, eggs, and #10 tin cans of canned
    > > fruit and vegetables and beans (which are perfectly nutritious). Meals
    > > can be made for 30 cents. If you get past 50 cents, you're being a
    > > luxury hog.
    > >
    > > Of course, you have to do the work yourself.

    >
    > Also the shoplifting--to get healthy meals for under 50 cents.
    >
    > GWC



    COMMENT

    George, bread is 5 cents a slice and generic multivits are 5 cents
    each. Eggs can be had for 10 cents each. If you shop at COSTCO and know
    what you're doing, you can survive indefinitely on $1.50 a day, even
    without resorting to canned catfood (which is perfectly nutritious but
    embarrassing).

    I suggest a homework project for you. Come down from the irory tower.

    SBH
     
  5. "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > George Cherry wrote:
    >
    >> > Go actually price bread, canned meat, eggs, and #10 tin cans of canned
    >> > fruit and vegetables and beans (which are perfectly nutritious). Meals
    >> > can be made for 30 cents. If you get past 50 cents, you're being a
    >> > luxury hog.
    >> >
    >> > Of course, you have to do the work yourself.

    >>
    >> Also the shoplifting--to get healthy meals for under 50 cents.
    >>
    >> GWC

    >
    >
    > COMMENT
    >
    > George, bread is 5 cents a slice and generic multivits are 5 cents
    > each. Eggs can be had for 10 cents each. If you shop at COSTCO and know
    > what you're doing, you can survive indefinitely on $1.50 a day, even
    > without resorting to canned catfood (which is perfectly nutritious but
    > embarrassing).
    >
    > I suggest a homework project for you. Come down from the irory tower.


    Okay, I'll figure out what I actually spend per meal,
    but it's going to add up to a lot more than $0.50
    per meal. Let's take the bread I eat (bread made
    from organic whole sprouted grains and zero
    fat). I estimate each slice (I don't have a loaf in front
    of me) is about $0.20. I put raw organic almond
    butter on it and pop a couple of fish oil capsules.
    Hey, I've just started. Organic red beans with organic
    spaghetti sauce (no salt). And then the fruit--an orange,
    some blueberries, and an organic apple. And then
    a little dairy--low-fat organic yogurt with a tablespoon
    of psyillium hush powder stirred in. And then the
    veggies: broccoli usually. And then a little dessert:
    unsweetened organic apple sauce with a little
    organic unsweetened cocoa. I must be way over a
    buck by now. And then a glass of organic red wine
    without sulphites.

    GWC
     
  6. George Cherry wrote:
    > "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > >
    > > George Cherry wrote:
    > >
    > >> > Go actually price bread, canned meat, eggs, and #10 tin cans of canned
    > >> > fruit and vegetables and beans (which are perfectly nutritious). Meals
    > >> > can be made for 30 cents. If you get past 50 cents, you're being a
    > >> > luxury hog.
    > >> >
    > >> > Of course, you have to do the work yourself.
    > >>
    > >> Also the shoplifting--to get healthy meals for under 50 cents.
    > >>
    > >> GWC

    > >
    > >
    > > COMMENT
    > >
    > > George, bread is 5 cents a slice and generic multivits are 5 cents
    > > each. Eggs can be had for 10 cents each. If you shop at COSTCO and know
    > > what you're doing, you can survive indefinitely on $1.50 a day, even
    > > without resorting to canned catfood (which is perfectly nutritious but
    > > embarrassing).
    > >
    > > I suggest a homework project for you. Come down from the irory tower.

    >
    > Okay, I'll figure out what I actually spend per meal,
    > but it's going to add up to a lot more than $0.50
    > per meal. Let's take the bread I eat (bread made
    > from organic whole sprouted grains and zero
    > fat). I estimate each slice (I don't have a loaf in front
    > of me) is about $0.20. I put raw organic almond
    > butter on it and pop a couple of fish oil capsules.
    > Hey, I've just started.




    COMMENT:

    Well, Jesus, George, it's going to be even more if you include the
    Beluga caviar on the toast points.

    One hopes the point was not that a person has to shoplift in order to
    continue the spouted ground bread raw organic almond lifestyle to which
    they've become accustomed. The point is you can stay alive on 50 cents
    a meal without becoming malnourished. Whether or not your maximum life
    span will be affected is something I can't tell. Probably, if you can't
    afford the molecularly distilled fishoil, wild blueberry juice,
    nanoemulsified CoQ10 and the particular hand-dug Cordyceps sinensis
    smuggled out of a particular Buddhist monestary in mountains of Tibet.

    SBH
     
  7. st7

    st7 Guest

    Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com wrote:

    > Go actually price bread, canned meat, eggs, and #10 tin cans of canned
    > fruit and vegetables and beans (which are perfectly nutritious). Meals
    > can be made for 30 cents. If you get past 50 cents, you're being a
    > luxury hog.
    >
    > Of course, you have to do the work yourself.
    >
    > SBH


    cost unit kcal
    sweet potato 0.59 1 lb 408.6
    egg 0.10 1 med 92
    milk. 1% 0.19 1 c 102
    cabbage 0.20 3 c 52.8
    flax seed 0.02 1 T 59
    banana 0.08 1 med 105
    oatmeal 0.10 4 oz dry 440
    tuna 0.13 1/4 can 50
    onion 0.14 4 oz 50
    lentils 0.15 4 oz dry 384
    generic multi 0.10 1 10
    gen. fish oil 0.20 1 10
    $1.98 1763.4

    Add some extra virgin olive oil or avocado: add $0.20-$0.50
    Add a tomato: another $0.30-$0.50
    Add some lettuce: another $0.30-$0.50
    Add some seasonal fruit: another $0.50-$1.00

    This does not consider cooking or condiment costs.

    I see this as at least $4 per day to make it palatable,
    and to add a cup of coffee in the morning.
     
  8. "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > George Cherry wrote:
    >> "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > George Cherry wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> > Go actually price bread, canned meat, eggs, and #10 tin cans of
    >> >> > canned
    >> >> > fruit and vegetables and beans (which are perfectly nutritious).
    >> >> > Meals
    >> >> > can be made for 30 cents. If you get past 50 cents, you're being a
    >> >> > luxury hog.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Of course, you have to do the work yourself.
    >> >>
    >> >> Also the shoplifting--to get healthy meals for under 50 cents.
    >> >>
    >> >> GWC
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > COMMENT
    >> >
    >> > George, bread is 5 cents a slice and generic multivits are 5 cents
    >> > each. Eggs can be had for 10 cents each. If you shop at COSTCO and know
    >> > what you're doing, you can survive indefinitely on $1.50 a day, even
    >> > without resorting to canned catfood (which is perfectly nutritious but
    >> > embarrassing).
    >> >
    >> > I suggest a homework project for you. Come down from the irory tower.

    >>
    >> Okay, I'll figure out what I actually spend per meal,
    >> but it's going to add up to a lot more than $0.50
    >> per meal. Let's take the bread I eat (bread made
    >> from organic whole sprouted grains and zero
    >> fat). I estimate each slice (I don't have a loaf in front
    >> of me) is about $0.20. I put raw organic almond
    >> butter on it and pop a couple of fish oil capsules.
    >> Hey, I've just started.

    >
    >
    >
    > COMMENT:
    >
    > Well, Jesus, George, it's going to be even more if you include the
    > Beluga caviar on the toast points.
    >
    > One hopes the point was not that a person has to shoplift in order to
    > continue the spouted ground bread raw organic almond lifestyle to which
    > they've become accustomed. The point is you can stay alive on 50 cents
    > a meal without becoming malnourished. Whether or not your maximum life
    > span will be affected is something I can't tell. Probably, if you can't
    > afford the molecularly distilled fishoil, wild blueberry juice,
    > nanoemulsified CoQ10 and the particular hand-dug Cordyceps sinensis
    > smuggled out of a particular Buddhist monestary in mountains of Tibet.


    When we shopped today I tried to figure out what I would
    buy for my next meal if I had only $0.50 to spend. I jumped
    on a 15.5oz. (438g) can of Goya "Small Red Beans".
    (These are the cheapest beans they sell at the Hannaford's
    Super Market in York, Maine, where we usually shop.)
    The can of beans was $0.49, so I was just under the $0.50
    limit you set for me.

    I chose small red beans because I like their taste, the 15.5oz
    can would give me 24.5 grams of protein, about 85% of my
    daily value of fiber, about 1/3 of my daily value of iron,
    about 14% of my daily requirement of calcium, and a nice
    slug of anti-oxidants (Small Red Beans are a very rich source
    and anti-oxidants.) The whole can would give me only 315
    calories. That's more Calorie Restriction (less than 1000
    calories per day) than even this CRON practitioner wants
    to practice. Furthermore, I don't think I'd hit the ON part of
    CRON (Optimum Nutrition).

    Of course, I could buy a #10 can of dried Small Red Beans,
    soak 'em, and simmer 'em for 2.5 to 3.0 hours. But that's
    a lot of trouble and a lot of propane.

    But I'd have $0.03 left if I ate a can of Goya beans for every
    meal. Maybe I could buy a few loose grapes in the produce
    department and get a little Resveratrol. And maybe I could
    collect my expelled gas and try to use it instead of propane.

    Well, I think I'll just continue to be a super "luxury hog".
    But I think someone impecunious should check out
    Small Red Beans. I think they might give the most
    nutrition bang for the buck.

    GWC
     
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