Re: USS v OSS - which is best going up ?

  • Thread starter Just zis Guy, you know?
  • Start date



J

Just zis Guy, you know?

Guest
On 19 Apr 2005 04:48:56 -0700, "Sebastian Weetabix"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>I'm trying to decide between USS and OSS for my first recumbent. I
>intend using the bike for relaxed touring in hilly terrain, so climbing
>ability is more important than aerodynamics. I am guessing that USS
>would be best - it seems a stronger position in which to brace yourself
>against the seat while pushing hard on the pedals. Any thoughts ?


If you try bracing yourself on the steering while powering up hill you
will do this: fall off. I have above-seat steering, it is
theoretically possible to grab the bars and pull, but it's a mistake
you only make once.

For hilly terrain you simply put the seat slightly more upright and
let physics do the rest.

>Another thing - assuming you have the right gears, what's the steepest
>gradient you can reasonably expect to cycle up ? My favourite hill
>climb is the Hardknott Pass - anyone been over this on a bent ?


Not Hardknott, no. I find that much less than 6mph starts to get a
bit unstable on the Stinger. A bike with a higher CoG like a
StreetMachine will be better.

Guy
--
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at CHS, Puget Sound
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
Peter Clinch wrote:

> I can get down to about walking pace okay on the SMGT. The Fiero (not
> dissimilar to the Stinger, only much cooler ;-)) does seem to wibble a
> bit more on the big drags


I'm OK down to about 4.5 km/h on the Speedmachine. On one occasion with the
Kingcycle, however, I was Proceeding up a fairly steep bit of Denmark with
the Avocet 30's display firmly lodged on zero.

While overtaking Christine Murphy's similar machine.

--
Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
Jack Hackett for Pope!
 
L

LSMike

Guest
"Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> But your seat is more upright to start with. Mine is typically below
> the 30 degree mark.
>


As is mine, as far down as the seat and the suspension can go. I don't seem
to feel much difference climbing little London hills regardless of how
upright my seat is. I much prefer the low position anyway.
 
J

Just zis Guy, you know?

Guest
On Tue, 19 Apr 2005 18:07:09 +0000 (UTC), "LSMike"
<[email protected]> wrote in message
<[email protected]>:

>> But your seat is more upright to start with. Mine is typically below
>> the 30 degree mark.


>As is mine, as far down as the seat and the suspension can go. I don't seem
>to feel much difference climbing little London hills regardless of how
>upright my seat is.


But I find single chevron hills a bit challenging at 25 degrees, much
easier at 28 or 30.


Guy
--
http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

"To every complex problem there is a solution which is
simple, neat and wrong" - HL Mencken