Re: Way OT (credit fraud countermeasures)

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Kyle Phillips, Feb 27, 2005.

  1. "Dog3" <[email protected];ajklsd;ajlds.nutz> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    > Okay, I found out late last night someone is usin my social security
    > number. Supposedly I own a car in Nebraska that was involved in a car
    > accident, a bad one. I have called the local authorities,not much luck
    > there. Gawd, I've never been to Nebraska.
    >


    Ouch. I'm sorry this happened. The below is from an old issue of Cosa Bolle
    in Pentola, my (nominally) Italian wine food and travel newsletter:
    ___
    A Public Service Announcement
    Moving in a very different direction, this summer a friend of mine
    discovered that she was the victim of identity theft when a major retailer's
    collection agency called her to ask when she intended to start paying her
    bill. It turns out someone got her address and social security number,
    perhaps by snooping through her file at work, and armed with these numbers
    set up the account at the retailer. Nobody asked to see the person who did
    the calling at any step in the procedure -- she gave an address in some
    other part of town -- and when I last talked with my friend she said the
    criminal was still at large and she was still had financial worries stemming
    from the mess.

    So I have decided to pass on the following email, even though it has nothing
    to do with Italian foods or wines, in the hopes that it will save someone
    some grief:

    Subject: IDENTITY PROTECTION
    A corporate attorney sent the following out to the employees in his company.
    I pass it along, for your information.

    The next time you order checks have only your initials (instead of first
    name) and last name put on them. If someone takes your checkbook they will
    not know if you sign your checks with just your initials or your first name
    but your bank will know how you sign your checks.

    Put your work phone # on your checks instead of your home phone. If you have
    a PO Box use that instead of your home address. If you do not have a PO Box
    use your work address. Never have your SS# printed on your checks -- you can
    add it if it is necessary. But if you have it printed, anyone can get it.

    Place the contents of your wallet on a photocopy machine, do both sides of
    each license, credit card, etc. You will know what you had in your wallet
    and all of the account numbers and phone numbers to call and cancel. Keep
    the photocopy in a safe place. I also carry a photocopy of my passport when
    I travel either here or abroad.

    We've all heard horror stories about fraud that's committed on us in
    stealing a name, address, Social Security number, credit cards, etc.
    Unfortunately I, an attorney, have firsthand knowledge because my wallet was
    stolen last month. Within a week, the thieve(s) ordered an expensive monthly
    cell phone package, applied for a VISA credit card, had a credit line
    approved to buy a Gateway computer, received a PIN number from DMV to change
    my driving record information online, and more.

    But here's some critical information to limit the damage in case this
    happens to you or someone you know:

    We have been told we should cancel our credit cards immediately. But the key
    is having the toll free numbers and your card numbers handy so you know whom
    to call.
    Keep those where you can find them easily.

    File a police report immediately in the jurisdiction where it was stolen,
    this proves to credit providers you were diligent, and is a first step
    toward an investigation (if there ever is one).

    But here's what is perhaps most important: (I never even thought to do
    this) Call the three national credit reporting organizations immediately to
    place a fraud alert on your name and Social Security number. I had never
    heard of doing that until advised by a bank that called to tell me an
    application for credit was made over the Internet in my name. The alert
    means any company that checks your credit knows your information was stolen
    and they have to contact you by phone to authorize new credit.

    By the time I was advised to do this, almost two weeks after the theft, all
    the damage had been done. There are records of all the credit checks
    initiated by the thieves' purchases, none of which I knew about before
    placing the alert. Since then, no additional damage has been done, and the
    thieves threw my wallet away this weekend (someone turned it in). It seems
    to have stopped them in their tracks.

    The numbers are:
    Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
    Experian (formerly TRW): 1-888-397-3742
    Trans Union: 1-800-680-7289
    Social Security Administration (fraud line): 1-800-269-0271

    ___

    Kyle
    http://www.cosablle.com
     
    Tags:


  2. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Kyle Phillips" <[email protected]>

    > The numbers are:
    > Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
    > Experian (formerly TRW): 1-888-397-3742
    > Trans Union: 1-800-680-7289
    > Social Security Administration (fraud line): 1-800-269-0271


    GOOD JOB!!! I wanted to post this information but I didn't know
    where to look for it. Thanks for your post, great information.

    nancy
     
  3. The Cook

    The Cook Guest

    "Kyle Phillips" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Dog3" <[email protected];ajklsd;ajlds.nutz> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >news:[email protected]
    >> Okay, I found out late last night someone is usin my social security
    >> number. Supposedly I own a car in Nebraska that was involved in a car
    >> accident, a bad one. I have called the local authorities,not much luck
    >> there. Gawd, I've never been to Nebraska.
    >>

    >
    >Ouch. I'm sorry this happened. The below is from an old issue of Cosa Bolle
    >in Pentola, my (nominally) Italian wine food and travel newsletter:
    >___
    >A Public Service Announcement
    >Moving in a very different direction, this summer a friend of mine
    >discovered that she was the victim of identity theft when a major retailer's
    >collection agency called her to ask when she intended to start paying her
    >bill. It turns out someone got her address and social security number,
    >perhaps by snooping through her file at work, and armed with these numbers
    >set up the account at the retailer. Nobody asked to see the person who did
    >the calling at any step in the procedure -- she gave an address in some
    >other part of town -- and when I last talked with my friend she said the
    >criminal was still at large and she was still had financial worries stemming
    >from the mess.
    >
    >So I have decided to pass on the following email, even though it has nothing
    >to do with Italian foods or wines, in the hopes that it will save someone
    >some grief:
    >
    >Subject: IDENTITY PROTECTION
    >A corporate attorney sent the following out to the employees in his company.
    >I pass it along, for your information.
    >
    >The next time you order checks have only your initials (instead of first
    >name) and last name put on them. If someone takes your checkbook they will
    >not know if you sign your checks with just your initials or your first name
    >but your bank will know how you sign your checks.
    >
    >Put your work phone # on your checks instead of your home phone. If you have
    >a PO Box use that instead of your home address. If you do not have a PO Box
    >use your work address. Never have your SS# printed on your checks -- you can
    >add it if it is necessary. But if you have it printed, anyone can get it.
    >
    >Place the contents of your wallet on a photocopy machine, do both sides of
    >each license, credit card, etc. You will know what you had in your wallet
    >and all of the account numbers and phone numbers to call and cancel. Keep
    >the photocopy in a safe place. I also carry a photocopy of my passport when
    >I travel either here or abroad.
    >
    >We've all heard horror stories about fraud that's committed on us in
    >stealing a name, address, Social Security number, credit cards, etc.
    >Unfortunately I, an attorney, have firsthand knowledge because my wallet was
    >stolen last month. Within a week, the thieve(s) ordered an expensive monthly
    >cell phone package, applied for a VISA credit card, had a credit line
    >approved to buy a Gateway computer, received a PIN number from DMV to change
    >my driving record information online, and more.
    >
    >But here's some critical information to limit the damage in case this
    >happens to you or someone you know:
    >
    >We have been told we should cancel our credit cards immediately. But the key
    >is having the toll free numbers and your card numbers handy so you know whom
    >to call.
    >Keep those where you can find them easily.
    >
    >File a police report immediately in the jurisdiction where it was stolen,
    >this proves to credit providers you were diligent, and is a first step
    >toward an investigation (if there ever is one).
    >
    >But here's what is perhaps most important: (I never even thought to do
    >this) Call the three national credit reporting organizations immediately to
    >place a fraud alert on your name and Social Security number. I had never
    >heard of doing that until advised by a bank that called to tell me an
    >application for credit was made over the Internet in my name. The alert
    >means any company that checks your credit knows your information was stolen
    >and they have to contact you by phone to authorize new credit.
    >
    >By the time I was advised to do this, almost two weeks after the theft, all
    >the damage had been done. There are records of all the credit checks
    >initiated by the thieves' purchases, none of which I knew about before
    >placing the alert. Since then, no additional damage has been done, and the
    >thieves threw my wallet away this weekend (someone turned it in). It seems
    >to have stopped them in their tracks.
    >
    >The numbers are:
    >Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
    >Experian (formerly TRW): 1-888-397-3742
    >Trans Union: 1-800-680-7289
    >Social Security Administration (fraud line): 1-800-269-0271
    >
    >___
    >
    >Kyle
    >http://www.cosablle.com
    >


    Kyle, thank you so much for all the information. I just printed it
    out to put with my important papers.


    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral, 48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)
     
  4. limey

    limey Guest

    "Kyle Phillips" wrote >

    > "Dog3" wrote>> Okay, I found out late last night someone is usin my social
    > security
    >> number. Supposedly I own a car in Nebraska that was involved in a car
    >> accident, a bad one. I have called the local authorities,not much luck
    >> there. Gawd, I've never been to Nebraska.
    >>

    >
    > Ouch. I'm sorry this happened. The below is from an old issue of Cosa
    > Bolle
    > in Pentola, my (nominally) Italian wine food and travel newsletter:


    (great information clipped and saved)

    > Kyle
    > http://www.cosablle.com


    When shopping and handing over my credit card and signing the charge slip, I
    often ask the clerk, "Did you check the signatures, to see if they match?"
    I'm always greeted with the same puzzled look. Scary. Try it sometime.

    Dora
     
  5. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest


    > When shopping and handing over my credit card and signing the charge slip,
    > I
    > often ask the clerk, "Did you check the signatures, to see if they match?"
    > I'm always greeted with the same puzzled look. Scary. Try it sometime.


    Once I was buying something and I hadn't signed my card. The cashier
    pointed that out and insisted I sign it. (sigh) She then checked my
    signature
    against the charge slip and yup, the signatures matched. I wanted to pluck
    her in the head, maybe jump start her brain cells. (laugh)

    One time, I was in a yarn shop, I was paying for my stuff, the cashier
    whipped out that booklet they have, card numbers that are invalid for
    whatever reason ... she went pale. Started looking around for her
    cohorts in the store for backup, I guess. Finally she spit it out ...
    the number's not in here! Hell, it better not be!!! I guess she was
    out the day they explained the concept behind the booklet.

    nancy
     
  6. Scott

    Scott Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "limey" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > When shopping and handing over my credit card and signing the charge slip, I
    > often ask the clerk, "Did you check the signatures, to see if they match?"
    > I'm always greeted with the same puzzled look. Scary. Try it sometime.


    I've seen them check the signatures in many places, but the thought that
    keeps occurring to me is, do they even know what they're looking for? My
    signature on my card was done more carefully than the rush-job I do on
    receipts in the store, but no one's ever said anything. And would the
    cashier have the nerve to say something if they thought it didn't match?


    Here's one for the idiot file:
    A friend of mine used to own a hardware store. I was there one day,
    chatting with him, when a woman in her mid-thirties came in, wearing a
    cap with the logo of a local county police department.

    She paid for her purchase with a credit card. My friend checked the
    signatures, and said to her, "the credit card doesn't have a signature
    on it. I'll have to see some ID."

    With a little triumphant smile, the woman said, "See? That's a police
    trick. Don't sign your credit cards. If someone steals 'em, they'll have
    to show ID before they can use 'em."

    Me: "Well, no. They'll just sign the back of the credit cards. That way,
    the signatures will match and they won't be caught."

    She: "They can't do that!"

    Me: "Of course they can. They have your credit card in their hands. They
    can do whatever they want to it."

    The look on her face was comical.

    --
    to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

    <http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/>
     
  7. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 14:43:29 GMT, "Kyle Phillips"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > The numbers are:
    > Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
    > Experian (formerly TRW): 1-888-397-3742
    > Trans Union: 1-800-680-7289
    > Social Security Administration (fraud line): 1-800-269-0271



    Thanks for the information! Sorry you had to find out the
    hard way, though.

    sf
     
  8. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sun, 27 Feb 2005 10:45:19 -0500, "limey"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > When shopping and handing over my credit card and signing the charge slip, I
    > often ask the clerk, "Did you check the signatures, to see if they match?"
    > I'm always greeted with the same puzzled look. Scary. Try it sometime.


    I'm finding that more and more diligent clerks also ask for
    picture ID, such as a driver's license.

    sf
     
  9. limey

    limey Guest

    "sf" wrote in message

    "limey"
    > wrote:
    > When shopping and handing over my credit card and signing the charge
    > slip, I
    >> often ask the clerk, "Did you check the signatures, to see if they
    >> match?"
    >> I'm always greeted with the same puzzled look. Scary. Try it
    >> sometime.

    >
    > I'm finding that more and more diligent clerks also ask for
    > picture ID, such as a driver's license.
    >
    > sf


    Yes, I think everyone is more conscious of security these days. Why, I even
    had to produce a picture ID before I could get my mammogram taken! Now
    who'd want to fake that?
    <BG>

    Dora
     
  10. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "limey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > Yes, I think everyone is more conscious of security these days. Why, I
    > even had to produce a picture ID before I could get my mammogram taken!
    > Now who'd want to fake that?


    What, you needed to provide a picture of your boobs? I thought that's what
    they were for! (smile)

    Increasingly, I need to get a picture driver's license. Sucks.

    nancy
     
  11. Nancy Young wrote:

    > "Kyle Phillips" <[email protected]>
    >
    > > The numbers are:
    > > Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
    > > Experian (formerly TRW): 1-888-397-3742
    > > Trans Union: 1-800-680-7289
    > > Social Security Administration (fraud line): 1-800-269-0271

    >
    > GOOD JOB!!! I wanted to post this information but I didn't know
    > where to look for it. Thanks for your post, great information.
    >



    And IIRC as of March 1st (this Tuesday) these agencies are required to give
    you a credit report for no cost...

    --
    Best
    Greg
     
  12. The Cook

    The Cook Guest

    "limey" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Nancy Young" wrote in message >
    >"limey" wrote in message
    >>
    >>> Yes, I think everyone is more conscious of security these days. Why, I
    >>> even had to produce a picture ID before I could get my mammogram taken!
    >>> Now who'd want to fake that?

    >>
    >> What, you needed to provide a picture of your boobs? I thought that's
    >> what
    >> they were for! (smile)

    >
    >(cracking up). I said, "Geez, what do you think I would do? Send a
    >friend?"



    How about an enemy?



    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral, 48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)
     
  13. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    Rusty wrote:

    > On your credit card, where the signature goes, just write, "ASK FOR
    > I.D.".
    > Rusty


    Perhaps better yet- "ask for PICTURE ID"
    Goomba
     
  14. "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Kyle Phillips" <[email protected]>
    >
    > > The numbers are:
    > > Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
    > > Experian (formerly TRW): 1-888-397-3742
    > > Trans Union: 1-800-680-7289
    > > Social Security Administration (fraud line): 1-800-269-0271

    >
    > GOOD JOB!!! I wanted to post this information but I didn't know
    > where to look for it. Thanks for your post, great information.
    >
    > nancy
    >

    I forgot to mention that the thing is a year old. I assume that the numbers
    are still valid, but if they're not they'll at least point people in the
    right direction. The important thing is to have the organizations' names

    Kyle
     
  15. Default User

    Default User Guest

    Gregory Morrow wrote:
    > Nancy Young wrote:
    >
    > > "Kyle Phillips" <[email protected]>
    > >
    > > > The numbers are:
    > > > Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
    > > > Experian (formerly TRW): 1-888-397-3742
    > > > Trans Union: 1-800-680-7289
    > > > Social Security Administration (fraud line): 1-800-269-0271

    > >
    > > GOOD JOB!!! I wanted to post this information but I didn't know
    > > where to look for it. Thanks for your post, great information.
    > >

    >
    >
    > And IIRC as of March 1st (this Tuesday) these agencies are required

    to give
    > you a credit report for no cost...



    They are rolling out the free reports in phases by region of the
    country. West coast got theirs starting Jan. 1. The midwest has them
    available starting Mar. 1. That's good for Dog3, as he is a St. Louis
    guy and can get them (and REALLY needs them).


    Brian
     
  16. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Default User wrote:
    > Gregory Morrow wrote:
    >> Nancy Young wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Kyle Phillips" <[email protected]>
    >>>
    >>>> The numbers are:
    >>>> Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
    >>>> Experian (formerly TRW): 1-888-397-3742
    >>>> Trans Union: 1-800-680-7289
    >>>> Social Security Administration (fraud line): 1-800-269-0271
    >>>
    >>> GOOD JOB!!! I wanted to post this information but I didn't know
    >>> where to look for it. Thanks for your post, great information.
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> And IIRC as of March 1st (this Tuesday) these agencies are required
    >> to give you a credit report for no cost...

    >
    >
    > They are rolling out the free reports in phases by region of the
    > country. West coast got theirs starting Jan. 1. The midwest has them
    > available starting Mar. 1. That's good for Dog3, as he is a St. Louis
    > guy and can get them (and REALLY needs them).
    >
    >
    > Brian


    I had some goofy stuff show up on my credit report. I had to pay for the
    report, too. It listed me as having worked for someone I never worked for;
    had my work address as my home address (who at home has a 'suite' number?);
    had me owing money for trash pickup when I lived in apartments where it's
    included in the rent. Then of course MCI 'slammed' me for long distance
    charges when I never used them for anything, let alone long distance. They
    would only take 3 months of charges off my bill because I didn't notice it
    sooner - it was only a buck or so a month so I didn't notice it right away.
    (sigh)

    Jill
     
  17. "limey" <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >When shopping and handing over my credit card and signing the charge slip, I
    >often ask the clerk, "Did you check the signatures, to see if they match?"
    >I'm always greeted with the same puzzled look. Scary. Try it sometime.


    I haven't done that, but I always thank the clerks who do check.

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  18. "Kyle Phillips" <[email protected]>, if that's his real name,
    wrote:

    >A Public Service Announcement


    Thanks for this information, Kyle. And it's so cool that you're posting
    again. You were missed.

    I think it's about time I made your lasagna with bechamel (thanks for
    telling me what bechamel was), prosciutto and yummy red sauce. I wonder if
    the deli is still open.

    Carol


    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  19. "Nancy Young" <[email protected]>, if that's their real name, wrote:

    >Once I was buying something and I hadn't signed my card. The cashier
    >pointed that out and insisted I sign it. (sigh) She then checked my
    >signature against the charge slip and yup, the signatures matched.
    >I wanted to pluck her in the head, maybe jump start her brain cells. (laugh)


    That is TOO funny!

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
  20. Rusty <[email protected]_spam_y_a_h_o_o_.com>, if that's their real name,
    wrote:

    >On your credit card, where the signature goes, just write, "ASK FOR
    >I.D.".


    I did that. A clerk made me sign the card anyway. People don't make it
    easy to protect yourself.

    Carol
    --
    "Years ago my mother used to say to me... She'd say,
    'In this world Elwood, you must be oh-so smart or oh-so pleasant.'
    Well, for years I was smart.... I recommend pleasant. You may quote me."

    *James Stewart* in the 1950 movie, _Harvey_
     
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