Re: What are the most important things when buying a bike?



T

Tumbleweed

Guest
"Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Tumbleweed wrote:
>>
>> Werent they all employed in soem respect by their
>> universities.professors, teaching assistants etc?
>>

>
> And where does University funding come from?


Some from the tax paper, some from patronage, some from industry. All a
fixed amount rather than an open ended sum available to anyone who'd like to
study indefinitely.

>
>
>>
>> I take your point, but that doens't imply that therefore anyone should be
>> able to study whatever they want for as long as they want..which is the
>> implication of the complaint that people who choose to do post grad
>> studies should be funded by someone else (generally aka the rest of us).
>>

>
> Who do you think actually does most of the research?


'the* research???'...you'll have to narrow it down a bit more than
that.....research into media studies..surfing....david beckham...quantum
mechanics..film criticism....DNA...genetics...????


>
>
>>>
>>>As for baroque music being irrelevant as a subject to study, I bet more
>>>westerners would be familiar with the works of Bach, Vivaldi and Handel

>>
>>
>> None of whom got grants or even student loans.
>>

>
> But lived instead on patronage - the then equivalent of today's Arts
> Council grant - and what they could earn from part time jobs and selling
> compositions - the then equivalent of a part time evening job.
>
>
> Tony


Well then perhaps todays post grads can do that instead of whinging about
not being supported by those on uk.rec.cycling (trying to get back on topic)
who pay taxes.


--
Tumbleweed

email replies not necessary but to contact use;
tumbleweednews at hotmail dot com
 
C

Chris Malcolm

Guest
"Tumbleweed" <[email protected]> writes:

>"Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>> Tumbleweed wrote:


>>> Werent they all employed in soem respect by their
>>> universities.professors, teaching assistants etc?


>> And where does University funding come from?


>Some from the tax paper, some from patronage, some from industry. All a
>fixed amount rather than an open ended sum available to anyone who'd like to
>study indefinitely.


You don't get accepted to do a postgrad degree just because you want
to. There are necessary qualifications, which ensures that only a few
unusually clever and well educated folk are allowed in. And you don't
get to study indefinitely. If you muck about you get thrown out. If
you try hard but can't make the grade you get thrown out. And if you
do make reasonable progress, but slowly, after a certain reasonable
amount of time you're thrown on your own resources. After a certain
further time, you're thrown out.
--
Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
[http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
 
A

Arthur Clune

Guest
Chris Malcolm <[email protected]> wrote:

: You don't get accepted to do a postgrad degree just because you want
: to.

Really? That may still be true for a PhD course, but it's definatly no
longer true for a MSc. Pay the money and you get let on the course. And
once you've paid, you'll have to really, really, really try to fail.

Arthur

--
Arthur Clune PGP/GPG Key: http://www.clune.org/pubkey.txt
It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness
 
C

Chris Malcolm

Guest
"Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> writes:

>Chris Malcolm <[email protected]> wrote:


>: You don't get accepted to do a postgrad degree just because you want
>: to.


>Really? That may still be true for a PhD course, but it's definatly no
>longer true for a MSc. Pay the money and you get let on the course. And
>once you've paid, you'll have to really, really, really try to fail.


They may well do that in some of these rubbish modern "universities"
the Govt created as a prelude to stuffing half the population through
"university".
--
Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
[http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
 
B

Brian G

Guest
Arthur Clune wrote:
> Chris Malcolm <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> : You don't get accepted to do a postgrad degree just because you want
> : to.
>
> Really? That may still be true for a PhD course, but it's definatly no
> longer true for a MSc. Pay the money and you get let on the course. And
> once you've paid, you'll have to really, really, really try to fail.
>
> Arthur
>

You're saying that British universities are now offering Masters degrees
for sale, a practice hitherto thought to be confined to Certain Other
Countries. Is there an age limit for purchasers? I never did get
around to doing a Masters when young. :)

--
Brian G
 
N

[Not Responding]

Guest
On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 14:53:36 +0000, Brian G <[email protected]>
wrote:

>Arthur Clune wrote:
>> Chris Malcolm <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>> : You don't get accepted to do a postgrad degree just because you want
>> : to.
>>
>> Really? That may still be true for a PhD course, but it's definatly no
>> longer true for a MSc. Pay the money and you get let on the course. And
>> once you've paid, you'll have to really, really, really try to fail.
>>
>> Arthur
>>

>You're saying that British universities are now offering Masters degrees
>for sale, a practice hitherto thought to be confined to Certain Other
>Countries. Is there an age limit for purchasers? I never did get
>around to doing a Masters when young. :)


It's more the case that if you keep writing the cheques (couple of
grand a year?), they won't throw you off. Still have to do the work to
get the degree, though.
 
T

Tumbleweed

Guest
" [Not Responding] " <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 14:53:36 +0000, Brian G <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>
>>Arthur Clune wrote:
>>> Chris Malcolm <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>
>>> : You don't get accepted to do a postgrad degree just because you want
>>> : to.
>>>
>>> Really? That may still be true for a PhD course, but it's definatly no
>>> longer true for a MSc. Pay the money and you get let on the course. And
>>> once you've paid, you'll have to really, really, really try to fail.
>>>
>>> Arthur
>>>

>>You're saying that British universities are now offering Masters degrees
>>for sale, a practice hitherto thought to be confined to Certain Other
>>Countries. Is there an age limit for purchasers? I never did get
>>around to doing a Masters when young. :)

>
> It's more the case that if you keep writing the cheques (couple of
> grand a year?), they won't throw you off. Still have to do the work to
> get the degree, though.


Except at Cambridge IIRC? Do they still do that? A friend of mine got an MA
there just for turning up a year later after his BSc and paying a few quid.
This was <fx>cough</fx> several years ago though.

--
Tumbleweed

email replies not necessary but to contact use;
tumbleweednews at hotmail dot com
 
C

Colin Blackburn

Guest
Tumbleweed wrote:
> " [Not Responding] " <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>>It's more the case that if you keep writing the cheques (couple of
>>grand a year?), they won't throw you off. Still have to do the work to
>>get the degree, though.

>
>
> Except at Cambridge IIRC? Do they still do that? A friend of mine got an MA
> there just for turning up a year later after his BSc and paying a few quid.
> This was <fx>cough</fx> several years ago though.


This is historical. The MA is what your friend went there to get. They
gave him a BSc after 3 or 4 years to give him a bit of paper that
employers would understand, as that's the bit of paper the other English
universities hand out, until he qualified for his MA after seven years.
It is the other English universities that are "different", for what it
matters.

Colin
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
Tumbleweed wrote:

> Except at Cambridge IIRC? Do they still do that? A friend of mine got
> an MA there just for turning up a year later after his BSc and paying
> a few quid. This was <fx>cough</fx> several years ago though.


And Oxford, or at least it was the case when Dr Larrington went from BA to
MA.

--

Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
World Domination?
Just find a world that's into that kind of thing, then chain to the
floor and walk up and down on it in high heels. (Mr. Sunshine)
 
A

Arthur Clune

Guest
Chris Malcolm <[email protected]> wrote:

: They may well do that in some of these rubbish modern "universities"
: the Govt created as a prelude to stuffing half the population through
: "university".

Really? Do you think it's just the modern ones? Look at my posting address

Arthur (yeah, I now, it's not that modern....)

--
Arthur Clune PGP/GPG Key: http://www.clune.org/pubkey.txt
It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness
 
A

Arthur Clune

Guest
Brian G <[email protected]> wrote:

: You're saying that British universities are now offering Masters degrees
: for sale

No. Nothing that blatent. I'm saying that if you pay, and turn up and hand
in something bearing a vague relation to what you are ment to hand in,
even if that isn't very good, then you'll pass.


--
Arthur Clune PGP/GPG Key: http://www.clune.org/pubkey.txt
It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness
 
N

Nick Kew

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Tumbleweed" <[email protected]> writes:

> Except at Cambridge IIRC? Do they still do that? A friend of mine got an MA
> there just for turning up a year later after his BSc and paying a few quid.


Bzzt. No such thing as a BSc at Cambridge. Those new-fangled things
are an innovation of newer universities.

And why did he want to *pay* for his MA? Didn't he earn it?

--
Nick Kew
 
N

Nick Kew

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> writes:

> Arthur (yeah, I now, it's not that modern....)


1960s-vintage, innit? The penultimate big wave of expansion gave us
some unis with rather strong reputations - like Warwick, for instance.

I have some vague recollection of putting York on my UCCA form and
visiting it[1] as a sixth-former. Looked OK - I think I might even
have gone there if Cambridge had turned me down.

[1] They were careful not to call it an interview - they really
couldn't afford to risk intimidating or insulting candidates
with the notion of having to achieve something even then.

--
Nick Kew
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
Tumbleweed wrote:
>
> Except at Cambridge IIRC? Do they still do that? A friend of mine got an MA
> there just for turning up a year later after his BSc and paying a few quid.
> This was <fx>cough</fx> several years ago though.
>


Cambridge and Oxford tradition I believe - plus you have to stay out of
jail to qualify. OTOH most employers know that so discount its value.

Tony
 
T

Tumbleweed

Guest
"Nick Kew" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> In article <[email protected]>,
> "Tumbleweed" <[email protected]> writes:
>
>> Except at Cambridge IIRC? Do they still do that? A friend of mine got an
>> MA
>> there just for turning up a year later after his BSc and paying a few
>> quid.

>


Well it was umpty years ago , maybe it wasa BA then. Materials Science or
some such IIRC.

> Bzzt. No such thing as a BSc at Cambridge. Those new-fangled things
> are an innovation of newer universities.
>
> And why did he want to *pay* for his MA? Didn't he earn it?
>
> --
> Nick Kew


Again IIRC he had to pay some trivial sum of money and then he got it. Maybe
he didnt even have to pay any money.

--
Tumbleweed

email replies not necessary but to contact use;
tumbleweednews at hotmail dot com
 
A

Alan Braggins

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Tumbleweed wrote:
>> grand a year?), they won't throw you off. Still have to do the work to
>> get the degree, though.

>
>Except at Cambridge IIRC? Do they still do that? A friend of mine got an MA
>there just for turning up a year later after his BSc and paying a few quid.


After his BA, Cambridge doesn't hold with these newfangled BSc things.
And you have to have not been convicted of anything serious in the meantime
so someone can assure someone else in Latin that you are of good character
(and it's five years after matriculation, which is generally two years after
graduation). As far as I know it's still the same.
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>, Tumbleweed
('[email protected]') wrote:

>
> " [Not Responding] " <[email protected]> wrote in
> message news:[email protected]
>> On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 14:53:36 +0000, Brian G <[email protected]>
>> wrote:

>
> Except at Cambridge IIRC? Do they still do that? A friend of mine got
> an MA there just for turning up a year later after his BSc and paying
> a few quid. This was <fx>cough</fx> several years ago though.


My father did that, immediately before the war. Mind you, he had just
got a double first.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

;; All in all you're just another hick in the mall
-- Drink C'lloid
 
D

David Martin

Guest
Simon Brooke wrote:
> in message <[email protected]>, Tumbleweed
> ('[email protected]') wrote:
>
>
>>" [Not Responding] " <[email protected]> wrote in
>>message news:[email protected]
>>
>>>On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 14:53:36 +0000, Brian G <[email protected]>
>>>wrote:

>>
>>Except at Cambridge IIRC? Do they still do that? A friend of mine got
>>an MA there just for turning up a year later after his BSc and paying
>>a few quid. This was <fx>cough</fx> several years ago though.

>
>
> My father did that, immediately before the war. Mind you, he had just
> got a double first.
>

Dr Martin (the other one) did that at Oxford. paid her tenner and got
her MA. Then a D phil so she is another MAD Phil..

...d
 
J

James Annan

Guest
Brian G wrote:


> You're saying that British universities are now offering Masters degrees
> for sale, a practice hitherto thought to be confined to Certain Other
> Countries. Is there an age limit for purchasers? I never did get
> around to doing a Masters when young. :)


I believe mine sells them for about a tenner. I've not got round to
buying one yet.

James
--
If I have seen further than others, it is
by treading on the toes of giants.
http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/
 
J

Jon Senior

Guest
Tumbleweed wrote:
> Again IIRC he had to pay some trivial sum of money and then he got it. Maybe
> he didnt even have to pay any money.


The money was to cover "administrative fees".

We had a teacher at school who was ex-Cambridge. He held a BA in
physics. The university contacted him a year (IIRC) after his degree to
offer him the MA. He politely declined, explaining that if he wanted an
MA, he go and do one.

The argument was that an Oxbridge BA was worth an MA from A.N.Other
university. Of course, the fact that they didn't give you the MA from
the start, combined with the peculiar wait (Based on the assumption that
your knowledge in the field will have been steadily increasing since the
end of your degree!) makes it look like a bit like an Old Boy's pat on
the back.

Jon
 

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