Re: Your first cooking experience

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by roxmarie, Jan 12, 2005.

  1. roxmarie

    roxmarie Guest

    Dimitri wrote:
    > Other than cinnamon toast and cold cereal or a sandwich what was the

    first
    > thing you cooked, and about how old were you?
    >
    > I distinctly trying my hand at scrambled eggs Mexican style at about

    11 (
    > after they cooked I needed to drain off the extra liquid from the

    tomatoes I
    > put in).
    >
    > I second attempt was a pineapple upside-down cake in an old cast iron

    pan
    > swerved with whipped cream about 3 yeas later. That one turned out

    very
    > well. ;-)
    >
    > Dimitri


    Clam pasta, 1950s style... This dish brings back soulful memories.

    1 cube butter
    chopped garlic
    1 small can chopped clams
    1/4 cup chopped parsley
    salt and pepper

    Melt butter in a sauce pan. Gently sautee/simmer garlic for 3 or 4
    minutes - don't burn. Add the clams juice. Simmer very gently to
    reduce. Add the clams and parsley, simmer gently until the clams are
    heated through. Season with salt and pepper.
    Serve over boiled spaghetti.
     
    Tags:


  2. On Wed 12 Jan 2005 10:50:26p, roxmarie tittered and giggled, and giggled
    and tittered, and finally blurted out...

    >
    > Dimitri wrote:
    >> Other than cinnamon toast and cold cereal or a sandwich what was the
    >> first thing you cooked, and about how old were you?
    >>
    >> I distinctly trying my hand at scrambled eggs Mexican style at about
    >> 11 ( after they cooked I needed to drain off the extra liquid from the
    >> tomatoes I put in).
    >>
    >> I second attempt was a pineapple upside-down cake in an old cast iron
    >> pan swerved with whipped cream about 3 yeas later. That one turned out
    >> very well. ;-)
    >>
    >> Dimitri

    >
    > Clam pasta, 1950s style... This dish brings back soulful memories.
    >
    > 1 cube butter
    > chopped garlic
    > 1 small can chopped clams
    > 1/4 cup chopped parsley
    > salt and pepper
    >
    > Melt butter in a sauce pan. Gently sautee/simmer garlic for 3 or 4
    > minutes - don't burn. Add the clams juice. Simmer very gently to
    > reduce. Add the clams and parsley, simmer gently until the clams are
    > heated through. Season with salt and pepper.
    > Serve over boiled spaghetti.


    Mom had debilitating migraines when I was very young. She taught me how to
    scramble eggs and make toast, and how to open a can of soup and heat it
    when I was about five, in case she was unable to make something for me.

    Following a recipe? I remember making Apple Snow from The Good
    Housekeeping Cookbook when I was 9.

    Wayne
     
  3. Steve Calvin

    Steve Calvin Guest

    roxmarie wrote:
    > Dimitri wrote:
    >
    >>Other than cinnamon toast and cold cereal or a sandwich what was the

    >
    > first
    >
    >>thing you cooked, and about how old were you?


    I was about 6. I guess that I've always been a fussy eater, which
    according to George Carlin is a euphemism for "BIG PAIN IN THE ASS". ;-)
    Probably true.

    Anyhow, one morning she made me eggs over easy and the white was runny
    around the yolk and I complained about it and she apparently was either
    in a bad mood or had had enough of me and said: "FINE, cook 'em
    yourself from now on." And with that, the next morning was when I
    started cooking. I had toast, bacon, and scrambled (unintentionally)
    eggs. It got better from there though. (thank heaven)

    --
    Steve

    Every job is a self-portrait of the person who did it.
    Autograph your work with excellence.
     
  4. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    roxmarie wrote:
    > Dimitri wrote:
    >> Other than cinnamon toast and cold cereal or a sandwich what was the
    >> first thing you cooked, and about how old were you?
    >>
    >> Dimitri

    >
    > Clam pasta, 1950s style... This dish brings back soulful memories.
    >

    Rice. Age 9.

    Jill
     
  5. Joelle

    Joelle Guest

    I remember my first dinner party when I was in college, I invited the pastor
    and his wife over :) And my mom. I made chicken wings and dumplings. Why
    wings - I have no idea, that's just about the worst part of the chicken as far
    as I'm concerned..

    And I made a peach pie from scratch. Best pie crust I ever tasted My mom told
    me I was crazy but I had no trouble so I didn't understand what the big deal
    was.

    Never again have I made a decent pie crust. I don't even try anymore, I buy
    the frozen ones nows.

    Joelle
    "The children who need love the most will always ask for it in the most
    unloving ways" ~ Words of a teacher quoted by Russell Barkley~
     
  6. On 12 Jan 2005 21:50:26 -0800, "roxmarie" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> first
    >> thing you cooked, and about how old were you?


    I started cooking with my mom before I can remember. As far as I know I
    came out of the womb cooking. :) I got my first cookbook when I was like 6
    or so. I hardly needed any help reading the recipes, just needed to be told
    what some of the ingredients were. Of course it was a KIDs cookbook, so it
    was really simple stuff.

    I was able to make the main course for dinner by the time I was 7 (my
    speciality was pork chops baked an orange marmalade sauce that my mother
    loved). I was baking from cake mixes earlier than that, and baking from
    scratch after about age 8 (this is primarily on my own, I was making more
    complicated things with my mother all along).

    I have *always* loved cooking. Both sides of my family, right back to
    great grandparents on both sides (pretty much all of them) were great
    cooks. Most of the things they made were simple midwestern fare and they
    had the things they were especially good at making, but even the men could
    cook up a mess of fish and taters and have it come out awesome.

    I learned cooking by taste and smell from an early age. Mom and maternal
    Gramma both cooked by smell and were really good at helping me learn how to
    do it.

    My paternal grandfather made fantastic pickles and saurkraut, and both him
    and my maternal grampa always had flourishing gardens full of fresh
    vegetables throughout the growing season. They lived through the
    depression, they knew how to get by.

    *sigh* I miss my family. All I have left are Grampa and Dad now. Dad's
    disabled by strokes and Grampa's more distant than I like 'cos we live in
    Vermont and he lives in Florida (and he doesn't have a computer and I'm a
    dork who can't pick up a damn phone). I should call him...

    --
    Siobhan Perricone
    Humans wrote the bible,
    God wrote the rocks
    -- Word of God by Kathy Mar
     
  7. On 13 Jan 2005 06:22:08 GMT, Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Mom had debilitating migraines when I was very young. She taught me how to
    >scramble eggs and make toast, and how to open a can of soup and heat it
    >when I was about five, in case she was unable to make something for me.
    >
    >Following a recipe? I remember making Apple Snow from The Good
    >Housekeeping Cookbook when I was 9.
    >

    I still have a copy of _Betty Crocker's Cook Book for Boys and Girls_,
    copyright 1957. I actually cooked a meal for the family every now and
    then from it (I was 9 when I got the cookbook). What was pretty cool
    for the time was it was a "Boys and Girls" cookbook, not one just
    aimed at girls.. OTOH, the cover shows Mom and Daughter working away
    using beater and spoon in batter laden bowls, while Son is in the
    background tasting something out of a casserole <g>

    First memory of cooking something with more than 3 ingredients was a
    yellow cake. Came out looking like a yellow manhole cover. I had
    forgotten to put in the egg.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA


    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  8. On Thu 13 Jan 2005 08:48:23p, Terry Pulliam Burd tittered and giggled, and
    giggled and tittered, and finally blurted out...

    > On 13 Jan 2005 06:22:08 GMT, Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Mom had debilitating migraines when I was very young. She taught me how
    >>to scramble eggs and make toast, and how to open a can of soup and heat
    >>it when I was about five, in case she was unable to make something for
    >>me.
    >>
    >>Following a recipe? I remember making Apple Snow from The Good
    >>Housekeeping Cookbook when I was 9.
    >>

    > I still have a copy of _Betty Crocker's Cook Book for Boys and Girls_,
    > copyright 1957. I actually cooked a meal for the family every now and
    > then from it (I was 9 when I got the cookbook). What was pretty cool
    > for the time was it was a "Boys and Girls" cookbook, not one just
    > aimed at girls.. OTOH, the cover shows Mom and Daughter working away
    > using beater and spoon in batter laden bowls, while Son is in the
    > background tasting something out of a casserole <g>
    >
    > First memory of cooking something with more than 3 ingredients was a
    > yellow cake. Came out looking like a yellow manhole cover. I had
    > forgotten to put in the egg.
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    > AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA


    When I was 11 I checked a book out of the local library, entitled _The
    Boy's Cookbook_. It was out of print, and I liked it so much that I talked
    my mom into telling the library I lost it and we paid for it.

    I still use a few recipes from it today, especially the baked almond
    cheesecake. It's one of the best I've ever made.

    Wayne
     
  9. salgud

    salgud Guest

    I don't remember how young I was when I started making peanut butter
    and jelly sandwiches, but that's not cooking. My father couldn't boil
    water, and my mother was at best an adequate cook, except for her
    excellent baking.
    I think I was around 11 when I decided to start making my favorite
    meat, other than pb&j, baked beans. Got pretty good and heating up a
    can with some ketchup and brown sugar.
    My first wife and I both loved Chinese food, and the friend who'd
    introduced us to it gave us a wok, cleaver and cutting board for a
    wedding gift. We bought a authentic Chinese cookbook in Chinatown on
    our pre-wedding honeymoon (on the way to get married). I offered to do
    the Chinese cooking to give her a break. I still to Asian cooking,
    Chinese and Cambodian, mostly, and still use the sweet and sour recipe
    from that cookbook, though the cookbook is long gone.
    But I really got to cooking after my divorce. I had my 3 boys half the
    time. and just couldn't feed them pizza 3 nights a week. Bought my
    first cookbook since the honeymoon and started learning. Still have
    that cookbook, and still use it occasionally.
     
  10. On 14 Jan 2005 04:09:02 GMT, Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    >When I was 11 I checked a book out of the local library, entitled _The
    >Boy's Cookbook_. It was out of print, and I liked it so much that I talked
    >my mom into telling the library I lost it and we paid for it.
    >
    >I still use a few recipes from it today, especially the baked almond
    >cheesecake. It's one of the best I've ever made.
    >

    My son, who has now presented me with my first grandchild, is trying
    to help in the kitchen, so for Christmas, I gave him a cookbook
    called, _A Man, A Can, and A Plan_. He LOVES it! It's about the most
    bare bones cookbook you can imagine, made to withstand being dropped
    into a boiling vat of beer and has 3 ingredients for each dish. I'm
    not proud of having raised a kitchen-challenged child, mind you.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA


    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  11. On Fri 14 Jan 2005 08:34:55p, Terry Pulliam Burd tittered and giggled, and
    giggled and tittered, and finally blurted out...

    > On 14 Jan 2005 04:09:02 GMT, Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>When I was 11 I checked a book out of the local library, entitled _The
    >>Boy's Cookbook_. It was out of print, and I liked it so much that I
    >>talked my mom into telling the library I lost it and we paid for it.
    >>
    >>I still use a few recipes from it today, especially the baked almond
    >>cheesecake. It's one of the best I've ever made.
    >>

    > My son, who has now presented me with my first grandchild, is trying
    > to help in the kitchen, so for Christmas, I gave him a cookbook
    > called, _A Man, A Can, and A Plan_. He LOVES it! It's about the most
    > bare bones cookbook you can imagine, made to withstand being dropped
    > into a boiling vat of beer and has 3 ingredients for each dish. I'm
    > not proud of having raised a kitchen-challenged child, mind you.
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    > AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA


    Well, don't despair, Terry. After having been criticized by her husband
    for extravagent grocery shopping as well as her effots at cooking, bought
    him exactly the same book you gave your son, and presented it with the
    comment that she would no longer be cooking for him, only herself. He soon
    "graduated" from that book and bought others, turning himself into a rather
    credible cook.

    Wayne
     
  12. Hogrider

    Hogrider Guest

    My first cooking experience was a failed experiment with steak :( (not
    counting breakfast...any idiot can cook bacon and eggs).

    I greased the pan thoroughly and overcooked the steak (no seasoning). It was
    as tough as shoe leather and had no leather!! Damn shame...I'd love to have
    a cut like that now!
     
  13. Hogrider

    Hogrider Guest

    Hey you! I'm 40 years old...only recently began cooking again after some
    unpleasant experiences cooking in my 20's. I don't have a cookbook..but I
    have something better. My mother is 75 years old and a master cook. She sure
    put a lot of meat on my bones. Anyway, over the last couple years I've
    demanded she teach me how she makes some of her best recipes ( I didn't tell
    her why...but I know I'll lose her some day and I want to keep eating her
    food, if nothing else)...and surprisingly she relented. Mama has taught me
    fried chicken to pork chops to meat loaf, etc...all the things I love! Well
    except for one...I just taught mama how to cook steak (weird she never
    learned to cook steak well!)! Plus, amazingly, I have a "talent" for gravy
    that boggles her mind. Except for one thing....I've cut the spices down to
    the ones that REALLY matter for taste/simplicity. I'm a bachelor who doesn't
    want to spend 10 hours cooking dinner for myself (and don't have the time
    even if I wanted to).

    Wish I'd ran into the cookbook you mentioned several years ago.



    "Terry Pulliam Burd" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 14 Jan 2005 04:09:02 GMT, Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>When I was 11 I checked a book out of the local library, entitled _The
    >>Boy's Cookbook_. It was out of print, and I liked it so much that I
    >>talked
    >>my mom into telling the library I lost it and we paid for it.
    >>
    >>I still use a few recipes from it today, especially the baked almond
    >>cheesecake. It's one of the best I've ever made.
    >>

    > My son, who has now presented me with my first grandchild, is trying
    > to help in the kitchen, so for Christmas, I gave him a cookbook
    > called, _A Man, A Can, and A Plan_. He LOVES it! It's about the most
    > bare bones cookbook you can imagine, made to withstand being dropped
    > into a boiling vat of beer and has 3 ingredients for each dish. I'm
    > not proud of having raised a kitchen-challenged child, mind you.
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    > AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA
    >
    >
    > "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    > old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    > waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."
    >
    > -- Duncan Hines
    >
    > To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  14. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Hogrider wrote:

    > Hey you! I'm 40 years old...only recently began cooking again after some
    > unpleasant experiences cooking in my 20's. I don't have a cookbook..but I
    > have something better. My mother is 75 years old and a master cook. She sure
    > put a lot of meat on my bones. Anyway, over the last couple years I've
    > demanded she teach me how she makes some of her best recipes ( I didn't tell
    > her why...but I know I'll lose her some day and I want to keep eating her
    > food, if nothing else)...and surprisingly she relented. Mama has taught me
    > fried chicken to pork chops to meat loaf, etc...all the things I love!


    A master cook and she never taught you to cook until you were 40? Pity. My
    mother is a pretty good cook and she started teaching me and my brothers when we
    were kids. She never had any problem sharing her successes with us, or trying
    to learn something from us.



    > Well
    > except for one...I just taught mama how to cook steak (weird she never
    > learned to cook steak well!)! Plus, amazingly, I have a "talent" for gravy
    > that boggles her mind. Except for one thing....I've cut the spices down to
    > the ones that REALLY matter for taste/simplicity.


    I hate to imagine what those are. I have done most of the cooking in my house
    for more than 30 years. I dumped a few spice mixtures from my early years after
    finding better things, and my spice and herb cabinet is crammed with all sorts
    of things. There would be more if I had more room. I generally go for simple
    dishes rather than the really complicated, but a touch of the right herbs and
    spices can do a lot for a simple dish.


    > I'm a bachelor who doesn't
    > want to spend 10 hours cooking dinner for myself (and don't have the time
    > even if I wanted to).


    Who spends 10 hours cooking a meal? My wife and I both worked and we never had
    trouble cooking up a quick, delicious meal.
     
  15. On 15 Jan 2005 03:57:15 GMT, Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Well, don't despair, Terry. After having been criticized by her husband
    >for extravagent grocery shopping as well as her effots at cooking, bought
    >him exactly the same book you gave your son, and presented it with the
    >comment that she would no longer be cooking for him, only herself. He soon
    >"graduated" from that book and bought others, turning himself into a rather
    >credible cook.


    Oh, thank you, Wayne, for giving me a little hope :) The kid was
    raised by a cook hobbyist and it looks like nothing stuck. I do recall
    him coming in from play one afternoon when he was about 8, strolling
    into the kitchen and observing his mother making dinner and perusing
    the cookbook. His comment to his sister was a wailed, "Oh, NO! We're
    having Julia Child for dinner!" This is a kid whose favorite meal was
    Oscar Mayer hot dogs or mac and cheese.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA


    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
     
  16. On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 17:54:28 -0800, Terry Pulliam Burd
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Oh, thank you, Wayne, for giving me a little hope :) The kid was
    >raised by a cook hobbyist and it looks like nothing stuck. I do recall
    >him coming in from play one afternoon when he was about 8, strolling
    >into the kitchen and observing his mother making dinner and perusing
    >the cookbook. His comment to his sister was a wailed, "Oh, NO! We're
    >having Julia Child for dinner!" This is a kid whose favorite meal was
    >Oscar Mayer hot dogs or mac and cheese.


    At least homemade mac and cheese?

    --
    Siobhan Perricone
    Humans wrote the bible,
    God wrote the rocks
    -- Word of God by Kathy Mar
     
  17. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sun, 16 Jan 2005 16:33:41 GMT, Dog3 <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > I was not allowed to use the stove yet so it was
    > all microwaved.

    <snip>
    > this was like 40 years ago. How time flies.


    Boy, your family was rich and on the cutting edge - I didn't
    buy my first microwave until 1975 and paid something like
    $500 or $600 for it (1000 watts). That was way too much $
    in today's terms, but it was worth it at the time.

    sf
     
  18. Steve Calvin

    Steve Calvin Guest

    sf wrote:
    > On Sun, 16 Jan 2005 16:33:41 GMT, Dog3 <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >> I was not allowed to use the stove yet so it was
    >> all microwaved.

    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >>this was like 40 years ago. How time flies.

    >
    >
    > Boy, your family was rich and on the cutting edge - I didn't
    > buy my first microwave until 1975 and paid something like
    > $500 or $600 for it (1000 watts). That was way too much $
    > in today's terms, but it was worth it at the time.
    >
    > sf


    Agreed. The first microwave (radarrange actually) hit the consumer
    market in '67 so you guys must have had one of the first ones!

    --
    Steve

    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving isn't for you.
     
  19. On Sun 16 Jan 2005 12:39:58p, Steve Calvin tittered and giggled, and
    giggled and tittered, and finally blurted out...

    > sf wrote:
    >> On Sun, 16 Jan 2005 16:33:41 GMT, Dog3 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> I was not allowed to use the stove yet so it was all microwaved.

    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >>>this was like 40 years ago. How time flies.

    >>
    >>
    >> Boy, your family was rich and on the cutting edge - I didn't
    >> buy my first microwave until 1975 and paid something like
    >> $500 or $600 for it (1000 watts). That was way too much $
    >> in today's terms, but it was worth it at the time.
    >>
    >> sf

    >
    > Agreed. The first microwave (radarrange actually) hit the consumer
    > market in '67 so you guys must have had one of the first ones!
    >


    Tappan actually introduced one a few years earlier, but it only found its
    way into a small number of custom home kitchens. At that time they were
    installed like a wall oven.

    Wayne
     
  20. Steve Calvin

    Steve Calvin Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Sun 16 Jan 2005 12:39:58p, Steve Calvin tittered and giggled, and
    > giggled and tittered, and finally blurted out...
    >
    >
    >>sf wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sun, 16 Jan 2005 16:33:41 GMT, Dog3 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> I was not allowed to use the stove yet so it was all microwaved.
    >>>
    >>><snip>
    >>>
    >>>>this was like 40 years ago. How time flies.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Boy, your family was rich and on the cutting edge - I didn't
    >>>buy my first microwave until 1975 and paid something like
    >>>$500 or $600 for it (1000 watts). That was way too much $
    >>>in today's terms, but it was worth it at the time.
    >>>
    >>>sf

    >>
    >>Agreed. The first microwave (radarrange actually) hit the consumer
    >>market in '67 so you guys must have had one of the first ones!
    >>

    >
    >
    > Tappan actually introduced one a few years earlier, but it only found its
    > way into a small number of custom home kitchens. At that time they were
    > installed like a wall oven.
    >
    > Wayne


    hm, didn't know that. I thought that the Amana was the first one out for
    the general consumer.

    --
    Steve

    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving isn't for you.
     
Loading...