Real RBR Members:



T

Tom Kunich

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]..
On Dec 29, 7:51 pm, "Tom Kunich" <[email protected] com> wrote:
> > What cycling related stuff did you get for Christmas? Did you get in any
> > riding?

>
> Couple rides up in Connecticut with my dad who is still racking up the
> miles at 68 years of age.


Last year I rode from San Leandro to Santa Barbara with a guy 75 years old
and I had to work to keep up with him. At one point on of the guys kicked
the (loaded touring bikes mind you) pace up to 22 mph and we rode about 10
miles like that with the old guy in #2 spot.

Keep cycling forever!
 
B

Bill C

Guest
On Dec 31, 6:55 pm, "Tom Kunich" <[email protected] com> wrote:
> <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
> news:[email protected]..
> On Dec 29, 7:51 pm, "Tom Kunich" <[email protected] com> wrote:
>
> > > What cycling related stuff did you get for Christmas? Did you get in any
> > > riding?

>
> > Couple rides up in Connecticut with my dad who is still racking up the
> > miles at 68 years of age.

>
> Last year I rode from San Leandro to Santa Barbara with a guy 75 years old
> and I had to work to keep up with him. At one point on of the guys kicked
> the (loaded touring bikes mind you) pace up to 22 mph and we rode about 10
> miles like that with the old guy in #2 spot.
>
> Keep cycling forever!


Last time we were living in Germany a lot of our rides were uphill out
of Kaiserslautern out through small villages. A lot of these had
10-12% grades for a klick or two. We used to run into one old woman
pretty regularly, had to be 65+ on an old utility bike w/Baskets she
had been riding since she was a girl, pretty much. Same bike, same
hill, couple of trips every day for decades. It was no big deal for
her. No riding clothes, pants or dresses, sweaters, whatever, and
she'd just cruise up the hill like it was flat. She was really
amazing, but not all that unusual out in the smaller villages.
Guaranteed to keep you humble ;-)
Bill C
 
M

Michael Baldwin

Guest
>lets see Christmas Day, ah yes. Slow roasted prime rib,
>three cheese potatoes, garden fresh green beans, pumpkin pie, and
>about a bucket of that chex mix stuff, plus all
>the decadent goodies,


...and I just finished the last piece of Chocolate Silk Pie...

Best Regards - Mike Baldwin
 
F

Fred Fredburger

Guest
Tom Kunich wrote:
> "Fred Fredburger" <[email protected]> wrote in
> message news:[email protected]
>> Tom Kunich wrote:
>>> What cycling related stuff did you get for Christmas? Did you get in
>>> any riding?

>>
>> I asked for no bicycle stuff, because I've already got tons. I asked
>> for pictures, prints, art to put on the walls. I knew it would please
>> my wife to shop for such things. One of the things she bought looks like:
>>
>> http://www.gingerbreadshows.com/greaterartgallery/gag3.jpg

>
> I'm pretty touchy about stuff that I hang on my walls. I actually have
> taste in art where most others think that you put pictures on the wall
> to cover cracks or to make the wall look more balanced. I remember being
> in an art store one time when a woman came in and asked for something
> "large and green".
>
> Most of the stuff hanging on my walls would sell as REAL(tm) art instead
> of Dali prints.
>


My wife has a Masters in Fine Arts, but I'm sure you know LOTS more
about it than she does.

Your disapproval generally validates the value/truth of the thing you're
disapproving of. So I appreciate your opinion for that reason.
 
R

Ryan Cousineau

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Tom Kunich" <[email protected] com> wrote:

> "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]m...
> >
> > I put some relatively low profile tires on my 'cross bike (just enough
> > tread not to kill myself in the slush/snow/ice, and not so much as to
> > make the clean pavement sections unbearable), bundled up, and have
> > been riding my 'cross bike for the last couple of weeks. The slower
> > speeds keep the wind chill to a manageable level and the rolling
> > resistance inherent in the 'cross knobbies is keeping the workout
> > worth doing.

>
> What tires did you use. I'm putting together a winter bike and want
> something just short of knobbies that will still stop in slippery stuff.


How slippery? The choices for "just short of knobbies" are stuff like
inverted-tread hybrid tires (I have some Avocet 28 mm like that) or
slightly knobbier fare. I use WTB All Terrainasaurus "hybrid" tires,
which have closely spaced knobs that are quite large. The effect is to
have a nearly continuous tread surface, and reasonable grip in all
conditions, though it concedes mud-biting capability to real CX tires.

They're 32 mm tires, and roll acceptably well on roads, which is to say
that they're noticeably worse than any slick.

--
Ryan Cousineau [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com/
"My scenarios may give the impression I could be an excellent crook.
Not true - I am a talented lawyer." - Sandy in rec.bicycles.racing
 
On Dec 31 2007, 6:55 pm, "Tom Kunich" <[email protected] com> wrote:
> <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
> news:[email protected]..
> On Dec 29, 7:51 pm, "Tom Kunich" <[email protected] com> wrote:
>
> > > What cycling related stuff did you get for Christmas? Did you get in any
> > > riding?

>
> > Couple rides up in Connecticut with my dad who is still racking up the
> > miles at 68 years of age.

>
> Last year I rode from San Leandro to Santa Barbara with a guy 75 years old
> and I had to work to keep up with him. At one point on of the guys kicked
> the (loaded touring bikes mind you) pace up to 22 mph and we rode about 10
> miles like that with the old guy in #2 spot.
>
> Keep cycling forever!


It's always fun to see these guys out there going strong. My dad has
kept his group ride going for almost 40 years now. Every Sunday they
do 30-35 miles to breakfast, eat some pancakes and come back. Only
thing that has changed is the group doesn't ride in snow anymore and
if it's cold (25 deg F or below) then they wait for it to warm up a
bit.

There is one fellow in the group that is now in his mid-70s and he is
unreal. Exactly like the fellow Tom described. The older gents can't
accelerate and may lag a bit on the longer hills but give them a good
wheel and a constant pace and they go down the road just fine.

Hope I'm able to ride like that in 30 years.

BTW, Dad had 6200 miles on the bike this year and another 500
running.

Mark
 
S

Scott

Guest
On Dec 31 2007, 4:46 pm, "Tom Kunich" <[email protected] com> wrote:
> "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
> news:[email protected]m...
>
>
>
> > I put some relatively low profile tires on my 'cross bike (just enough
> > tread not to kill myself in the slush/snow/ice, and not so much as to
> > make the clean pavement sections unbearable), bundled up, and have
> > been riding my 'cross bike for the last couple of weeks.  The slower
> > speeds keep the wind chill to a manageable level and the rolling
> > resistance inherent in the 'cross knobbies is keeping the workout
> > worth doing.

>
> What tires did you use. I'm putting together a winter bike and want
> something just short of knobbies that will still stop in slippery stuff.


Tom,

Currently I'm using Bontrager Jones CX tires in 700x32. They're not
terribly aggressive in their tread pattern, but mostly I'm using them
because I had two pair hanging around that came off 'cross bikes that
I'd bought used over the past couple of years. For my first ride in
the snow, before I took the time to change tires, I used my Schwalbe
Racing Ralphs that I'd raced on for most of the season. Much better
tire for the nasty stuff, but too knarly for the pavement and too
expensive to wear out riding around on the roads.

I don't know if they'd work worth a damn in snow/ice, but Performance
markets a 700x35 kevlar belted tire that I've used on dirt roads where
they worked really well. See: http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=16500&subcategory_ID=5420

Scott
 
T

Tom Kunich

Guest
"Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]m...
>
> I don't know if they'd work worth a damn in snow/ice, but Performance
> markets a 700x35 kevlar belted tire that I've used on dirt roads where
> they worked really well. See:
> http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=16500&subcategory_ID=5420


We don't have snow and generally little ice in the San Francisco bay area,
but we have a lot of wet nasty roads, mud, and runoff.

I was looking ALL over for a good frame for a winter bike and happened to
look up on the garage ceiling and lo and behold there was an Italian Bianchi
25" frame! All this time I had one sitting right in front of me.

Well, looking around I discovered my spare cyclocross wheels. They have on
some green Vitoria Tigre Cross tires which work pretty well anywhere. And an
8-speed 12-28 Ultegra cassette that fit it.

Hmm, that old Campy seatpost fits in though the saddle will be about 1/2"
lower than my street bikes. That's OK since most of them feel a tiny bit
high anyway. And you have a touch more control if you're a little lower in
the saddle.

I have a lot of saddles so that's not a problem. Hey! There's a Nashbar
Compact crank that I picked up for a song and an Italian bottom bracket in
Isis drive. I don't know where the heck I got some of those "medium reach"
Ultegra brakes (probably from Rivendell knowing me) but they fit perfectly.

I wonder, there's too many scratches on the red paint to take a steel bike
out in the winter so I'll have to paint it. Do I paint it Celeste green or
that light blue that you see on some Bianchis which is in fact the true
color of Celeste (Sky Blue)?

Now, what the heck will shift an Ultegra 8-speed cassette? I switched a
couple of bikes over to barend shifters to keep in practice for the
cyclocross bike. And now I find that I pretty much prefer them to the 5
times more expensive STI Shifters which are only slightly more handy. So I
could put an older Ultegra derailleur and barends on it. Hmm, must make up
mind.....

Check for the next installment of "Confusion Alley".
 
T

Tom Kunich

Guest
"Fred Fredburger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Tom Kunich wrote:
>> "Fred Fredburger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>> Tom Kunich wrote:
>>>> What cycling related stuff did you get for Christmas? Did you get in
>>>> any riding?
>>>
>>> I asked for no bicycle stuff, because I've already got tons. I asked for
>>> pictures, prints, art to put on the walls. I knew it would please my
>>> wife to shop for such things. One of the things she bought looks like:
>>>
>>> http://www.gingerbreadshows.com/greaterartgallery/gag3.jpg

>>
>> I'm pretty touchy about stuff that I hang on my walls. I actually have
>> taste in art where most others think that you put pictures on the wall to
>> cover cracks or to make the wall look more balanced. I remember being in
>> an art store one time when a woman came in and asked for something "large
>> and green".
>>
>> Most of the stuff hanging on my walls would sell as REAL(tm) art instead
>> of Dali prints.
>>

>
> My wife has a Masters in Fine Arts, but I'm sure you know LOTS more about
> it than she does.
>
> Your disapproval generally validates the value/truth of the thing you're
> disapproving of. So I appreciate your opinion for that reason.


I find it interesting that you took that as some sort of criticism of that
particular picture instead of a comment in general. But then that is the
tenor of most of the postings here since those such as HC, Donald Munro,
William Asher, Amit and Henry so willingly followed the lead of the
Halfbright and Palajerk to turn this into a useless group.

I suggest you not take insult unless it is a lot plainer than what I wrote.

And by the way, perhaps you could explain to me how a Masters in Fine Art
could teach you art appreciation any better than simple observation? Do you
suppose taking tests on someone else's opinions somehow makes you a better
judge of art?
 
R

Ryan Cousineau

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Tom Kunich" <[email protected] com> wrote:

> "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]m...
> >
> > I don't know if they'd work worth a damn in snow/ice, but Performance
> > markets a 700x35 kevlar belted tire that I've used on dirt roads where
> > they worked really well. See:
> > http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=16500&subcategory_ID=542
> > 0

>
> We don't have snow and generally little ice in the San Francisco bay area,
> but we have a lot of wet nasty roads, mud, and runoff.


> Well, looking around I discovered my spare cyclocross wheels. They have on
> some green Vitoria Tigre Cross tires which work pretty well anywhere. And an
> 8-speed 12-28 Ultegra cassette that fit it.


Sounds like some lovely options, but my general feeling is that in wet
conditions, CX tires are worse than road tires. The mud and runoff would
have to verge on epic before a few mucky traversals on city streets can
justify running CX tires.

You may well feel otherwise. The only time I've deliberately chosen CX
tires for a road ride was the day heavy snowfall was predicted. The
fluffy stuff came down about a foot deep (and falling) by the time I was
returning home from work, and in the deep drifts, slush accumulation,
and universally snow-covered roads, the hybrid-type knobby tires (sort
of a passive-aggressive CX tread; close-spaced knobs) I used worked very
well.

On anything shy of serious mud, I'm using road tires.

--
Ryan Cousineau [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com/
"My scenarios may give the impression I could be an excellent crook.
Not true - I am a talented lawyer." - Sandy in rec.bicycles.racing
 
S

ST

Guest
On 12/30/07 3:24 AM, in article
[email protected]m, "Kurgan
Gringioni" <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Dec 29, 4:51 pm, "Tom Kunich" <[email protected] com> wrote:
>> What cycling related stuff did you get for Christmas? Did you get in any
>> riding?

>
>
>
> Dumbass -
>
>
> Only Freds get/want cycling stuff for Christmas.
>
>
> Happy Holidays!
>
> K. Gringioni.



You musta asked Santa to get barebacked...........
 
S

ST

Guest
On 12/30/07 6:21 AM, in article
[email protected], "Bob Helland"
<[email protected]> wrote:

> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
> says...
>> What cycling related stuff did you get for Christmas? Did you get in any
>> riding?

>
> Couple really cool cycling calendars.
>
> Not much riding. Had a bit of a virus for a couple weeks. Throat,
> head, sinus, etc.
>
> *NO* energy at all.
>
>
> How 'bout you?
>
>
> -Bob
>
>


I got one of these calendars!

http://operationcalendar.org/girls.html

Actually....... Miss October is one of our customers!!
 
H

Howard Kveck

Guest
In article <[email protected][74.223.185.199.nw.nuvox.net]>,
Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> wrote:

> In article <[email protected]>,
> "Tom Kunich" <[email protected] com> wrote:
>
> > "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]m...
> > >
> > > I don't know if they'd work worth a damn in snow/ice, but Performance
> > > markets a 700x35 kevlar belted tire that I've used on dirt roads where
> > > they worked really well. See:
> > > http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=16500&subcategory_ID=5
> > > 42
> > > 0

> >
> > We don't have snow and generally little ice in the San Francisco bay area,
> > but we have a lot of wet nasty roads, mud, and runoff.

>
> > Well, looking around I discovered my spare cyclocross wheels. They have on
> > some green Vitoria Tigre Cross tires which work pretty well anywhere. And
> > an
> > 8-speed 12-28 Ultegra cassette that fit it.

>
> Sounds like some lovely options, but my general feeling is that in wet
> conditions, CX tires are worse than road tires. The mud and runoff would
> have to verge on epic before a few mucky traversals on city streets can
> justify running CX tires.
>
> You may well feel otherwise. The only time I've deliberately chosen CX
> tires for a road ride was the day heavy snowfall was predicted. The
> fluffy stuff came down about a foot deep (and falling) by the time I was
> returning home from work, and in the deep drifts, slush accumulation,
> and universally snow-covered roads, the hybrid-type knobby tires (sort
> of a passive-aggressive CX tread; close-spaced knobs) I used worked very
> well.
>
> On anything shy of serious mud, I'm using road tires.


Yep, that is the best choice. More actual tire on the ground than knobbies is
always going to be a better option in the conditions we get here in the SF Bay Area.

--
tanx,
Howard

Now it's raining pitchforks and women,
But I've already got a pitchfork...

remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
 
D

Donald Munro

Guest
Tom Kunich wrote:
>> What cycling related stuff did you get for Christmas? Did you get in any
>> riding?


ST wrote:
> I got a .45 Semi-Auto so my bike stuff stays mine!


Only one ? You need two to make it onto the rbr hitlist.
 
S

Scott

Guest
On Jan 1, 6:24 pm, Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
>  "Tom Kunich" <[email protected] com> wrote:
>
> > "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> >news:[email protected]m...

>
> > > I don't know if they'd work worth a damn in snow/ice, but Performance
> > > markets a 700x35 kevlar belted tire that I've used on dirt roads where
> > > they worked really well.  See:
> > >http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=16500&subcategory....
> > > 0

>
> > We don't have snow and generally little ice in the San Francisco bay area,
> > but we have a lot of wet nasty roads, mud, and runoff.
> > Well, looking around I discovered my spare cyclocross wheels. They have on
> > some green Vitoria Tigre Cross tires which work pretty well anywhere. And an
> > 8-speed 12-28 Ultegra cassette that fit it.

>
> Sounds like some lovely options, but my general feeling is that in wet
> conditions, CX tires are worse than road tires. The mud and runoff would
> have to verge on epic before a few mucky traversals on city streets can
> justify running CX tires.
>
> You may well feel otherwise. The only time I've deliberately chosen CX
> tires for a road ride was the day heavy snowfall was predicted. The
> fluffy stuff came down about a foot deep (and falling) by the time I was
> returning home from work, and in the deep drifts, slush accumulation,
> and universally snow-covered roads, the hybrid-type knobby tires (sort
> of a passive-aggressive CX tread; close-spaced knobs) I used worked very
> well.
>
> On anything shy of serious mud, I'm using road tires.
>
> --
> Ryan Cousineau [email protected]://www.wiredcola.com/
> "My scenarios may give the impression I could be an excellent crook.  
> Not true - I am a talented lawyer." - Sandy in rec.bicycles.racing


You know, I've been wondering if I might be better of w/ wide road
tires instead of the low profile knobby cx tires I've been running,
but... over the past few weeks there has been a moderate amount of
slush or icy spots, w/ some new snow, all along the paths where I'm
doing most of my riding. Some of the side streets I use to get to/
from the paths have a LOT of packed snow/ice. Major streets are
dry.

Anyway, just the other day I'm toodling along one particular stretch
of bike path that hasn't seen much sunshine and I came up on some
knucklehead in jeans w/ his pants legs rolled up riding a fixie w/
what appeared to be typical road tires. I motored right past him
while he slithered and slipped all over the place at a snail's pace.

Yeah, rolling resistance from the knobbies sucks (except it IS adding
to the workout). I'm not going fast enough for the knobbies to cause
problems w/ traction on wet but otherwise clear roads, so the extra
traction afforded in those sections where road tires won't cut it is
very welcome.
 
R

Ryan Cousineau

Guest
In article
<[email protected]m>,
Scott <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Jan 1, 6:24 pm, Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> wrote:
> > In article <[email protected]>,
> >  "Tom Kunich" <[email protected] com> wrote:
> >
> > > "Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > >news:[email protected]m...

> >
> > > > I don't know if they'd work worth a damn in snow/ice, but Performance
> > > > markets a 700x35 kevlar belted tire that I've used on dirt roads where
> > > > they worked really well.  See:
> > > >http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=16500&subcategory...
> > > > 0

> >
> > > We don't have snow and generally little ice in the San Francisco bay
> > > area,
> > > but we have a lot of wet nasty roads, mud, and runoff.
> > > Well, looking around I discovered my spare cyclocross wheels. They have
> > > on
> > > some green Vitoria Tigre Cross tires which work pretty well anywhere. And
> > > an
> > > 8-speed 12-28 Ultegra cassette that fit it.

> >
> > Sounds like some lovely options, but my general feeling is that in wet
> > conditions, CX tires are worse than road tires. The mud and runoff would
> > have to verge on epic before a few mucky traversals on city streets can
> > justify running CX tires.
> >
> > You may well feel otherwise. The only time I've deliberately chosen CX
> > tires for a road ride was the day heavy snowfall was predicted. The
> > fluffy stuff came down about a foot deep (and falling) by the time I was
> > returning home from work, and in the deep drifts, slush accumulation,
> > and universally snow-covered roads, the hybrid-type knobby tires (sort
> > of a passive-aggressive CX tread; close-spaced knobs) I used worked very
> > well.
> >
> > On anything shy of serious mud, I'm using road tires.
> >
> > --
> > Ryan Cousineau [email protected]://www.wiredcola.com/
> > "My scenarios may give the impression I could be an excellent crook.  
> > Not true - I am a talented lawyer." - Sandy in rec.bicycles.racing

>
> You know, I've been wondering if I might be better of w/ wide road
> tires instead of the low profile knobby cx tires I've been running,
> but... over the past few weeks there has been a moderate amount of
> slush or icy spots, w/ some new snow, all along the paths where I'm
> doing most of my riding. Some of the side streets I use to get to/
> from the paths have a LOT of packed snow/ice. Major streets are
> dry.
>
> Anyway, just the other day I'm toodling along one particular stretch
> of bike path that hasn't seen much sunshine and I came up on some
> knucklehead in jeans w/ his pants legs rolled up riding a fixie w/
> what appeared to be typical road tires. I motored right past him
> while he slithered and slipped all over the place at a snail's pace.
>
> Yeah, rolling resistance from the knobbies sucks (except it IS adding
> to the workout). I'm not going fast enough for the knobbies to cause
> problems w/ traction on wet but otherwise clear roads, so the extra
> traction afforded in those sections where road tires won't cut it is
> very welcome.


If you're actually riding on snow, knobbies are an advantage. In
Vancouver (or San Francisco) the usual experience is of cleared but
possibly icy streets. Tom was talking about scenarios involving mud or
accumulated dirt/grit, which are iffy but might lean towards knobbies.
My feeling is that unless a substantial portion of your route was
actually a dirt road, you'd be better off with slicks and riding around
the sand accumulations.

My bete noire surface experience is black ice, which would certainly not
be any better on knobs. What I don't know is if ice studs actually
provide any advantage on the typical thin skins of black ice: they do
their magic on thick ice or hard snow by substantially biting in, but I
doubt that works when the ice is small fractions of a millimetre thick.

--
Ryan Cousineau [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com/
"My scenarios may give the impression I could be an excellent crook.
Not true - I am a talented lawyer." - Sandy in rec.bicycles.racing
 
On Jan 1, 6:22 pm, "Tom Kunich" <[email protected] com> wrote:

>
> > Your disapproval generally validates the value/truth of the thing you're
> > disapproving of. So I appreciate your opinion for that reason.

>
> I find it interesting that you took that as some sort of criticism of that
> particular picture instead of a comment in general.


dumbass,

you have no idea what makes you a ****.

where i worked they had absolutely terrible coffee before seminars,
but people drank it anyway. one time i asked another guy if he wanted
a cup while i was getting one and he says, "oh, i only drink
capuccino" which made me want to punch him in the face.

he could've said "No" or "No, the coffee here is terrible" or even "I
can't believe you would drink that ****!" all of which would make him
seem like less of a ****.

you did a capuccino. instead of commenting on the art itself you had
to make a little statement about yourself.
 
H

Howard Kveck

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Jan 1, 6:22 pm, "Tom Kunich" <[email protected] com> wrote:
>
> >
> > > Your disapproval generally validates the value/truth of the thing you're
> > > disapproving of. So I appreciate your opinion for that reason.

> >
> > I find it interesting that you took that as some sort of criticism of that
> > particular picture instead of a comment in general.

>
> dumbass,
>
> you have no idea what makes you a ****.
>
> where i worked they had absolutely terrible coffee before seminars,
> but people drank it anyway. one time i asked another guy if he wanted
> a cup while i was getting one and he says, "oh, i only drink
> capuccino" which made me want to punch him in the face.
>
> he could've said "No" or "No, the coffee here is terrible" or even "I
> can't believe you would drink that ****!" all of which would make him
> seem like less of a ****.
>
> you did a capuccino. instead of commenting on the art itself you had
> to make a little statement about yourself.


Isn't that what he always does? it's as predictable as rain on a summer afternoon
in Florida.

--
tanx,
Howard

Now it's raining pitchforks and women,
But I've already got a pitchfork...

remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
 
T

Tom Kunich

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> you have no idea what makes you a ****.
>
> you did a capuccino. instead of commenting on the art itself you had
> to make a little statement about yourself.


I suggest you read some of your own entries. One out of a hundred of your
postings isn't about you.