Real taquitos recipe?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by White Monkey, Mar 2, 2006.

  1. White Monkey

    White Monkey Guest

    Hi all,

    I have managed to get a tortilla press (not easy in the Netherlands), and
    would like to make taquitos for dinner. Given already oil-simmered and
    shredded pork, how would I proceed? Online searches reveal oversimplified
    recipes (pork, pepper, garlic powder) and what I consider to be inauthentic
    recipes (pork, can of taco sauce, can of green chilies). I just want
    authentic Mexican taquitos. I have on hand inauthentic chilies (hard to get
    anchos and stuff over here), cilantro, a can of tomatoes, and an immense
    array of spices.

    Thanks,
    Katrina
     
    Tags:


  2. "White Monkey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I have managed to get a tortilla press (not easy in the Netherlands), and
    > would like to make taquitos for dinner. Given already oil-simmered and
    > shredded pork, how would I proceed? Online searches reveal oversimplified
    > recipes (pork, pepper, garlic powder) and what I consider to be
    > inauthentic recipes (pork, can of taco sauce, can of green chilies). I
    > just want authentic Mexican taquitos. I have on hand inauthentic chilies
    > (hard to get anchos and stuff over here), cilantro, a can of tomatoes, and
    > an immense array of spices.


    I guess you have to ask yourself what is "real" and why is it so important.
    What is real to people in Mexico and in other places is constructing meal
    items with what you have on hand. If they use canned chiles and tortillas in
    a package then does that become "real"? Besides, you're not Mexican so it
    can never be 100% real. :^) Maybe just use ingredients that are available
    to you to make things you enjoy. Pleasure is real.
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    "White Monkey" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hi all,
    >
    > I have managed to get a tortilla press (not easy in the Netherlands), and
    > would like to make taquitos for dinner. Given already oil-simmered and
    > shredded pork, how would I proceed? Online searches reveal oversimplified
    > recipes (pork, pepper, garlic powder) and what I consider to be inauthentic
    > recipes (pork, can of taco sauce, can of green chilies). I just want
    > authentic Mexican taquitos. I have on hand inauthentic chilies (hard to get
    > anchos and stuff over here), cilantro, a can of tomatoes, and an immense
    > array of spices.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Katrina


    Hmmmm....that's a lot more ingredients than we use. We always just took
    the leftover roast (beef usually but sometimes pork) and shredded it.
    Warmed the corn tortillas in a hot, dry skillet. Placed the meat on the
    tortilla and rolled up and secured with a toothpick generally. These
    were then fried in oil and served with salsa, guacamole and sour cream
    on the side.

    marcella
     
  4. jay

    jay Guest

    On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 13:33:19 +0100, White Monkey wrote:

    > Hi all,
    >
    > I have managed to get a tortilla press (not easy in the Netherlands), and
    > would like to make taquitos for dinner. Given already oil-simmered and
    > shredded pork, how would I proceed? Online searches reveal oversimplified
    > recipes (pork, pepper, garlic powder) and what I consider to be inauthentic
    > recipes (pork, can of taco sauce, can of green chilies). I just want
    > authentic Mexican taquitos. I have on hand inauthentic chilies (hard to get
    > anchos and stuff over here), cilantro, a can of tomatoes, and an immense
    > array of spices.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Katrina


    So you want to make flour tortillas and wrap something in it? In Mexico
    it gets pretty simple. Whatever you have put it in the tortilla and eat
    it. I wouldn't mess with the toothpick idea.
     
  5. Frankly, if authenticity is just wrapping meat in a tortilla and frying
    it, I'd go for inauthentic any day. I used to marinade flank or round
    steak in oil, vinegar, chile powder and cumin, and it made the most
    fantastic taquitos imaginable. (The inauthentic guacamole probably
    helped.)
     
  6. jay

    jay Guest

    On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 07:41:37 -0800, pluto wrote:

    > Frankly, if authenticity is just wrapping meat in a tortilla and frying
    > it, I'd go for inauthentic any day. I used to marinade flank or round
    > steak in oil, vinegar, chile powder and cumin, and it made the most
    > fantastic taquitos imaginable. (The inauthentic guacamole probably
    > helped.)


    I agree. She did say taquito .. Please disregard my previous comments..I'm
    not sure what a tauqito is. I have seen those recipes but I don't know
    how "authentic" they are..looks like taco bell to me. But I admit I don't
    really know.
     
  7. White Monkey

    White Monkey Guest

    Thanks, everybody. I'm looking for the things called taquitos we used to buy
    in Tijuana way back when; I'll just try to get ahold of my aunt in the next
    few days and have her ask her neighbor Chucho, whose taquitos and tamales
    are from that region and fabulous, and meanwhile I'll wing it tonight.

    Meanwhile I seem to have lost the knack for making corn tortillas and he
    only Mexican restaurant in town won't sell me any. Tacos it is, tonight!
    --Katrina
     
  8. Andy

    Andy Guest

    jay <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 07:41:37 -0800, pluto wrote:
    >
    >> Frankly, if authenticity is just wrapping meat in a tortilla and
    >> frying it, I'd go for inauthentic any day. I used to marinade flank
    >> or round steak in oil, vinegar, chile powder and cumin, and it made
    >> the most fantastic taquitos imaginable. (The inauthentic guacamole
    >> probably helped.)

    >
    > I agree. She did say taquito .. Please disregard my previous
    > comments..I'm not sure what a tauqito is. I have seen those recipes
    > but I don't know how "authentic" they are..looks like taco bell to me.
    > But I admit I don't really know.



    In TJ off-off Revolution Ave., the locals ate from a taquito cart. They'd
    heat one side of a tortilla then oil the other side and heat it for about
    10 seconds, oiled side up they'd line it with shredded beef, some
    shredded cheese and guacamole and just roll it up it. It wasn't greasy to
    handle that way. You'd just mill around eating and just keep ordering
    taquitos and they'd keep count of how many you ate and when you were done
    you paid what they asked. They were so delicious, I'd eat six or more.
    Once a month for a year.

    And we'd always declare a bottle of Gusano Rojo mescal at the border.
    I've eaten the worm! So the story goes the purpose of the worm was they'd
    drop a worm in the bottle after it was filled and then sealed. When the
    worm sank to the bottom it was ready to sell. No extra effect.

    Andy
     
  9. Rusty

    Rusty Guest

    White Monkey wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I have managed to get a tortilla press (not easy in the Netherlands), and
    > would like to make taquitos for dinner. Given already oil-simmered and
    > shredded pork, how would I proceed? Online searches reveal oversimplified
    > recipes (pork, pepper, garlic powder) and what I consider to be inauthentic
    > recipes (pork, can of taco sauce, can of green chilies). I just want
    > authentic Mexican taquitos. I have on hand inauthentic chilies (hard to get
    > anchos and stuff over here), cilantro, a can of tomatoes, and an immense
    > array of spices.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Katrina


    This recipe is not authentic, but it's good:

    Flour Tortilla Chicken Flautas

    INGREDIENTS:

    * -1 (12 oz can) (or 1 1/2 cups) shredded cooked chicken - drained
    * -1/4 cup grated cheese (your choice)
    * -1/2 cup finely diced onions
    * -1/4 cup Salsa Verde
    * -1/2 tsp ground cumin
    * -2 tsp garlic powder
    * -1 tsp liquid smoke - mesquite
    * -12 flour tortillas
    * -4 cups cooking oil
    * -1/2 cup Thai Mae Ploy Sweet Chili Sauce for dipping
    *

    DIRECTIONS:

    1. -In a mixing bowl, stir together chicken, onion, salsa verde,
    cumin, garlic powder and liquid smoke.
    2. -Place 2 TBL of the chicken filling in a 1/2-inch wide by
    4-inches long strip along the edge of a flour tortilla.
    3. -Sprinkle grated cheese on the chicken filling.
    4. -Roll the tortilla into a cigar shape, starting on the side with
    the chicken filling. Secure the roll with a toothpick.
    5. -Heat cooking oil to 375-degrees.
    6. -Fry the rolled tortillas, a couple at a time, in the hot oil.
    7. -Serve with Thai Mae Ploy Sweet Chili Sauce on the side for
    dipping. (Available in Asian food section of most supermarkets -
    http://importfood.com/samp1001.html ).
    8. -Makes 12 large flautas.


    -Rusty
     
  10. RFC Lurker

    RFC Lurker Guest

    "White Monkey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I have managed to get a tortilla press (not easy in the Netherlands), and
    > would like to make taquitos for dinner. Given already oil-simmered and
    > shredded pork, how would I proceed? Online searches reveal oversimplified
    > recipes (pork, pepper, garlic powder) and what I consider to be

    inauthentic
    > recipes (pork, can of taco sauce, can of green chilies). I just want
    > authentic Mexican taquitos. I have on hand inauthentic chilies (hard to

    get
    > anchos and stuff over here), cilantro, a can of tomatoes, and an immense
    > array of spices.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Katrina


    Hi Katrina-

    While no recipes for taquitos per se, this guys site has a good collection
    of 'as real as it gets' authentic Mexican food recipes. You should be able
    to adapt one of the fillings described to fit taquitos.
    I truly envy this man and the life he has made for himself. The rest of his
    site is just as, if not more interesting that the kitchen section.

    http://www.rollybrook.com/kitchen.htm

    Back to lurking for me now.....
     
  11. jay

    jay Guest

    On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 10:21:40 -0600, Andy wrote:


    > In TJ off-off Revolution Ave., the locals ate from a taquito cart. They'd
    > heat one side of a tortilla then oil the other side and heat it for about
    > 10 seconds, oiled side up they'd line it with shredded beef, some
    > shredded cheese and guacamole and just roll it up it. It wasn't greasy to
    > handle that way. You'd just mill around eating and just keep ordering
    > taquitos and they'd keep count of how many you ate and when you were done
    > you paid what they asked. They were so delicious, I'd eat six or more.
    > Once a month for a year.


    > Andy


    Ok.. well I was thinking she was talking about..something rolled up and
    something inside as you described..but a lot of those "taquito" recipes
    I see up here in cyber space are rolled something, toothpicked and
    fried. I never saw the toothpick in Mexico ...saw beaucoup dentista's
    though. I think Mexicans eat mostly corn products in Mexico..here in
    TexMex land we like that flour tortilla, corn comes in second.

    Not gonna start thinking about mescal right now..all tequila's are
    mescal..all mescal's are not tequila ..Now that should start an argument...
    and the worm..marketing gimmick probably thought up by a gringo.
     
  12. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    "Marcella Peek" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "White Monkey" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Hi all,
    > >
    > > I have managed to get a tortilla press (not easy in the Netherlands),

    and
    > > would like to make taquitos for dinner. Given already oil-simmered and
    > > shredded pork, how would I proceed? Online searches reveal

    oversimplified
    > > recipes (pork, pepper, garlic powder) and what I consider to be

    inauthentic
    > > recipes (pork, can of taco sauce, can of green chilies). I just want
    > > authentic Mexican taquitos. I have on hand inauthentic chilies (hard to

    get
    > > anchos and stuff over here), cilantro, a can of tomatoes, and an immense
    > > array of spices.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > > Katrina

    >
    > Hmmmm....that's a lot more ingredients than we use. We always just took
    > the leftover roast (beef usually but sometimes pork) and shredded it.
    > Warmed the corn tortillas in a hot, dry skillet. Placed the meat on the
    > tortilla and rolled up and secured with a toothpick generally. These
    > were then fried in oil and served with salsa, guacamole and sour cream
    > on the side.
    >
    > marcella


    That's what I do, too, Marcella. Exactly.

    kili
     
  13. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    "Andy" <q> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > jay <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 07:41:37 -0800, pluto wrote:
    > >
    > >> Frankly, if authenticity is just wrapping meat in a tortilla and
    > >> frying it, I'd go for inauthentic any day. I used to marinade flank
    > >> or round steak in oil, vinegar, chile powder and cumin, and it made
    > >> the most fantastic taquitos imaginable. (The inauthentic guacamole
    > >> probably helped.)

    > >
    > > I agree. She did say taquito .. Please disregard my previous
    > > comments..I'm not sure what a tauqito is. I have seen those recipes
    > > but I don't know how "authentic" they are..looks like taco bell to me.
    > > But I admit I don't really know.

    >
    >
    > In TJ off-off Revolution Ave., the locals ate from a taquito cart. They'd
    > heat one side of a tortilla then oil the other side and heat it for about
    > 10 seconds, oiled side up they'd line it with shredded beef, some
    > shredded cheese and guacamole and just roll it up it. It wasn't greasy to
    > handle that way. You'd just mill around eating and just keep ordering
    > taquitos and they'd keep count of how many you ate and when you were done
    > you paid what they asked. They were so delicious, I'd eat six or more.
    > Once a month for a year.
    >
    > And we'd always declare a bottle of Gusano Rojo mescal at the border.
    > I've eaten the worm! So the story goes the purpose of the worm was they'd
    > drop a worm in the bottle after it was filled and then sealed. When the
    > worm sank to the bottom it was ready to sell. No extra effect.
    >
    > Andy
    >


    Ah, and then you'd go drink the pail of 6 Dos Equis, right? Been there,
    done that! :~)

    kili
     
  14. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    "Rusty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > White Monkey wrote:
    > > Hi all,
    > >
    > > I have managed to get a tortilla press (not easy in the Netherlands),

    and
    > > would like to make taquitos for dinner. Given already oil-simmered and
    > > shredded pork, how would I proceed? Online searches reveal

    oversimplified
    > > recipes (pork, pepper, garlic powder) and what I consider to be

    inauthentic
    > > recipes (pork, can of taco sauce, can of green chilies). I just want
    > > authentic Mexican taquitos. I have on hand inauthentic chilies (hard to

    get
    > > anchos and stuff over here), cilantro, a can of tomatoes, and an immense
    > > array of spices.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > > Katrina

    >
    > This recipe is not authentic, but it's good:
    >
    > Flour Tortilla Chicken Flautas
    >


    See, hold on, Flautas are made with FLOUR tortillas, TAQUITOS are made with
    small, taco-sized corn tortillas. That's the difference.

    kili
     
  15. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "kilikini" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >> And we'd always declare a bottle of Gusano Rojo mescal at the border.
    >> I've eaten the worm! So the story goes the purpose of the worm was
    >> they'd drop a worm in the bottle after it was filled and then sealed.
    >> When the worm sank to the bottom it was ready to sell. No extra
    >> effect.
    >>
    >> Andy
    >>

    >
    > Ah, and then you'd go drink the pail of 6 Dos Equis, right? Been
    > there, done that! :~)
    >
    > kili



    kili,

    We would do slammers! A thick/strong jigger 1.5 ounce shotglass. 1 oz.
    mescal, 0.5 oz. 7-up. Cover and grip the jigger with the palm of your hand
    and slam it on the table and then down the hatch as a bubbling foam.

    That's all I remember! ;)

    Andy
     
  16. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    "Andy" <q> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > "kilikini" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > >> And we'd always declare a bottle of Gusano Rojo mescal at the border.
    > >> I've eaten the worm! So the story goes the purpose of the worm was
    > >> they'd drop a worm in the bottle after it was filled and then sealed.
    > >> When the worm sank to the bottom it was ready to sell. No extra
    > >> effect.
    > >>
    > >> Andy
    > >>

    > >
    > > Ah, and then you'd go drink the pail of 6 Dos Equis, right? Been
    > > there, done that! :~)
    > >
    > > kili

    >
    >
    > kili,
    >
    > We would do slammers! A thick/strong jigger 1.5 ounce shotglass. 1 oz.
    > mescal, 0.5 oz. 7-up. Cover and grip the jigger with the palm of your hand
    > and slam it on the table and then down the hatch as a bubbling foam.
    >
    > That's all I remember! ;)
    >
    > Andy
    >
    >
    >


    LOL, been there, too, and woke up in San Ysidro. :~)

    kili
     
  17. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "kilikini" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >
    > "Andy" <q> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >> "kilikini" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> news:[email protected]:
    >>
    >> >> And we'd always declare a bottle of Gusano Rojo mescal at the
    >> >> border. I've eaten the worm! So the story goes the purpose of the
    >> >> worm was they'd drop a worm in the bottle after it was filled and
    >> >> then sealed. When the worm sank to the bottom it was ready to
    >> >> sell. No extra effect.
    >> >>
    >> >> Andy
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> > Ah, and then you'd go drink the pail of 6 Dos Equis, right? Been
    >> > there, done that! :~)
    >> >
    >> > kili

    >>
    >>
    >> kili,
    >>
    >> We would do slammers! A thick/strong jigger 1.5 ounce shotglass. 1
    >> oz. mescal, 0.5 oz. 7-up. Cover and grip the jigger with the palm of
    >> your hand and slam it on the table and then down the hatch as a
    >> bubbling foam.
    >>
    >> That's all I remember! ;)
    >>
    >> Andy
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > LOL, been there, too, and woke up in San Ysidro. :~)
    >
    > kili



    kili,

    Do tell, You were slamming in TJ?!!! Glad you made it back across the
    border in ANY condition!

    Andy
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>,
    "C. James Strutz" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "White Monkey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Hi all,
    > >
    > > I have managed to get a tortilla press (not easy in the Netherlands), and
    > > would like to make taquitos for dinner. Given already oil-simmered and
    > > shredded pork, how would I proceed? Online searches reveal oversimplified
    > > recipes (pork, pepper, garlic powder) and what I consider to be
    > > inauthentic recipes (pork, can of taco sauce, can of green chilies). I
    > > just want authentic Mexican taquitos. I have on hand inauthentic chilies
    > > (hard to get anchos and stuff over here), cilantro, a can of tomatoes, and
    > > an immense array of spices.

    >
    > I guess you have to ask yourself what is "real" and why is it so important.
    > What is real to people in Mexico and in other places is constructing meal
    > items with what you have on hand. If they use canned chiles and tortillas in
    > a package then does that become "real"? Besides, you're not Mexican so it
    > can never be 100% real. :^) Maybe just use ingredients that are available
    > to you to make things you enjoy. Pleasure is real.


    Good point! And why do so many discussions of Mexican food always have
    to bring up questions of authenticity? Sheesh! Mexican food is very,
    very diverse by region, by class, and more. And then there's the usual
    language usage problems. Here in my part (California) of La Frontera ,
    the word taco meant two different items. The restaurant taco used to
    mean a corn tortilla, crisply fried with a meat and garnish filling.
    Mexican co-workers told me that they would call that a taquito and that
    a taco was any tortilla rolled around a filling. The current usage here
    in most taquerias goes like: (soft) taco = heated corn tortillas
    (usually 2) rolled around filling; burrito = heated flour tortilla(s)
    rolled around filling; flauta = corn tortilla(s) rolled around filling
    and deep fried: chimichangas = 2 flour tortillas rolled around filling
    and deep fried. The older usage of taco is still in use and there are
    other inconsistencies. And then there's that available ingredients
    thing. When I was working in the winery/vineyard biz, I would often eat
    lunch with Mexican nationals. On more than one occasion I was served
    tacos made with weiners. So- Relax and eat well!

    D.M.
     
  19. sf

    sf Guest

    On Thu, 2 Mar 2006 13:33:19 +0100, White Monkey wrote:

    > Hi all,
    >
    > I have managed to get a tortilla press (not easy in the Netherlands), and
    > would like to make taquitos for dinner. Given already oil-simmered and
    > shredded pork, how would I proceed? Online searches reveal oversimplified
    > recipes (pork, pepper, garlic powder) and what I consider to be inauthentic
    > recipes (pork, can of taco sauce, can of green chilies). I just want
    > authentic Mexican taquitos. I have on hand inauthentic chilies (hard to get
    > anchos and stuff over here), cilantro, a can of tomatoes, and an immense
    > array of spices.
    >

    Did you find this recipe? It's simple too, but most home cooking is
    simple. http://www.mexgrocer.com/102-porktaquitos.html

    I can't imagine going to the trouble of making taquitos from scratch.
    They are sold frozen in a bag here. We pop them in the oven to heat
    and eat them as a snack with guacomole and salsa. Personally, I'd
    rather use that shredded pork for tamales or soft tacos.
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  20. sf

    sf Guest

Loading...