Really need help with a headset for a road bike



Callumgalla99

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Jan 21, 2021
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okay so last year i bought a bike frame on the cheap. i have currently built my bike but there is one big problem. for the life of me i don't what headset I need or what headset bearings to buy could some please help me

also this frame is identical to the NOVE road race bike, but i cant seem to find what headset is used in that bike either, any help appreciated.

The SPECTS
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dabac

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Sep 16, 2003
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Buy a Vernier caliper. Measure the bearing seats, in millimeters. Down to the tenths or better. Post the results here, or go shopping.
 

Callumgalla99

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Jan 21, 2021
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Buy a Vernier caliper. Measure the bearing seats, in millimeters. Down to the tenths or better. Post the results here, or go shopping.

thanks bud just purchased one should come tomorrow, ill post results then appreciate the help
 

Froze

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Jul 13, 2004
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Once you have those measurements I would get a Cane Creek 110 headset if they have one that will fit the measurements which they should.
 
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Froze

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Chris King use to be the go-to headset, but Cane Creek's 110 upped the game and Chris King hasn't so far answered back. But the CC has more seals than the CK plus the CC has extra seals for the cups. The main thing is that the CC supports and stabilizes the steerer tube better than the CK with a split compression ring the CK lacks, which has been a telling thing with the CK as steerer tubes will show wear after time because all CK uses is a rubber O ring. Plus the CC now has a lifetime warranty, the one I got has a 110 year warranty of which there is 102 years left on the warranty, but the CC has a 10 year warranty the last time I checked.

I'm not sure what is happening with headsets anyways, they are a pretty simple device, I have headsets made back in the early '80s with over 150,000 miles on them and never had any issues, yet the modern ones like the FSA Orbit Extreme Pro haven't been lasting long at all, I've heard a lot of people on the internet getting only 2 to 5 years out of them. Geez I have kids bikes from Walmart that the headsets lasted longer with more abuse then the expensive FSA did. So now the industry wants you to buy top dollar headsets in order for them to last virtually forever?

Everywhere you go on the bike forums the consensus is the CC 110 is the best one over the CC.
 

Germanrazor

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May 6, 2020
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Chris King use to be the go-to headset, but Cane Creek's 110 upped the game and Chris King hasn't so far answered back. But the CC has more seals than the CK plus the CC has extra seals for the cups. The main thing is that the CC supports and stabilizes the steerer tube better than the CK with a split compression ring the CK lacks, which has been a telling thing with the CK as steerer tubes will show wear after time because all CK uses is a rubber O ring. Plus the CC now has a lifetime warranty, the one I got has a 110 year warranty of which there is 102 years left on the warranty, but the CC has a 10 year warranty the last time I checked.

I'm not sure what is happening with headsets anyways, they are a pretty simple device, I have headsets made back in the early '80s with over 150,000 miles on them and never had any issues, yet the modern ones like the FSA Orbit Extreme Pro haven't been lasting long at all, I've heard a lot of people on the internet getting only 2 to 5 years out of them. Geez I have kids bikes from Walmart that the headsets lasted longer with more abuse then the expensive FSA did. So now the industry wants you to buy top dollar headsets in order for them to last virtually forever?

Everywhere you go on the bike forums the consensus is the CC 110 is the best one over the CC.
EMV
 

cyclintom

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Jan 15, 2011
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There are so many cheap headsets that the choice is endless and the only important thing is that they fit and have sealed bearings. dabac was quite correct that if you are installing parts yourself you have to know their sizes correctly and you can get that close enough with a metric Vernier caliper. Thank heavens they included the 1.5" taper headset for my new Felt gravel bike because I would never have guessed that they would put a tapered headset on a metal fork. Which then brought on the problem of having to buy a 1.5" fork base installation tool. The one I have fits everything but 1.5".

Imagine trying to guess whether you need a 26.8 27 or 27.2 mm seat post. Own a Vernier.
 

mrzagros

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Feb 25, 2021
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For many years, threaded headsets were the only type available. They require the fork's steerer tube to be cut to an exact measurement for use with a specific frame. The use of a threadless headset allows for greater adjustability and fine tuning in order to achieve the perfect fit. For this reason, threadless headsets have become the norm in recent years.
 

dabac

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Sep 16, 2003
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For many years, threaded headsets were the only type available. They require the fork's steerer tube to be cut to an exact measurement for use with a specific frame. The use of a threadless headset allows for greater adjustability and fine tuning in order to achieve the perfect fit. For this reason, threadless headsets have become the norm in recent years.
Threadless might make for easier installation - which you often immediately pay for in LESS, or more difficult adjustability of handle bar height.
For a casual rider, what do you think is a priority, making BUILDING the bike easier, or having a bike that’s easier to adjust according to personal preferences?
 

Froze

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Jul 13, 2004
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For many years, threaded headsets were the only type available. They require the fork's steerer tube to be cut to an exact measurement for use with a specific frame. The use of a threadless headset allows for greater adjustability and fine tuning in order to achieve the perfect fit. For this reason, threadless headsets have become the norm in recent years.

Try doing your own thoughts instead of plagiarizing someone else.

https://www.levelninesports.com/learn-center/bike-gear-education/bicycle-headsets-101
 

cyclintom

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Jan 15, 2011
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Let me make a comment about headsets. There is absolutely no reason to buy expensive headsets and pretend that quality makes the slightest difference. Forks DO NOT TURN. So this is not a wearing item. You should have sealed bearings so that dirt doesn't impinge and mess up the rollers but that is all. Fork head shafts used to be 1" and then went to 1 1/8th inches when they started breaking carbon fiber fork shafts. The larger diameter and the heavier layup made these thing pretty much bulletproof. Lately they invented tapered shafts that go from 1 1/8th or 1 1/4th" at the top to 1 1/2" at the bottom. If this was done for anything other than to fit an aero shape, it would be because they are attempting to make everything weigh nothing. And a fork shaft is not the place to save weight.

But the subject is a headset bearing. Like I said, they do not turn even one full revolution and expensive headsets are about as necessary as a poke in the eye with a sharp stick. Ball bearings are designed to turn at rapid rpm's under heavy load. They are used in a headset only to make it very light friction to turn the forks. You could as well use something like Teflon but although it would have low friction necessary, it couldn't withstand the load that striking bumps and so forth requires. Even cheap headsets are overbuilt.
 

Froze

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Jul 13, 2004
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So when I ride a bike the fork is locked into a straightforward position and the only way to turn a bike is by leaning?

Upper headset bearings usually do last a very long time, but it's the lower headset bearings that take all the pounding, and they are located in the second dirtiest area of a bike, at the top of the fork where the front wheel sprays up road grime.

Is this why they sell so many after-market headsets is because they don't wear out? and people are just replacing them for fun because they have nothing else to do with all that stimulus money setting around? Is this why they make replacement bearings because they never wear out?

Had you said there is no difference in performance between an expensive headset and a cheap one I would have agreed with you, but I don't agree with what you said about wear. The big difference between a cheap and an expensive headset is maintenance and durability.

And Cane Creek 110 headsets took a step further than anyone else in that the design of the headset supports the steerer tube better due to the compression ring they use, not to mention more seals than any other headset has.

But some of what you said can be correct, in that a good mid-grade headset like the Cane Creek 40 series can last a VERY long time as long as you keep up on the maintenance.
 

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