Rear canti on MTB sans frame cable hanger?



L

Luke

Guest
There is the option of a bolt-on (to the seat binder bolt) cable hanger
(available from loosescrews.com), but in this instance I wonder if it
will do. This MTB frame boasts standard 12 O'clock cable routing and
the seat-tube, extending 45 mm past the top-tube's top, requires a
collar; and a bolt on hanger would result in unconventional cable
routing: it would require the brake cable to be raised at least 45 mm
(acounting for the its bend) above the rear segment of the top-tube in
order to properly seat in the hanger. This can't be a good idea.

Luke
 
D

David Damerell

Guest
Quoting <[email protected]>:
>Canti brakes are not a good idea, period.


No doubt an explanation will be forthcoming. They seem to cause bikes to
stop, fit around big tyres, and don't use thin pads that wear out in no
time...
--
David Damerell <[email protected]> Kill the tomato!
Today is First Gouday, September.
 
M

Matt O'Toole

Guest
Luke wrote:

> There is the option of a bolt-on (to the seat binder bolt) cable
> hanger (available from loosescrews.com), but in this instance I
> wonder if it will do. This MTB frame boasts standard 12 O'clock cable
> routing and the seat-tube, extending 45 mm past the top-tube's top,
> requires a collar; and a bolt on hanger would result in
> unconventional cable routing: it would require the brake cable to be
> raised at least 45 mm (acounting for the its bend) above the rear
> segment of the top-tube in order to properly seat in the hanger. This
> can't be a good idea.


As long as the housing isn't bent too tightly, it shouldn't be a problem.

Matt O.
 
D

dvt

Guest
Luke wrote:
> There is the option of a bolt-on (to the seat binder bolt) cable hanger
> (available from loosescrews.com), but in this instance I wonder if it
> will do. This MTB frame boasts standard 12 O'clock cable routing and
> the seat-tube, extending 45 mm past the top-tube's top, requires a
> collar; and a bolt on hanger would result in unconventional cable
> routing: it would require the brake cable to be raised at least 45 mm
> (acounting for the its bend) above the rear segment of the top-tube in
> order to properly seat in the hanger. This can't be a good idea.


Noodles are your friend. Put a 45° noodle in the bolt-on hangar and the
cable routing will probably improve a bunch. You might even put a noodle
in the top tube cable stop, but I don't think you'll need it.

http://harriscyclery.net/site/page.cfm?PageID=49&SKU=BR2782

--
dvt at psu dot edu
 
S

StaceyJ

Guest
Luke wrote:
> There is the option of a bolt-on (to the seat binder bolt) cable hanger
> (available from loosescrews.com), but in this instance I wonder if it
> will do. This MTB frame boasts standard 12 O'clock cable routing and
> the seat-tube, extending 45 mm past the top-tube's top, requires a
> collar; and a bolt on hanger would result in unconventional cable
> routing: it would require the brake cable to be raised at least 45 mm
> (acounting for the its bend) above the rear segment of the top-tube in
> order to properly seat in the hanger. This can't be a good idea.
>
> Luke


Kona used to do a really cool little collar thing on their bikes. It
bolted on to the seat tube, below the seatpost clamp but just above the
top tube, and allowed a straight cable run along the top tube and
around the seat tube with no additional housing. You may want to
contact your friendly neighborhood Kona dealer and see if they still
stock them. The part that I'm thinking of came on a 1994 Kona Kiluea
(steel).

SYJ
 
S

StaceyJ

Guest
Correction - my bike was an Explosif (although I imagine a Kiluea of
the same vintage has the same part)
 
L

Luke

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
StaceyJ <[email protected]> wrote:

> Kona used to do a really cool little collar thing on their bikes. It
> bolted on to the seat tube, below the seatpost clamp but just above the
> top tube, and allowed a straight cable run along the top tube and
> around the seat tube with no additional housing. You may want to
> contact your friendly neighborhood Kona dealer and see if they still
> stock them. The part that I'm thinking of came on a 1994 Kona Kiluea
> (steel).


Yes, I was wondering if an option other than a binder-bolt mounted
cable hanger was available, but after much pointing and clicking on the
web was not able to locate one. Your tip warrants further
investigation.

Thanks
Luke
 
D

dvt

Guest
Luke wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> StaceyJ <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>>Kona used to do a really cool little collar thing on their bikes. It
>>bolted on to the seat tube, below the seatpost clamp but just above the
>>top tube, and allowed a straight cable run along the top tube and
>>around the seat tube with no additional housing. You may want to
>>contact your friendly neighborhood Kona dealer and see if they still
>>stock them. The part that I'm thinking of came on a 1994 Kona Kiluea
>>(steel).

>
>
> Yes, I was wondering if an option other than a binder-bolt mounted
> cable hanger was available, but after much pointing and clicking on the
> web was not able to locate one. Your tip warrants further
> investigation.
>
> Thanks
> Luke

Another idea from bikeforums.net, which I edited slightly...

---- oldskoolboarder wrote ----
You'll need some type of rear hanger, I used this:

Hanger http://www.loosescrews.com, put "DC-B1268" in the search box and
let 'er fly.

along w/ a Woodman clamp. I had to file down part of the hanger flat
because it was too big to put onto the seat tube w/ the clamp. You can
see that there's not a lot of hanging room but it works.

Like this
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y98/oldskoolboarder/IMG_1016.jpg
---- end edited quote ----

Good luck.

--
dvt at psu dot edu
 
J

Jasper Janssen

Guest
On 30 Sep 2005 16:02:30 +0100 (BST), David Damerell
<[email protected]> wrote:

>No doubt an explanation will be forthcoming. They seem to cause bikes to
>stop, fit around big tyres, and don't use thin pads that wear out in no
>time...


Well, direct-pulls are a lot simpler.

Jasper
 
D

David Damerell

Guest
Quoting Jasper Janssen <[email protected]>:
><[email protected]> wrote:
>>No doubt an explanation will be forthcoming. They seem to cause bikes to
>>stop, fit around big tyres, and don't use thin pads that wear out in no
>>time...

>Well, direct-pulls are a lot simpler.


If one doesn't count finding brake levers that work with them and with my
preferred handlebars, yes. :)

[I wouldn't say "a lot" simpler, either. The cantilever brake is not the
most complicated device known to man...]
--
David Damerell <[email protected]> flcl?
Today is Gorgonzoladay, September - a weekend.
 
J

Jasper Janssen

Guest
On 03 Oct 2005 13:20:30 +0100 (BST), David Damerell
<[email protected]> wrote:
>Quoting Jasper Janssen <[email protected]>:
>><[email protected]> wrote:
>>>No doubt an explanation will be forthcoming. They seem to cause bikes to
>>>stop, fit around big tyres, and don't use thin pads that wear out in no
>>>time...

>>Well, direct-pulls are a lot simpler.

>
>If one doesn't count finding brake levers that work with them and with my
>preferred handlebars, yes. :)


Indeed.

>[I wouldn't say "a lot" simpler, either. The cantilever brake is not the
>most complicated device known to man...]


Well.. that whole cable yoke thing is not terribly mechanically
complicated, but *conceptually* it's a whole level of indirection extra.

Jasper