Rear Cassette slipping

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by jaguar75, Sep 25, 2004.

  1. jaguar75

    jaguar75 New Member

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    As of late when I ride I have been having a problem with my rear Cassette. It is a 7 speed and when I am in 21st gear it pops/slips and then catches again. It is also starting to do it in 20th gear. What is happening and what can I do to fix it. I have a feeling that the sprokets are starting to strip on the hub and I fell a cassette replacement coming on?
     
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  2. ABogoni

    ABogoni New Member

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    I had the same problem with my Deore cassette. It's to do with the chain and cassette both being worn out. Just get a now drive system and you shouldn’t have any more problems.
     
  3. Muddy Buddy

    Muddy Buddy New Member

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    I was having the same problem this weekend. Before you buy any equipment make sure that your tension on your rear derailleur is properly tightened. You can use the barrel adjuster on the derailleur. The wire should feel firm when the chain is at your smallest chainring on the rear cassette. Also, you may need to play with the adjust screws on the rear derailleur for your high gear setting. That can interfere with your ability to get to your high gear rings. Secondly, find out if you rear derailleur hanger is bent (that was my problem and why I couldn't keep it in my highest gear).

    You can do both adjustments yourself, but the bike shop I was at used some fairly complicated equipment to true the angle of my derailleur hanger so you may want an expert opinion from a shop you really trust. When you go to the store, don't just drop the bike off and pick it up. Go with the guy/gal and watch them work on the bike. Ask them what they are doing and how you can adjust the bike yourself. You're paying for their service so you should get a quick lesson while you're there. Also, if you ride alot, this is something you will constantly be fidgeting with as mountain biking knocks alot of things out of whack (just the bumping and banging around can throw things out of alignment). There are basically six screws/adjustments you need to worry about for your entire drive system. After about 15 minutes with someone knowledgeable and patient you can fix alot of things yourself.

    Anyway, 15 minutes with my tech and I went from not being able to use my highest and lowest gears on a very cranky rear cassette to super fluid shifting through all the gears, just as a Deore LX is supposed to. Plus I now know what all of those adjustments and screws are for.

    Good luck.
     
  4. socalfeltrider

    socalfeltrider New Member

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    While the information you gave is correct and useful, I would however not encourage "customers" to try and enter a shops service area. The case may be that the shop where you have taken your bike does not mind this, but it has been my experience that customers simply are not allowed in the work area. 1) there is a liability for the shop. 2) that is how the shops generate income, and giving "free lessons" is a great way to go out of business. 3) most customers will not have the proper tools or workspace to do most of the repairs the shop guys can do.
    It would be like going into the kitchen at your favorite restaurant and asking the cook to show you what he is making for you.

    What I would recomend, if you are interested in working on your own bicycle, there are many books and resources available to teach you how to do it, buy one of those and do some research. Also, some shops provide clinics that you can attend.
    --socalfeltrider
     
  5. Muddy Buddy

    Muddy Buddy New Member

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    The liability issue is one for the shops to decide, though I haven't met anyone who has been mauled by a flying screwdriver and it's generally an excuse to keep nosy customers out of their workspace (like me). It depends on the layout of their workspace and if there's room for someone to keep out of the way and out of danger.

    As for stealing from the bike shop cookie jar by getting free lessons: with bike prices in the thousands of dollars and the myriad of things that can go wrong with expensive bike components, I don't think it's too much to ask your local shop for a tip on a fairly simple adjustment to your drive system. At least you won't have to haul your bike in every time the chain makes a clicking noise. In return, you should support your local shop by buying bikes and equipment from them rather than online catalogs if customer service is what you're after. I agree that there are loads of repairs that need a bike shop's expertise (like the bent hanger I encountered over the weekend) and I was glad to have their help.

    Personally, I like a bike shop where they show you what they're doing and you can better understand your machine. To me, it's part of the customer service and that's why I shop there.

    There are great publications on bike repair. Here's a good site I picked up from the tech forum that discusses derailleurs.

    http://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html
     
  6. gruppo

    gruppo New Member

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    Certainly a bike shop has a right to do business however they choose, but I only have one shop in my area that does not allow the customer in the workshop -- I don't go there anymore. Coincidentally, that one shop also provides the poorest service in the area.

    Bikes are notorious for needing minor adjustments and shops aren't open 24/7. Teaching a customer (at least one who is interested) to do minor adjustments to keep the bike running smoothly is just common courtesy. We're not talking about replacing a bottom bracket here, just simple derailleur and brake adjustments.

    Yes, there are books on the market, but none are as good as a hands-on demo. My advice; if your shop won't allow you in the service area to show you how to make routine adjustments, find another shop.

    IMHO, good bike shops know that all this is good customer service that doesn't drain money from the register, but will keep customers coming back for new bikes and parts as needed.

    Just my 2 cents.
     
  7. tombi

    tombi New Member

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    check the cassette for square ended teeth because you will need to replace any cogs with them. You can also get a new spring in your rear derailler which will renew the tension
     
  8. moparchris

    moparchris New Member

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    ok well i work in a bike shop and most shops you ant just walk in and expect them to service your bike on the spot, our shop is always booked out for servicing bikes at least 3 days in advance so people being able to watch you fix their bike is just not going to happen. we dont mind telling people how to adjust things or what exactly has been done to their bike to get it working right, its not hard and they SHOULD learn to adjust things sooner or later if theyre going to be doing any decent ammount of riding. also if anyone came into our shop wantking to know how to fix something we would tell them in enough detail so they can do it themselves if its something that they can.

    if you want any info on servicing your bike just look for some books or theres quite a few decent webpages around, like parktools site has quite a bit of info, i dont personally know of many other big ones but im sure youll find them. if you need any detailed explination go into a bike shop and ask the mechanic, im sure they wont muind taking a minute to explain it but dont expect them to do it right then and there unless its something really basic

    and if the chains slipping your probly gonna have to replace the rear cluster, chain and id reccomend replacing the jockeywheels in your rear deraleur and also the chainrings if theyre getting worn (the new chain wont mesh with a worn chainring well)
     
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