Rear disk brake adaptor



R

Rob G

Guest
Hello there - I'm an elderly neewbie to this group and would appreciate
some guidance on rear disk brakes.

Saturday saw my first adventure using a bike to get into some of the
more remote hills in Scotland. I've seen Peter Clinch's name on some
of the posts in the archives and he will recognise the long access into
Beinn Dearg behind Blair Atholl. 6 miles of mountain track to the
bottom of the hill, made all the more difficult by 2 inches of snow
from about 1000 ft up to the track summit at 1700 ft. The hill itself
had 12 inches which made walking quite difficult but the weather was
fantastic.

Anyway the return was where things got difficult as it was by then
freezing noticeably - the rear changer gave up and I had to walk a
kilometre of uphill, and then the rear V brake was just useless,
fortunately I've a disk on the front.

The question is - what adaptors exist to fit a disk to the rear? The
wheel hub is suitably machined and drilled but the frame has no
mounting points - it's a GT Tempest.

Thanks for any assistance

Rob
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
Rob G wrote on 20/11/2006 14:55 +0100:
> Hello there - I'm an elderly neewbie to this group and would appreciate
> some guidance on rear disk brakes.
>
> Saturday saw my first adventure using a bike to get into some of the
> more remote hills in Scotland. I've seen Peter Clinch's name on some
> of the posts in the archives and he will recognise the long access into
> Beinn Dearg behind Blair Atholl. 6 miles of mountain track to the
> bottom of the hill, made all the more difficult by 2 inches of snow
> from about 1000 ft up to the track summit at 1700 ft. The hill itself
> had 12 inches which made walking quite difficult but the weather was
> fantastic.
>
> Anyway the return was where things got difficult as it was by then
> freezing noticeably - the rear changer gave up and I had to walk a
> kilometre of uphill, and then the rear V brake was just useless,
> fortunately I've a disk on the front.
>
> The question is - what adaptors exist to fit a disk to the rear? The
> wheel hub is suitably machined and drilled but the frame has no
> mounting points - it's a GT Tempest.
>
> Thanks for any assistance
>


There's not much around these days for adapting and you might need to go
to the US unless you get lucky with anyone here. Here are a couple you
can get from the US:

http://www.therapycomponents.com/conversion.htm
http://www.discbrakeadapters.com/fs_show_item_details.php?item_id=4

The first has been around a long time and is pretty tried and tested and
similar to the no longer available Hope adapter.

--
Tony

"Anyone who conducts an argument by appealing to authority is not using
his intelligence; he is just using his memory."
- Leonardo da Vinci
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
In news:[email protected],
Rob G <[email protected]> tweaked the Babbage-Engine to tell us:

> The question is - what adaptors exist to fit a disk to the rear? The
> wheel hub is suitably machined and drilled but the frame has no
> mounting points - it's a GT Tempest.


I've got one of these:

http://www.withingtoncycles.co.uk/product.php?id=1469&node_id=1858

on a Trek 4300. Does exactly what it says on the tin; only downside is that
you have to remove the rear skewer completely in order to take the rear
wheel out. Which means that the jesus springs can then escape :-(

--
Dave Larrington
<http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk>
Mr. Charles Kennedy (Krankieburgh): Would the Prime Minister
care to comment on a report in today's Guardian that he: "arrived
late for a meeting with Jacques Chirac, smelling of alcohol, and
with body language suggesting a total disregard for the rights
of ethnic minorities, lone parents and laboratory animals"?
 
R

Rob G

Guest
Dave Larrington wrote:
> In news:[email protected],
> Rob G <[email protected]> tweaked the Babbage-Engine to tell us:
>
> > The question is - what adaptors exist to fit a disk to the rear? The
> > wheel hub is suitably machined and drilled but the frame has no
> > mounting points - it's a GT Tempest.

>
> I've got one of these:
>
> http://www.withingtoncycles.co.uk/product.php?id=1469&node_id=1858
>
> on a Trek 4300. Does exactly what it says on the tin; only downside is that
> you have to remove the rear skewer completely in order to take the rear
> wheel out. Which means that the jesus springs can then escape :-(
>
> --
> Dave Larrington



Thanks for the 2 quick inputs, guys; I've spent the afternoon doing net
trawl to see what I could find.

The bummer is that I don't have vertical dropout on that side of the
frame so that screws the a2Z device.

What I did find was this that intrigued me as I do have engineering kit
and skills

http://www.execulink.com/~dtierney/wmc/Magura/creative_solutions.htm

Can someone tell me if Magura and Shimano are different mounts for
instance ?


Rob
 
P

Paul Boyd

Guest
On 20/11/2006 16:13, Rob G said,

> What I did find was this that intrigued me as I do have engineering kit
> and skills


That sounds like much more fun!

> http://www.execulink.com/~dtierney/wmc/Magura/creative_solutions.htm


Did you read this bit:- "the stresses of a rear disc brake might be too
much for your seatstay and it might break. If you make and install a
home made disc brake adaptor then any damage or other consequences are
your problem."

I don't know how real a problem this might be, but just something to be
aware of.

--
Paul Boyd
http://www.paul-boyd.co.uk/
 
N

Nigel Cliffe

Guest
Rob G wrote:
> Thanks for the 2 quick inputs, guys; I've spent the afternoon doing
> net trawl to see what I could find.
>
> The bummer is that I don't have vertical dropout on that side of the
> frame so that screws the a2Z device.
>
> What I did find was this that intrigued me as I do have engineering
> kit and skills
>
> http://www.execulink.com/~dtierney/wmc/Magura/creative_solutions.htm
>
> Can someone tell me if Magura and Shimano are different mounts for
> instance ?


Think Magura uses the international standard, same as Shimano. It was Hayes
who had their own for a while.

However, unless you really want an engineering project, I think a new frame
is a simpler and cheaper option. Some quite nice MTB hard-tail frames are
around £225-£300. Obviously depends if your forks and other parts are 100%
transferable.


I've had a think about converting my circa 2000 Orange Gringo to disks
(dropouts are not flat, but have a "cover" above the axle nut), but decided
its a lot easier to change the frame than sort out a retro-fit.


If the original problems were cables icing up, then Magura hydraulic rim
brakes for the rear might be quicker, cheaper and probably as effective in
stopping. If the problems were garbage on the rims, then the Magura rim
brakes are no help.



- Nigel


--
Nigel Cliffe,
Webmaster at http://www.2mm.org.uk/
 
R

Rob G

Guest
Nigel Cliffe wrote:
> Rob G wrote:
> > Thanks for the 2 quick inputs, guys; I've spent the afternoon doing
> > net trawl to see what I could find.
> >
> > The bummer is that I don't have vertical dropout on that side of the
> > frame so that screws the a2Z device.
> >
> > What I did find was this that intrigued me as I do have engineering
> > kit and skills
> >
> > http://www.execulink.com/~dtierney/wmc/Magura/creative_solutions.htm
> >
> > Can someone tell me if Magura and Shimano are different mounts for
> > instance ?

>
> Think Magura uses the international standard, same as Shimano. It was Hayes
> who had their own for a while.
>
> However, unless you really want an engineering project, I think a new frame
> is a simpler and cheaper option. Some quite nice MTB hard-tail frames are
> around £225-£300. Obviously depends if your forks and other parts are 100%
> transferable.
>
>
> I've had a think about converting my circa 2000 Orange Gringo to disks
> (dropouts are not flat, but have a "cover" above the axle nut), but decided
> its a lot easier to change the frame than sort out a retro-fit.
>
>
> If the original problems were cables icing up, then Magura hydraulic rim
> brakes for the rear might be quicker, cheaper and probably as effective in
> stopping. If the problems were garbage on the rims, then the Magura rim
> brakes are no help.
>
>
>
> - Nigel
>
>
> --
> Nigel Cliffe,
> Webmaster at http://www.2mm.org.uk/
 
R

Rob G

Guest
Rob G wrote:
> Nigel Cliffe wrote:
> > Rob G wrote:
> > > Thanks for the 2 quick inputs, guys; I've spent the afternoon doing
> > > net trawl to see what I could find.
> > >
> > > The bummer is that I don't have vertical dropout on that side of the
> > > frame so that screws the a2Z device.
> > >
> > > What I did find was this that intrigued me as I do have engineering
> > > kit and skills
> > >
> > > http://www.execulink.com/~dtierney/wmc/Magura/creative_solutions.htm
> > >
> > > Can someone tell me if Magura and Shimano are different mounts for
> > > instance ?

> >
> > Think Magura uses the international standard, same as Shimano. It was Hayes
> > who had their own for a while.
> >
> > However, unless you really want an engineering project, I think a new frame
> > is a simpler and cheaper option. Some quite nice MTB hard-tail frames are
> > around £225-£300. Obviously depends if your forks and other parts are 100%
> > transferable.
> >
> >
> > I've had a think about converting my circa 2000 Orange Gringo to disks
> > (dropouts are not flat, but have a "cover" above the axle nut), but decided
> > its a lot easier to change the frame than sort out a retro-fit.
> >
> >
> > If the original problems were cables icing up, then Magura hydraulic rim
> > brakes for the rear might be quicker, cheaper and probably as effectivein
> > stopping. If the problems were garbage on the rims, then the Magura rim
> > brakes are no help.
> >
> >
> >
> > - Nigel
> >
> >
> > --
> > Nigel Cliffe,
> > Webmaster at http://www.2mm.org.uk/


Ooops - something went wrong there !

What I was about to say when it went off and did it by itself, was
thanks Nigel - the frame change is a valid option but being retired and
only bike-active when required for going to remote hills, the option to
look at making it myself is interesting as the upgrade isn't urgent,
costs only my time, of which I now have oodddles (aren't I lucky), and
doesn't cost any major expenditure (desirable when retired!).

Cheers

Rob
 
R

Rob Morley

Guest
In article <[email protected]>
Rob G <[email protected]> wrote:
<snip>
> What I was about to say when it went off and did it by itself, was
> thanks Nigel - the frame change is a valid option but being retired and
> only bike-active when required for going to remote hills, the option to
> look at making it myself is interesting as the upgrade isn't urgent,
> costs only my time, of which I now have oodddles (aren't I lucky), and
> doesn't cost any major expenditure (desirable when retired!).
>

Looking for a hobby to wile away the hours? I'd get into metal casting
if I had enough tuits - with the right (home made) kit you can make
everything from jewellery, buckles and ornaments to machine parts, from
scrap metal, and sell them when you get good at it. Google backyard-
foundry and see what you think, especially the stuff that uses waste
vegetable oil.
 
R

Rob G

Guest
Rob Morley wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>
> Rob G <[email protected]> wrote:
> <snip>
> > What I was about to say when it went off and did it by itself, was
> > thanks Nigel - the frame change is a valid option but being retired and
> > only bike-active when required for going to remote hills, the option to
> > look at making it myself is interesting as the upgrade isn't urgent,
> > costs only my time, of which I now have oodddles (aren't I lucky), and
> > doesn't cost any major expenditure (desirable when retired!).
> >

> Looking for a hobby to wile away the hours? I'd get into metal casting
> if I had enough tuits - with the right (home made) kit you can make
> everything from jewellery, buckles and ornaments to machine parts, from
> scrap metal, and sell them when you get good at it. Google backyard-
> foundry and see what you think, especially the stuff that uses waste
> vegetable oil.


Yes I suppose I have the 'tuits' now but it's the 'when you get good at
it' bit that puts me off going down the casting route. I'm more likely
to start with some 10mm Al bar and work it from the solid on the
grounds that there won't be any cavities in it.

But I will do the google you suggest all the same !

Rob