Rear LED light effectiveness.

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by [email protected], Mar 14, 2006.

  1. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Simon Bennett wrote:
    > Dave Larrington wrote:
    >
    > > I /did/ get passed by a semi-visible Richard Phipps about 160 km into
    > > the South Bucks Winter Warmer, but some new flatteries at the next
    > > control sorted that out...

    >
    > Do his clones ever ride on the same Audaxes? Might explain the subtle
    > differences.
    >
    > I saw one on the Invicta Hilly on Sunday.


    did you see his saddle bag? it looked a bit small, I assume that's a
    Super C
     


  2. In article <[email protected]>, Simon Bennett
    ([email protected]) wrote:
    > Dave Larrington wrote:
    >
    > > I /did/ get passed by a semi-visible Richard Phipps about 160 km into
    > > the South Bucks Winter Warmer, but some new flatteries at the next
    > > control sorted that out...

    >
    > Do his clones ever ride on the same Audaxes? Might explain the subtle
    > differences.
    >
    > I saw one on the Invicta Hilly on Sunday.


    I think I saw two on the Kennett Valley Run.

    --
    Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
    All your call centre are belong to us.
     
  3. MartinM wrote:

    > did you see his saddle bag? it looked a bit small, I assume that's a
    > Super C


    A bit small for what? I didn't see it, but I know how big they are.
     
  4. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    Simon Bennett wrote:
    > MartinM wrote:
    >
    > > did you see his saddle bag? it looked a bit small, I assume that's a
    > > Super C

    >
    > Did it look like this?
    > http://www.wallbike.com/carradice/supercsaddlepack.html


    not quite it had mesh side pockets but about the same size; I prefer my
    SQR tour but it is a lot bigger (although still very light)
     
  5. MartinM wrote:
    > Simon Bennett wrote:
    >> MartinM wrote:
    >>
    >>> did you see his saddle bag? it looked a bit small, I assume that's a
    >>> Super C

    >>
    >> Did it look like this?
    >> http://www.wallbike.com/carradice/supercsaddlepack.html

    >
    > not quite it had mesh side pockets but about the same size;


    Yes, that's the one. Can't see the pockets in the pic.

    > I prefer
    > my SQR tour but it is a lot bigger (although still very light)


    You wait until it's packed full -- it'll throw you off your bike I tells ya!
     
  6. Tom Crispin

    Tom Crispin Guest

    On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 08:18 +0000 (GMT Standard Time),
    [email protected] (Terry) wrote:

    >Ah, so you know the street I'm referring to, and are thus aware that it is
    >a narrow rat-run with poor lighting, road-humps, cars parked on both
    >sides, and cars entering and crossing having limited visibility due to
    >parked cars?
    >
    >I'm so very glad that neither you nor the dick risking his kid's life is
    >my dad.


    May I suggest you don't take a trip to China. From the sound of it
    your heart would pack up in 0.0001 seconds if you saw the way people
    cycled at night in some of the cities I have visited. Sanya struck me
    as being particularly bad - but perhaps that's only because it's the
    only Chinese city (apart from Bejing) where I have cycled.

    I didn't see a single bicycle light being used and the only helmets I
    saw were worn by construction workers cycling to work. Perhaps it's
    just as well the one child per family policy is still enforced in the
    city (with an exception for a couple, both the product of the one
    child policy). I'd hate it for you to see a family of five on one
    bike, cycling at night in an unlit street covered in potholes.
    --
    Let us have a moment of silence for all Americans who
    are now stuck in traffic on their way to a health club
    to ride a stationary bicycle. -
    Congressman Earl Blumenauer (Oregon)
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, Zog The Undeniable wrote:
    >Pete Biggs wrote:
    >> Zog The Undeniable wrote:
    >>
    >>>LEDs are also generally awful when run from NiMH cells.

    >>
    >> "Nickel Metal-Hydride batteries have a high capacity and a very flat
    >> discharge curve which maintains a cell voltage of 1.2V over ~80% of the
    >> discharge curve. This gives a nominal pack voltage of 4.8V which as you
    >> can see from the graph brings the mean efficiency up toward 70% and since
    >> the fully charged voltage of the pack is only 5.6V the maximum LED power
    >> is about 1.3W for a brief period and stays at 1W for most of the discharge
    >> cycle. If you do not want to modify the light I strongly recommend you use
    >> NiMH rechargeable batteries, you will get much longer run times."
    >> - http://www.ajjrice.plus.com/reviews/smart nova.htm

    >
    >Yes, but LEDs are more voltage dependent than current dependent.


    Well, sort of, in a way, ignoring lights with proper regulation (which
    should be current regulation for LEDs, not voltage regulation).

    But while the lower internal resistance of rechargables isn't as
    significant at the typically lower current requirements of LED lights
    compared with incandescents, LEDs are more efficient at lower currents,
    so a small amount of undervolting won't reduce brightness anything like
    as much as it would for an incandescent.

    Any LED light that is ok on part-used alkalines should be fine with NiMH.
     
  8. Terry

    Terry Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Tony
    Raven) wrote:

    > Terry wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    > > (Tony Raven) wrote:
    > >
    > >> Terry wrote:
    > >>> I was horrified by the bloke cycling without lights in London the
    > >>> other night while carrying his young daughter on the crossbar. It

    > > was >>a cold night as well and the poor kid had no gloves.
    > >>>
    > >> Although I use lights in London to be honest they are not critical
    > >> unless it is raining. Street lighting is very good and visibility

    > > of >cyclists is not a problem in general.
    > >
    > > Ah, so you know the street I'm referring to, and are thus aware that
    > > it is a narrow rat-run with poor lighting, road-humps, cars parked on
    > > both sides, and cars entering and crossing having limited visibility
    > > due to parked cars? > > I'm so very glad that neither you nor the
    > > > > dick risking his kid's life is my dad.

    > >

    >
    > Which part of "in general" did you not understand?


    Given that you wrote it, which part of "they are not critical unless it is
    raining" did /you/ not understand.

    I didn't make a general point. I made a specific point about a specific
    incident in which a specific person did a very foolish thing in a specific
    location which caused it also to be very dangerous. Had it been two lads
    larking about I wouldn't have mentioned it, but a small child is entitled
    to expect better, both of its carers and of other adults who might, for
    whatever reason, choose to gloss over criminal stupidity with glib
    generalisations.
     
  9. Terry

    Terry Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected]e (Tom Crispin) wrote:

    > On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 08:18 +0000 (GMT Standard Time),
    > [email protected] (Terry) wrote:
    >
    > >Ah, so you know the street I'm referring to, and are thus aware that

    > it is >a narrow rat-run with poor lighting, road-humps, cars parked on
    > both >sides, and cars entering and crossing having limited visibility
    > due to >parked cars? >
    > >I'm so very glad that neither you nor the dick risking his kid's life

    > is >my dad.
    >
    > May I suggest you don't take a trip to China. From the sound of it
    > your heart would pack up in 0.0001 seconds if you saw the way people
    > cycled at night in some of the cities I have visited. Sanya struck me
    > as being particularly bad - but perhaps that's only because it's the
    > only Chinese city (apart from Bejing) where I have cycled.
    >
    > I didn't see a single bicycle light being used and the only helmets I
    > saw were worn by construction workers cycling to work. Perhaps it's
    > just as well the one child per family policy is still enforced in the
    > city (with an exception for a couple, both the product of the one
    > child policy). I'd hate it for you to see a family of five on one
    > bike, cycling at night in an unlit street covered in potholes.


    Presumably, if you went to rural China you wouldn't defecate becaise they
    don't have flush loos? You are comparing apples and oranges.
     
  10. Terry

    Terry Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (chris harrison) wrote:

    > Tony Raven wrote:
    > > Terry wrote:
    > >
    > >>
    > >> I was horrified by the bloke cycling without lights in London the
    > >> other night while carrying his young daughter on the crossbar. It

    > > was >a cold night as well and the poor kid had no gloves.
    > >>

    > >
    > > Although I use lights in London to be honest they are not critical
    > > unless it is raining. Street lighting is very good and visibility of
    > > cyclists is not a problem in general.
    > >

    >
    > Generally I would agree - similarly, in most of urban London car
    > drivers can probably get away without lights after dark, too - at least
    > in terms of lights as aids to seeing.
    >
    > But lights - any lights - really do aid you *being* seen. Bright is
    > better than dim, but some is a lot better than none.


    I didn't even see the kid until I got close up to the unlit rider. From
    the rear he would look just like a witless fool, ripe for Carl Baxter and
    his ilk to jostle 'for a laugh'.
     
  11. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Terry wrote:
    >
    > I didn't make a general point. I made a specific point about a specific
    > incident in which a specific person did a very foolish thing in a specific
    > location which caused it also to be very dangerous. Had it been two lads
    > larking about I wouldn't have mentioned it, but a small child is entitled
    > to expect better, both of its carers and of other adults who might, for
    > whatever reason, choose to gloss over criminal stupidity with glib
    > generalisations.
    >


    Perhaps it might surprise you to know that not only is cycling extremely
    safe - safer than walking - but it is no more dangerous to cycle at
    night than in the daytime despite the large number of cyclists that
    cycle at night without lights - although I am not one of them. So as I
    said they are not critical.

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  12. Terry

    Terry Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Tony
    Raven) wrote:

    > Terry wrote:
    > >
    > > I didn't make a general point. I made a specific point about a
    > > specific incident in which a specific person did a very foolish thing
    > > in a specific location which caused it also to be very dangerous. Had
    > > it been two lads larking about I wouldn't have mentioned it, but a
    > > small child is entitled to expect better, both of its carers and of
    > > other adults who might, for whatever reason, choose to gloss over
    > > criminal stupidity with glib generalisations.
    > >

    >
    > Perhaps it might surprise you to know that not only is cycling
    > extremely safe - safer than walking - but it is no more dangerous to
    > cycle at night than in the daytime despite the large number of cyclists
    > that cycle at night without lights - although I am not one of them. So
    > as I said they are not critical.



    Which part of "gloss over criminal stupidity with glib generalisations" do
    you need help to understand?
     
  13. Tom Crispin

    Tom Crispin Guest

    On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 19:05 +0000 (GMT Standard Time),
    [email protected] (Terry) wrote:

    >Presumably, if you went to rural China you wouldn't defecate becaise they
    >don't have flush loos? You are comparing apples and oranges.


    There was a sign, which my brother translated, next to one rural
    Chinese loo. It said, "It is an offense to steal the people's
    fertiliser." I felt that anyone who chose to steal my deposit from
    the cesspit into which I dumped it from a hole directly above, would
    be quite welcome to it.

    I you consider the value of a Chinese child to be the same as a
    European child, you would have an equal concern for the safety of both
    races. Apples and oranges it is not, provided you value both equally.
    --
    Let us have a moment of silence for all Americans who
    are now stuck in traffic on their way to a health club
    to ride a stationary bicycle. -
    Congressman Earl Blumenauer (Oregon)
     
  14. > May I suggest you don't take a trip to China. From the sound of it
    > your heart would pack up in 0.0001 seconds if you saw the way people
    > cycled at night in some of the cities I have visited


    I expect they have a much higher accident rate to go with it too.

    The OP does seem to be frothing at the mouth rather too much - no lights
    and a sprog on the crossbar doesn't strike me as particularly dangerous,
    but is certainly Very Naughty and as such shouldn't be done. Still,
    cycling at speed with no lights is just asking for a smidsy.
     
  15. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "Eatmorepies" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    >
    > I've been horrified by dim cyclists whilst driving as well.
    >
    > At night I wear a yellow hi-vis altura coat.
    > I use a 2002 Halfords LED rear on continuous, it has a large surface area
    > and can be seen from afar.
    > I put new batteries in it before it gets dim. 1 pint = 2 sets of super
    > duper batteries.
    >
    > Stealth cycling needs to end.
    >
    > John



    Yet I can (and do) go out well lit, covered in fluorescent or bright yellow,
    and reflectives... and still be, apparently, invisible to motorists.

    Today I had five rear lights *on*, three front lights on, large areas of
    reflectives and wearing *bright* yellow and reflective/fluorescent tape in
    vast qantities... and still I had a motorist almost run into the back of me
    and when it decided to overtake, it did so with millimetres of gap between
    me and the vehicle.

    Cheers, helen s
     
  16. > Today I had five rear lights *on*, three front lights on, large areas
    > of reflectives and wearing *bright* yellow and reflective/fluorescent
    > tape in vast qantities... and still I had a motorist almost run into
    > the back of me and when it decided to overtake, it did so with
    > millimetres of gap between me and the vehicle.


    I'd suggest that he *had* seen you..
     
  17. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "Mark Thompson"
    <[email protected]*_turn_up_the_heat_to_reply*.com> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    >> Today I had five rear lights *on*, three front lights on, large areas
    >> of reflectives and wearing *bright* yellow and reflective/fluorescent
    >> tape in vast qantities... and still I had a motorist almost run into
    >> the back of me and when it decided to overtake, it did so with
    >> millimetres of gap between me and the vehicle.

    >
    > I'd suggest that he *had* seen you..


    Well there is that :-(

    Mind you, on the positive side, I had the usual waves and smiles from the
    HGV drivers en route to and from the local quarry :)

    Cheers, helen s
     
  18. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    wafflycat wrote:
    >
    > Today I had five rear lights *on*, three front lights on, large areas
    > of reflectives and wearing *bright* yellow and reflective/fluorescent
    > tape in vast qantities... and still I had a motorist almost run into the
    > back of me and when it decided to overtake, it did so with millimetres
    > of gap between me and the vehicle.
    >


    Moths to the light?

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  19. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    Terry wrote:
    > I didn't make a general point. I made a specific point about a specific
    > incident in which a specific person did a very foolish thing in a specific
    > location which caused it also to be very dangerous. Had it been two lads
    > larking about I wouldn't have mentioned it, but a small child is entitled
    > to expect better, both of its carers and of other adults who might, for
    > whatever reason, choose to gloss over criminal stupidity with glib
    > generalisations.


    My son goes to Boys Brigade on a Wednesday night.
    I generally take him there on Igor (the tandem.)
    A small number of other parents also travel by bike, and the elder
    brother of one of the boys.

    I (as one would expect) have front and rear lights, plus lots of
    reflective tape of various colours, and both wheel and handlebar end
    flashy things.

    One of the other parents wears a hi-vis construction jacket, rides a
    MTB and has minimal LED lights front and rear. Walks his son home.
    One other parent, who I am led to believe cycles because his car
    license is currently suspended, rides a BMX, no lights. Takes his son
    home standing on the rear stunt pegs.
    The other lad who has occasionally turned up on his bike has no lights
    and no brakes. Doesn't seem to think this is a problem.

    Strangely enough I expect them all to survive.

    BTW the helmet count is close to zero - my son wears one when he wants
    to. It is up to him.

    ...d
     
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