Rear Mirror...what is the prefered placement?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Shipwreck, Jun 16, 2003.

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  1. Shipwreck

    Shipwreck Guest

    In the busy traffic, I need to get a rear mirror. I see there are those that attach to the
    helmet and of course the handlebar. does one work (or feel) better than another? I assume the
    helmet version offers a smaller diameter mirror, but has advantages like breakage when handling
    the bike (?)

    Thanks,

    Gary
     
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  2. Robin

    Robin Guest

    shipwreck wrote:
    > In the busy traffic, I need to get a rear mirror. I see there are those that attach to the
    > helmet and of course the handlebar. does one work (or feel) better than another? I assume the
    > helmet version offers a smaller diameter mirror, but has advantages like breakage when handling
    > the bike (?)
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Gary

    I think this is a matter of preference. I tried helmet mirrors and cannot get used to them. I prefer
    a handlebar mirror but you will find many riders with the opposite preference. You should be
    prepared to try both which might mean buying both. Note that a handlebar mirror can be obscured by
    your arm in certain riding positions.

    Robin
     
  3. On Mon, 16 Jun 2003 22:28:40 +0000, shipwreck wrote:

    > In the busy traffic, I need to get a rear mirror. I see there are those that attach to the
    > helmet and of course the handlebar. does one work (or feel) better than another? I assume the
    > helmet version offers a smaller diameter mirror, but has advantages like breakage when handling
    > the bike (?)
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Gary
    I've got a mirror that goes on my glasses. Took about a month to get used to , now I wouldn't ride
    without it.
     
  4. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > In the busy traffic, I need to get a rear mirror. I see there are those that attach to the
    > helmet and of course the handlebar. does one work (or feel) better than another? I assume the
    > helmet version offers a smaller diameter mirror, but has advantages like breakage when handling
    > the bike (?)

    I like the bar-end mounted mirror, but ymmv.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  5. On Mon, 16 Jun 2003 22:28:40 +0000, shipwreck wrote:

    > In the busy traffic, I need to get a rear mirror. I see there are those that attach to the
    > helmet and of course the handlebar. does one work (or feel) better than another? I assume the
    > helmet version offers a smaller diameter mirror, but has advantages like breakage when handling
    > the bike (?)

    I never have felt the need for a mirror. Yes, I ride in traffic (Philadelphia). Even if you do get a
    mirror, it is important to check behind you by turning your head. That way, you not only catch what
    you miss in the mirror, but drivers see that you are looking. My experience has been that that has a
    great influence on drivers.

    I have done experiments. Riding without looking back, drivers seem to pass closer to me. When I look
    back, they give me more room. I think having the cyclist look at the driver makes the cyclist more
    human, rather than just an annoyance, to the driver.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. _`\(,_ | That is easy. All
    you have to do is tell them they are being (_)/ (_) | attacked, and denounce the peacemakers for
    lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any <country. --
    Hermann Goering
     
  6. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Mon, 16 Jun 2003 22:28:40 GMT, <[email protected]>, shipwreck
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In the busy traffic, I need to get a rear mirror. I see there are those that attach to the
    >helmet and of course the handlebar. does one work (or feel) better than another? I assume the
    >helmet version offers a smaller diameter mirror, but has advantages like breakage when handling
    >the bike (?)
    >
    >Thanks,
    >
    >Gary

    I tried a helmet mounted mirror and found it easy to get accustomed too. I don't coddle my helmet so
    found it impractical for my type of utility riding where the mutt stays in the weather with the bike
    subjecting the mirror to theft and regular bounces. I found that my ears give me about as much
    useful information as a mirror without adding distractions.
    --
    zk
     
  7. "David L. Johnson" wrote:

    > I have done experiments. Riding without looking back, drivers seem to pass closer to me. When I
    > look back, they give me more room. I think having the cyclist look at the driver makes the cyclist
    > more human, rather than just an annoyance, to the driver.
    >

    That makes sense, but as a newbie I find myself losing balance if I stop looking into the middle
    distance for so much as a second. I hope the ability to look will come with practise! The ability to
    steer and start would be helpful too.

    No wonder I'm nervous about going on the road.

    EFR in Paris
     
  8. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "shipwreck" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...
    > In the busy traffic, I need to get a rear mirror. I see there are those that attach to the
    > helmet and of course the handlebar. does one work (or feel) better than another? I assume the
    > helmet version offers a smaller diameter mirror, but has advantages like breakage when handling
    > the bike (?)

    I prefer mirrors on the helmet or glasses. I find them indispensable in traffic, as I can check
    quickly during frequent merges. Some people have problems if their wrong eye is very dominant.
     
  9. Matt Hiller

    Matt Hiller Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, shipwreck wrote:
    > In the busy traffic, I need to get a rear mirror. I see there are those that attach to the
    > helmet and of course the handlebar. does one work (or feel) better than another? I assume the
    > helmet version offers a smaller diameter mirror, but has advantages like breakage when handling
    > the bike (?)

    I've tried both bar-end and helmet-mounted. I like my helmet-mounted mirror (A Third Eye Reflex
    mirror, IIRC) a lot better than the bar-end mirror (Mountain Mirrycle):

    * I can scan more of the area behind me with the mirror by moving my head back and forth.

    * The initial adjustment of the barend mirror was really finicky; since my head isn't fixed, the
    helmet mirror is less finicky.

    * The mirrycle is convex (as are most bar-end mirrors, I think); this distorts your view of what
    you're seeing. The Reflex is flat (as are most helmet and eyeglass mirrors, I think).

    * I managed to break the mirror-piece on the mirrycle twice; one in a diverted-wheel crash, the
    other from a zero-speed-getting-used-to-clipless-pedals fall. I couldn't find a shop that stocks
    just the mirror-piece, though; I had to order replacements from the company. (OTOH, I'll probably
    face a similar problem if I want to move the Reflex to another helmet; see below.)

    * The helmet mirror follows me onto whatever bike I'm riding that day, so long as I'm using my
    own helmet.

    An added bonus -- the Reflex mirror attaches to a nubby mount on the helmet, and the nubby mount
    attaches to the helmet with a strong adhesive. If I want to leave the helmet parked with the bike
    but I'm paranoid about having the mirror stolen off, I can pop it off and leave just the basically
    unstealable mount in place. I'd probably have to order another mount to set up another helmet with
    the Reflex, though.

    Reiterating what other posters have said, though -- don't rely on the mirror. It's useful for
    getting quick positives on traffic behind you -- if you see something, it's there -- but not
    negatives, as there may be hazards that the mirror doesn't show! Hold your line until you've done a
    full shoulder-check.
     
  10. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > In article <[email protected]>, shipwreck wrote:
    > > In the busy traffic, I need to get a rear mirror. I see there are those that attach to the
    > > helmet and of course the handlebar. does one work (or feel) better than another? I assume the
    > > helmet version offers a smaller diameter mirror, but has advantages like breakage when handling
    > > the bike (?)
    >
    > I've tried both bar-end and helmet-mounted. I like my helmet-mounted mirror (A Third Eye Reflex
    > mirror, IIRC) a lot better than the bar-end mirror (Mountain Mirrycle):
    >
    > * I can scan more of the area behind me with the mirror by moving my head back and forth.
    >
    > * The initial adjustment of the barend mirror was really finicky; since my head isn't fixed, the
    > helmet mirror is less finicky.
    >
    > * The mirrycle is convex (as are most bar-end mirrors, I think); this distorts your view of what
    > you're seeing. The Reflex is flat (as are most helmet and eyeglass mirrors, I think).

    My Rhode Gear bar-end mirror isn't convex, but that's only a sample of one. It's big enough that I
    can ride on either the hoods or the drops without readjusting it while riding, but if I sit up more
    and put my hands on the top bars I need to move it a bit. It's easily done, though, and stays in
    place well.

    ...

    > * The helmet mirror follows me onto whatever bike I'm riding that day, so long as I'm using my own
    > helmet.

    Definitely a consideration if you have multiple bikes (which I don't).

    ...

    > Reiterating what other posters have said, though -- don't rely on the mirror. It's useful for
    > getting quick positives on traffic behind you -- if you see something, it's there -- but not
    > negatives, as there may be hazards that the mirror doesn't show! Hold your line until you've done
    > a full shoulder-check.

    Definitely true, no matter what style mirror you use.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  11. Jacques

    Jacques Guest

    On Mon, 16 Jun 2003 22:28:40 +0000, shipwreck wrote:

    > In the busy traffic, I need to get a rear mirror. I see there are those that attach to the
    > helmet and of course the handlebar. does one work (or feel) better than another? I assume the
    > helmet version offers a smaller diameter mirror, but has advantages like breakage when handling
    > the bike (?)
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Gary

    I've tried a fancy mini-mirror at the end of the handlebar, but quickly gave up as it was far too
    small to see anything useful. I've also used a big motorbike mirror attached to the left "horn" at
    the end of my handlebar. Great view, but quite heavy. As it was protruding quite a lot to the left,
    I couldn't pass lines of stopped cars that easily.

    Jacques
     
  12. shipwreck <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > In the busy traffic, I need to get a rear mirror. I see there are those that attach to the
    > helmet and of course the handlebar. does one work (or feel) better than another? I assume the
    > helmet version offers a smaller diameter mirror, but has advantages like breakage when handling
    > the bike (?)
    >

    I use the Third-Eye Pro helmet mirror mounted on the inside of my helmet. It took a few weeks to get
    used to and even longer to learn how to quickly position it correctly at the beginning of a ride but
    it was worth it, IMO. I ride a road bike and, although it took a while to get the position right, I
    now can use it equally well when riding in the drops or up on the brake hoods.

    Tom
     
  13. On Tue, 17 Jun 2003 10:39:55 +0200, Elisa Francesca Roselli wrote:

    >
    >
    > "David L. Johnson" wrote:
    >
    >> I have done experiments. Riding without looking back, drivers seem to pass closer to me. When I
    >> look back, they give me more room. I think having the cyclist look at the driver makes the
    >> cyclist more human, rather than just an annoyance, to the driver.
    >>
    >
    > That makes sense, but as a newbie I find myself losing balance if I stop looking into the middle
    > distance for so much as a second. I hope the ability to look will come with practise! The ability
    > to steer and start would be helpful too.

    Even making a feint at looking back is helpful. It doesn't matter if you don't see anything (well,
    seeing is better, but being visible is what I am afer), if you look back you become a person.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | You will say Christ saith this and the apostles say this; but _`\(,_ | what canst thou say?
    -- George Fox. (_)/ (_) |
     
  14. >That makes sense, but as a newbie I find myself losing balance if I stop looking into the middle
    >distance for so much as a second. I hope the ability to look will come with practise! The ability
    >to steer and start would be helpful too.

    If you keep doing it you will get good at it. I'd say forget the mirror for now and concentrate on
    holding a straight line. Not a line on the street necessarily, a line in your mind. Play connect the
    dots where you are at point A and you are going to point B.

    Imagine the desirability of point B and how good it is to get there.

    Everything else is an elaboration on this. That you intend to reach your objective on a bicycle and
    defining that objective is strategy.

    Everything else is tactics.

    Try breaking a ride up into smaller bits, where you focus on doing each bit as it arises. A regular
    route helps. For example, you could define a starting point as "I check my bicycle brakes and tire
    pressure before I ride."

    Later you can learn how to make this more meaningful.

    Another bit might be, "As I approach the intersection of Main and Smudge I always check six prior to
    the known utility trench generated pothole before I merge into the center lane on Main."

    The point is that individual maneuver skills are just building blocks, tactics so to speak, that you
    can assemble to provide an objective oriented approach to your overall strategy of reaching point B.

    Anybody can do this. Effective Cycling is a very, very good starting point towards building good
    road habits. It definitely teaches one what the envelope is for safe operation.

    When you can put the bits together so it is completely seamless, and above all know why you are
    doing it, you are going to be amazed at how many clueless riders there are out there.

    And you'll get to experience Nirvana? Probably not. But you will experience point B, and far
    more often.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
    the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  15. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "jacques" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:p[email protected]...
    > I've tried a fancy mini-mirror at the end of the handlebar, but quickly gave up as it was far too
    > small to see anything useful. I've also used a big motorbike mirror attached to the left "horn" at
    > the end of my handlebar. Great view, but quite heavy. As it was protruding quite a lot to the
    > left, I couldn't pass lines of stopped cars that easily.

    The closer the mirror is to the eye, the smaller it can be. The very smallest actually mount to
    the inside surface of your glasses. Since I wear corrective lenses, that wouldn't work for me.
    Mounting the mirror just outside the glasses allows the smallest, lightest, mirror, with good
    field of view, for
    me.
     
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