Rear pannier rack for rear suspension MTB

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Julian Fox, Sep 7, 2003.

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  1. Julian Fox

    Julian Fox Guest

    I am going off road touring with panniers and my full sus bike. I bought a seat post mount Raleigh
    pannier rack and rode it to test ( loaded up with only 7kg ). What a disaster, the rack waggled from
    side to side (the rubber pads moved in the clamp ) and the panniers rack rails flexed so much on
    hitting a big bump that the pannier mounting brackets touched the rear wheel. I did take great care
    to fit it well and to tightly attach.

    I cannot believe that a solid rack does not exist, after all think of the punishment a saddle gets
    and it is mounted to the frame in a similar manner.

    Has anyone had success with any design or is there any helpful advice?

    Thanks, Julian
     
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  2. Jsntg

    Jsntg Guest

  3. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    "Julian Fox" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am going off road touring with panniers and my full sus bike. I bought
    a
    > seat post mount Raleigh pannier rack and rode it to test ( loaded up with only 7kg ). What a
    > disaster, the rack waggled from side to side (the
    rubber
    > pads moved in the clamp ) and the panniers rack rails flexed so much on hitting a big bump that
    > the pannier mounting brackets touched the rear wheel. I did take great care to fit it well and to
    > tightly attach.

    There are better seatpost mounted racks out there (Delta, Performance, Headland); but even the good
    ones are mounted too high, IMO. All of these have a beefy clamp and oversized aluminum boom. You'll
    probably want to get a heavy-duty seatpost, too. I don't know if I'd trust an ultralight seatpost
    with my weight, plus 30 lbs of cargo cantilevered out 2 ft, being bumped and yanked around for hours
    and hours every day. That's a lot of stress on a seatpost.

    > I cannot believe that a solid rack does not exist, after all think of the punishment a saddle gets
    > and it is mounted to the frame in a similar
    manner.

    There are some excellent racks designed for full-suspension bikes and other bikes that lack
    rack/fender eyelets (including road bikes and some recumbents). The Old Man Mountain Cold Springs
    rear rack is the best design that I've seen:

    http://www.oldmanmountain.com/cold_springs_rear_details.htm

    > Has anyone had success with any design or is there any helpful advice?

    I've never tried the OMM racks; but they appear to be just what the doctor ordered. They work with
    disc, v-brakes or cantilever brakes. OMM sells a matching front cargo rack designed for use with
    suspension forks. All of the Cold Springs and Sherpa models attach at the wheel dropouts, inline
    with the axle ends, using an extra long skewer (supplied with the rack). The rack is stabilized with
    adjustable stainless steel arms that attach to the V-brake or cantilever brake studs.

    Let us know how you end up solving your problem, and post some photos of your touring rig to a
    website somewhere so we can check it out.

    -=Barry=-
     
  4. Pete Jones

    Pete Jones Guest

    On Sun, 7 Sep 2003 17:19:24 +0000 (UTC), "Julian Fox" <[email protected]>
    blathered:

    >I am going off road touring with panniers and my full sus bike. I bought a seat post mount Raleigh
    >pannier rack and rode it to test ( loaded up with only 7kg ). What a disaster, the rack waggled
    >from side to side (the rubber pads moved in the clamp ) and the panniers rack rails flexed so much
    >on hitting a big bump that the pannier mounting brackets touched the rear wheel. I did take great
    >care to fit it well and to tightly attach.
    >
    >I cannot believe that a solid rack does not exist, after all think of the punishment a saddle gets
    >and it is mounted to the frame in a similar manner.
    >
    >Has anyone had success with any design or is there any helpful advice?

    http://www.oldmanmountain.com/

    http://www.bobtrailers.com/

    Pete
    ----
    http://www.btinternet.com/~peteajones/
     
  5. Julian Fox

    Julian Fox Guest

    Thanks for the links, I had already looked at the Old Man Mountain products and I am wary that it
    may not be particularly suitable for the sort of riding I do which involves quite a lot of bouncing
    over big stones. I don't like the idea that the panniers will be adding to the unsprung weight, it
    will reduce the effectiveness of the suspension and shake the luggage a lot more but it does seem
    that it might well work.

    Julian "Pete Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 7 Sep 2003 17:19:24 +0000 (UTC), "Julian Fox" <[email protected]>
    > blathered:
    >
    > >I am going off road touring with panniers and my full sus bike. I bought
    a
    > >seat post mount Raleigh pannier rack and rode it to test ( loaded up with only 7kg ). What a
    > >disaster, the rack waggled from side to side (the
    rubber
    > >pads moved in the clamp ) and the panniers rack rails flexed so much on hitting a big bump that
    > >the pannier mounting brackets touched the rear wheel. I did take great care to fit it well and to
    > >tightly attach.
    > >
    > >I cannot believe that a solid rack does not exist, after all think of the punishment a saddle
    > >gets and it is mounted to the frame in a similar
    manner.
    > >
    > >Has anyone had success with any design or is there any helpful advice?
    >
    > http://www.oldmanmountain.com/
    >
    > http://www.bobtrailers.com/
    >
    >
    >
    > Pete
    > ----
    > http://www.btinternet.com/~peteajones/
     
  6. Pete Jones

    Pete Jones Guest

    On Sun, 7 Sep 2003 19:56:29 +0000 (UTC), "Julian Fox" <[email protected]>
    blathered:

    >Thanks for the links, I had already looked at the Old Man Mountain products and I am wary that it
    >may not be particularly suitable for the sort of riding I do which involves quite a lot of bouncing
    >over big stones. I don't like the idea that the panniers will be adding to the unsprung weight

    Under the circumstances I'd say it's the frame that's unsuitable rather than the rack. In your
    position I'd be looking at getting a hardtail frame and a good steel pannier rack such as a
    Tubus Cargo.

    Pete
    ----
    http://www.btinternet.com/~peteajones/
     
  7. Julian Fox

    Julian Fox Guest

    Well I went and bought a Delta rack and binned the old one. A huge difference. It clamps directly to
    the seat post with no rubber. Just did a 30 mile xc ride fully laden and no problems. The side
    supports wag a bit and should be reinforced a little more in my view but it is acceptable with a
    light pack load. The flex of the main rack beam and of the clamp is negligible. So this is the way I
    will go on my tour. Lets hope it stands up to a prolonged hammer.

    Julian "Pete Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 7 Sep 2003 19:56:29 +0000 (UTC), "Julian Fox" <[email protected]>
    > blathered:
    >
    > >Thanks for the links, I had already looked at the Old Man Mountain
    products
    > >and I am wary that it may not be particularly suitable for the sort of riding I do which involves
    > >quite a lot of bouncing over big stones. I
    don't
    > >like the idea that the panniers will be adding to the unsprung weight
    >
    > Under the circumstances I'd say it's the frame that's unsuitable rather than the rack. In your
    > position I'd be looking at getting a hardtail frame and a good steel pannier rack such as a
    > Tubus Cargo.
    >
    > Pete
    > ----
    > http://www.btinternet.com/~peteajones/
     
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