Rear racks on a racer ?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by John Scott, Mar 24, 2003.

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  1. John Scott

    John Scott Guest

    I bought a "nearly" new Trek 1200 road bike 2003 model bike, Aluminium, Tiagra gears, brakes
    and hubs, triple suntour crank set, carbon forks, Alex rim wheels, 23cm specialized armadillo
    turbo tyres.

    Now I have been going out with the local CTC and in the summer they tend to carry food as well as
    waterproofs in paniers, There is braze ons to attatch a rear rack on the back of this bike, I was
    wondering if anyone had any idea how much load I could carry on the back ? I do have another
    "summer" racing bike so I am prepared to weigh this bike down with racks and paniers, I'm just not
    sure if the rear wheels will handle it.

    This is the drop handlebar version, the flat handlebar version is reviewed in this month's cycling
    plus. I have actually put "over the brake" salmon narrow mudguards on it already. And I have been on
    some 60 mile + rides on it already.

    Oh and if anyone can recommend a reasonably light rear rack, that would be good.

    Thanks, John
     
    Tags:


  2. You could carry a good lot on any bike. 20 lb anyway.
     
  3. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "John Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I bought a "nearly" new Trek 1200 road bike 2003 model bike, Aluminium, Tiagra gears, brakes and
    > hubs, triple suntour crank set, carbon forks,
    Alex
    > rim wheels, 23cm specialized armadillo turbo tyres.
    >
    > Now I have been going out with the local CTC and in the summer they tend
    to
    > carry food as well as waterproofs in paniers, There is braze ons to
    attatch
    > a rear rack on the back of this bike, I was wondering if anyone had any
    idea
    > how much load I could carry on the back ? I do have another "summer"
    racing
    > bike so I am prepared to weigh this bike down with racks and paniers, I'm just not sure if the
    > rear wheels will handle it.
    >
    > This is the drop handlebar version, the flat handlebar version is reviewed in this month's cycling
    > plus. I have actually put "over the brake" salmon narrow mudguards on it already. And I have been
    > on some 60 mile + rides on it already.
    >
    > Oh and if anyone can recommend a reasonably light rear rack, that would be good.
    >
    > Thanks, John
    >
    >
    >
    I'm 600 miles through a 850 or so mile from John O' Groats to Lands End and have been using a snazzy
    'Beto', slot over the seat post / quick release rack that's got a built in elastic securing device.
    It's from my local french Decathlon superstore and cost about a tenner. I'm incredibly impressed
    with it. It recommends a max weight of 20lbs or 9kg but I have been carrying well in excess, camping
    gear, spare clothes, shoes, tools, toiletries and probably the kitchen sink ;-). The only worrying
    thing is that there are no down posts to secure it to the frame of thebike, but it does have the
    added advantage of being able to swap between bikes in 5 mins. Unless you're carrying excessive
    weights can't see this being a problem. Cheers, Dave.
     
  4. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    John Scott <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Now I have been going out with the local CTC and in the summer they tend to carry food as well as
    > waterproofs in paniers, There is braze ons to attatch a rear rack on the back of this bike, I was
    > wondering if anyone had any idea how much load I could carry on the back ? I do have another
    > "summer" racing bike so I am prepared to weigh this bike down with racks and paniers, I'm just not
    > sure if the rear wheels will handle it.
    >

    How much do you weigh and how much do you think the heaviest person who might ride one weighs? You
    can carry the difference in weight as luggage without problems for the bike although I suspect you
    might not want to pedal it up the hills. As for the wheels, provided they have been properly
    tensioned they will carry more weight than you will want to pedal.

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "I don't want any yes-men around me. I want everybody to tell me the truth even if it costs them
    their job."

    Samuel Goldwyn
     
  5. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    John Scott <[email protected]> wrote:

    : Now I have been going out with the local CTC and in the summer they tend to carry food as well as
    : waterproofs in paniers

    For my taste the answer is to just carry less. A waterproof should fit in a back pocket, along with
    a few ceral bars. A small underseat bag can carry tools/tubes etc.

    After all, you'll be stopping at a cafe for elevenses, lunch and tea :)

    If your waterproof won't fit in a pocket, then a good solution for light day rides on a back with no
    rack fittings is to use a seatpost mounted rack (like this:
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/product_detail.asp?ProdID=5300003208 ) with a small rackpack (like this:
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/product_detail.asp?ProdID=5300001455).

    Just remember to keep the weight you carry in such a system light.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org Power is delightful. Absolute power is absolutely delightful -
    Lord Lester
     
  6. Bryan

    Bryan Guest

    <snip>
    > > Now I have been going out with the local CTC and in the summer they tend
    > to
    > > carry food as well as waterproofs in paniers, There is braze ons to
    > attatch
    > > a rear rack on the back of this bike, I was wondering if anyone had any
    > idea
    > > how much load I could carry on the back ? I do have another "summer"
    > racing
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > I'm 600 miles through a 850 or so mile from John O' Groats to Lands End and have been using a
    > snazzy 'Beto', slot over the seat post / quick release rack that's got a built in elastic securing
    > device. It's from my local french Decathlon superstore and cost about a tenner. I'm incredibly
    > impressed with it. It recommends a max weight of 20lbs or 9kg but I have been carrying well in
    > excess, camping gear, spare clothes, shoes, tools, toiletries and probably the kitchen sink ;-).
    > The only worrying thing is that there are no down posts to secure it to the frame of thebike, but
    > it does have the added advantage of being able to swap between bikes in 5 mins. Unless you're
    > carrying excessive weights can't see this being a problem. Cheers, Dave.

    Good lick Dave, at least the weathers with you at the moment.

    John, how much food do intend carrying with you for a day ride? few bananas, sarnies, flapjack
    etc shouldn't weigh that much anyway (even me being lardy can't eat a full panniers worth of
    food in a day)

    Bryan
     
  7. W K

    W K Guest

    "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]

    > How much do you weigh and how much do you think the heaviest person who might ride one weighs? You
    > can carry the difference in weight as luggage without problems for the bike

    I'd wonder about that you know. luggage has less suspension than a body, and you might have bigger
    shock loads, on specific parts of the frame where its attatched.

    OTOH don't know if thats enough to make a difference.
     
  8. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    W K <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >
    >> How much do you weigh and how much do you think the heaviest person who might ride one weighs?
    >> You can carry the difference in weight as luggage without problems for the bike
    >
    > I'd wonder about that you know. luggage has less suspension than a body, and you might have bigger
    > shock loads, on specific parts of the frame where its attatched.
    >
    > OTOH don't know if thats enough to make a difference.

    I suspect when you hit a bump your body moves less and puts more transient load on the saddle than
    the panniers do on the rack

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "I don't want any yes-men around me. I want everybody to tell me the truth even if it costs them
    their job."

    Samuel Goldwyn
     
  9. Markk

    Markk Guest

    "John Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Oh and if anyone can recommend a reasonably light rear rack, that would be good.

    I just got a TorTec Tourlite for 24.99 from Wiggle for my Dawes Audax.
    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/product_detail.asp?ProdID=5300003806 It's strong, takes 25kg (55lb), weighs
    only 550g, has a Cateye rear mount which takes my AU100 nicely, is well made and looks good. I can
    recommend it, though as others have said, you don't necessarily need a rack.

    MarkK
     
  10. John Scott

    John Scott Guest

    I know I just mentioned food, waterproofs etc, but I can see me carrying camping stuff eventually, I
    was just wondering why most tourer bikes are not Aluminium but steel and they do have broader
    wheels. I just wonder how much my bike could carry ? I did think since I do have braze-ons a rack
    would be the best idea ? Oh I'm about 12 stone I think.

    Cheers, John "MarkK" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "John Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Oh and if anyone can recommend a reasonably light rear rack, that would
    be
    > > good.
    >
    > I just got a TorTec Tourlite for 24.99 from Wiggle for my Dawes Audax.
    > http://www.wiggle.co.uk/product_detail.asp?ProdID=5300003806 It's strong, takes 25kg (55lb),
    > weighs only 550g, has a Cateye rear mount which takes my AU100 nicely, is well made and looks
    > good. I can recommend it, though as others have said, you don't necessarily need a rack.
    >
    > MarkK
     
  11. John Scott

    John Scott Guest

    I know I just mentioned food, waterproofs etc, but I can see me carrying camping stuff eventually, I
    was just wondering why most tourer bikes are not Aluminium but steel and they do have broader
    wheels. I just wonder how much my bike could carry ? I did think since I do have braze-ons a rack
    would be the best idea ? Oh I'm about 12 stone I think.

    Cheers, John

    "John Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I bought a "nearly" new Trek 1200 road bike 2003 model bike, Aluminium, Tiagra gears, brakes and
    > hubs, triple suntour crank set, carbon forks,
    Alex
    > rim wheels, 23cm specialized armadillo turbo tyres.
    >
    > Now I have been going out with the local CTC and in the summer they tend
    to
    > carry food as well as waterproofs in paniers, There is braze ons to
    attatch
    > a rear rack on the back of this bike, I was wondering if anyone had any
    idea
    > how much load I could carry on the back ? I do have another "summer"
    racing
    > bike so I am prepared to weigh this bike down with racks and paniers, I'm just not sure if the
    > rear wheels will handle it.
    >
    > This is the drop handlebar version, the flat handlebar version is reviewed in this month's cycling
    > plus. I have actually put "over the brake" salmon narrow mudguards on it already. And I have been
    > on some 60 mile + rides on it already.
    >
    > Oh and if anyone can recommend a reasonably light rear rack, that would be good.
    >
    > Thanks, John
     
  12. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    John Scott <[email protected]> wrote:
    : I know I just mentioned food, waterproofs etc, but I can see me carrying camping stuff eventually,
    : I was just wondering why most tourer bikes are not Aluminium but steel and they do have broader
    : wheels. I just wonder how much my bike could carry ? I did think since I do have braze-ons a rack
    : would be the best idea ? Oh I'm about 12 stone I think.

    Ah. Bad news here I'm afraid. Your bike is very unlikely to react well to a camping load. You'll
    find that it is (probably) very unstable round corners etc. Race bikes aren't designed to have a
    large load on the rear axle.

    Why not keep this bike nice and light for fast day rides (you really don't need a rack for this) and
    get a second hand Dawes Galaxy (about 250 quid for a nice one) for the touring?

    Since it sounds like you're not planning on going camping straight away, you'd have time to save up
    some money.

    Artuhr

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org Power is delightful. Absolute power is absolutely delightful -
    Lord Lester
     
  13. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "John Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > I know I just mentioned food, waterproofs etc, but I can see me carrying camping stuff eventually,
    > I was just wondering why most tourer bikes are not Aluminium but steel and they do have broader
    > wheels. I just wonder how much my bike could carry ? I did think since I do have braze-ons a rack
    > would be the best idea ? Oh I'm about 12 stone I think.

    You should be able to get away with a rack and lightly loaded pannier although one problem you might
    have is mounting the pannier so that your heel has sufficient clearance. The geometry of your bike
    is not ideal for heavily laden touring even if you could get away with it structurally. A delight to
    ride unladen, it would be a total pig when loaded up like a pack mule.

    Steel is preferred for touring bikes as frame weight is not really an issue and it is perceived
    as giving a less harsh ride than aluminium, is more forgiving of rough treatment, and is easier
    to repair.

    --
    Dave...
     
  14. John Scott <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I know I just mentioned food, waterproofs etc, but I can see me carrying camping stuff eventually,
    > I was just wondering why most tourer bikes are
    not
    > Aluminium but steel and they do have broader wheels. I just wonder how much my bike could
    > carry ? I did think since I do have braze-ons a rack would be the best idea ? Oh I'm about 12
    > stone I think.
    >

    Touring bikes are steel mainly because its traditional. It is also what small UK builders are used
    to. There is also the oft-quoted bit about steel being repairable almost anywhere if it breaks
    whilst on tour, whilst aluminium will mostly leave you trying to find a suitable new frame. Mostly
    the only readily available frames will be racing bikes, which could cause problems for someone on a
    dead tourer, as many of the parts may need changing too. Having said that, its a pretty unlikely
    scenario, although a friend did have to get his down tube brazed back together on PBP 95.

    Wheels - 36spoke MA3 or similar will be OK for camping if properly built, avoid the lightweight
    stuff. Use tyres as wide as you can reasonably fit, and keep them hard, which will mean taking (or
    borrowing) a decent pump like a Zefal HPX. Wider tyres don't need to be quite as hard for the same
    weight (=more comfort), and also cope considerably better with the occasional rough track.

    A proper rack is better than a seatpost version even if you don't have braze-ons, but have to use
    P-clips (IMO).

    If you are limiting yourself to day-ride kit (waterproofs, tools, food, camera, spare clothes etc)
    then just about any rack will do, probably best with a rack-pack rather than a single pannier.

    If you want to carry camping kit (I have been cycle-camping with folk on racing bikes), then I would
    suggest a good-quality rack, with an emphasis on stiffness - eg Tubus Cargo. I have found that a lot
    of weight on a flimsy rack can give rise to handling problems. For camping (rather than hostels etc)
    it would also be worthwhile looking at putting some of the weight on the front, either with a
    clamp-on lowrider rack.

    FWIW, I use a Thorn Audax for almost all my riding, from club rides up to cycle camping in the Alps
    - rackpack for Audax/Club rides, front low-riders & rackpack for Hotel/Hostel tours, front & rear
    panniers for camping tours (~19-20kg AFAICR). Wheels typically XT/MA2 36h, 28/32mm Panaracer Pasela.

    Andrew
     
  15. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Andrew Sweetman <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Having said that, its a pretty unlikely scenario, although a friend did have to get his down tube
    > brazed back together on PBP 95.
    >

    There was the story of the unlucky Eugene Christophe who broke his forks while in second place on
    the 1913 Tour de France. He carried his bike 14km to a local village where he repaired it himself,
    outside assistance not being allowed. However he was penalised for receiving outside help - the
    blacksmiths boy had operated the bellows to fire the forge.

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable man persists in trying to
    adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." -- George
    Bernard Shaw
     
  16. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    John Scott wrote:
    > I know I just mentioned food, waterproofs etc, but I can see me carrying camping stuff eventually,
    > I was just wondering why most tourer bikes are not Aluminium but steel and they do have broader
    > wheels. I just wonder how much my bike could carry ? I did think since I do have braze-ons a rack
    > would be the best idea ? Oh I'm about 12 stone I think.
    >

    Sticking lots a stuff on any bike changes the handling, if its more than 20 or 30 lbs you might want
    to use some front panniers to keep the front end down, especially when your walking. If you use the
    low rider type racks it leaves the whole thing very stable.

    The wheels should stand up to it if they are well built. If you start getting broken spokes, get a
    good builder to rebuild with stainless double butted spokes, or buy Jobst Branhts book.

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
  17. Peter Storey

    Peter Storey Guest

    "John Scott" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I bought a "nearly" new Trek 1200 road bike 2003 model bike, Aluminium, Tiagra gears, brakes
    > and hubs, triple suntour crank set, carbon forks, Alex rim wheels, 23cm specialized armadillo
    > turbo tyres.
    >
    > Now I have been going out with the local CTC and in the summer they tend to carry food as well as
    > waterproofs in paniers, There is braze ons to attatch a rear rack on the back of this bike, I was
    > wondering if anyone had any idea how much load I could carry on the back ? I do have another
    > "summer" racing bike so I am prepared to weigh this bike down with racks and paniers, I'm just not
    > sure if the rear wheels will handle it.
    >
    > <SNIP>

    > Oh and if anyone can recommend a reasonably light rear rack, that would be good.

    The weights you are talking about will have absolutely no ill effect on the wheels. If they do, the
    wheels are badly built and are destined to fail anyway.

    Leaving aside jersey pockets, the lightest, simplest answer to carrying anything less than, say,
    15-18 pounds is a Carradice saddlebag, either with or without one of the various mounting gizmos. It
    places the weight exactly where the bike is designed to carry it (unlike a rack trunk and/or
    seatpost rack, and it saves you most or even all of the weight of a rear rack, depending on how much
    you feel the need to stabilize it with a "Bag Man" or similar support.

    The two negatives are some sway and the tendency of the bag to brush the backs of your thighs. Some
    people are driven crazy by either or both (but especially the latter), while others don't notice at
    all after the first 50 yards. Someone in your CTC group probably has one. You might ask to borrow it
    for an afternoon before committing.

    Peter Storey
     
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