Rear suspension on a touring bike

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.rides archive' started by Mark Weber, Jun 11, 2003.

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  1. Mark Weber

    Mark Weber Guest

    Hi everyone, In my search for a used touring bike I have found one that is almost brand new for
    about $400. The only issue I have with it is that the seller says it has a rear suspension. Is this
    something desireable on a touring bike? How reliable is something like that and would anyone have
    any qualms about taking a three week trip with a rear suspension? Is there any way to switch it out
    for fixed parts?

    Thank you, Mark Weber
     
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  2. Ny Rides

    Ny Rides Guest

    I'm not a fan of rear suspension in general. That aside, I'd say mounting a rear rack on the bike
    you're talking about might be a problem.

    --
    Low-Impact Rides In The LI/NY Area www.geocities.com/NYRides "Mark Weber" <[email protected]> wrote
    in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi everyone, In my search for a used touring bike I have found one that is almost brand new for
    > about $400. The only issue I have with it is that the seller says it has a rear suspension. Is
    > this something desireable on a touring bike? How reliable is something like that and would anyone
    > have any qualms about taking a three week trip with a rear suspension? Is there any way to switch
    > it out for fixed parts?
    >
    > Thank you, Mark Weber
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, Mark Weber <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Hi everyone, In my search for a used touring bike I have found one that is almost brand new for
    >about $400. The only issue I have with it is that the seller says it has a rear suspension. Is this
    >something desireable on a touring bike? How reliable is something like that and would anyone have
    >any qualms about taking a three week trip with a rear suspension? Is there any way to switch it out
    >for fixed parts?

    These questions depend a lot on the details - what is the bike (make/model), and what kind of
    suspension is on it? $400 is rather too cheap for a good quality suspension system and poor quality
    suspension is worse than none in terms of both reliability and function.

    You don't generally find suspension on diamond-frame touring bikes. Touring bikes generally get
    their suspension from fatter tires. But if that was my bike I wouldn't let it stop me from making a
    trip if I thought the suspension system would hold up. People do tour on recumbent bikes with rear
    suspension all the time. If I wanted rear suspension on a touring bike I would get a rigid bike and
    use a thudbuster or similar device that would not interfere with the load-carrying purpose of a
    touring bike or require me to adjust the suspension as my load changes during the trip.

    --Paul
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >Hi everyone, In my search for a used touring bike I have found one that is almost brand new for
    >about $400. The only issue I have with it is that the seller says it has a rear suspension. Is this
    >something desireable on a touring bike? How reliable is something like that and would anyone have
    >any qualms about taking a three week trip with a rear suspension? Is there any way to switch it out
    >for fixed parts?

    It might be that the bike has a suspension seatpost. Ask for a picture of the bike.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  5. [email protected] (Mark Weber) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > In my search for a used touring bike I have found one that is almost
    > brand new for about $400. The only issue I have with it is that the
    > seller says it has a rear suspension. Is this something desireable on

    If you post make / model people may be able to comment.

    The only "touring" bike I could think of with "suspension" would be a SoftRide(tm) which has the
    saddle on a rail which flexes.

    You can get a rear rack which mounts to the seatpost, for light loads.

    Still, it's something else to break, and you might find a Trek 520 or other touring bike for that
    kind of money. Or buy an ATB with no suspension, add bar extensions for extra position(s), and
    spend the money you save for nice rack, panniers, clothes, tools, etc.

    > a touring bike? How reliable is something like that and would anyone have any qualms about taking
    > a three week trip with a rear suspension? Is there any way to switch it out for fixed parts?
    >
    > Thank you, Mark Weber
     
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