rear view mirrors



wondering about the wisdom of using rear view mirrors,
especially in city traffic.
I visited a couple of bike shops here in Adelaide and the sales staff
there didn't have too much positive to say about them, although they
stocked the type that attaches to the handle bar. One shop had
stocked
the helmet type several years ago, but had discontinued them
primarily
because they shook too much to be of any use.
Rec.Bicycles has a thread dealing specifically with the helmet types
and
opinion seems to be that they are an asset.
Asset or not, I rarely see rear view mirrors on bikes here in
Adelaide.

Thanks in advance.
 
D

Donga

Guest
On Mar 26, 12:58 am, [email protected] wrote:
> wondering about the wisdom of using rear view mirrors,
> especially in city traffic.
> I visited a couple of bike shops here in Adelaide and the sales staff
> there didn't have too much positive to say about them, although they
> stocked the type that attaches to the handle bar. One shop had
> stocked
> the helmet type several years ago, but had discontinued them
> primarily
> because they shook too much to be of any use.
> Rec.Bicycles has a thread dealing specifically with the helmet types
> and
> opinion seems to be that they are an asset.
> Asset or not, I rarely see rear view mirrors on bikes here in
> Adelaide.
>
> Thanks in advance.


I've tried a bar mirror and all it does is make me move over for
traffic, which I don't want to do. I'm entitled to be in a safe part
of the road and the cars and trucks should go round me. I've got good
enough hearing and a mobile neck, so I can look backwards if I need
to. If a vehicle is going to drive into me, I don't think having a
mirror is going to change that. Most riders seem to share my disdain
of mirrors. That said, other riders swear by them - each to his own.
Perhaps try one and see if you like it.

Donga
 
Z

Zebee Johnstone

Guest
In aus.bicycle on 25 Mar 2007 07:58:30 -0700
[email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
> wondering about the wisdom of using rear view mirrors,
> especially in city traffic.


Couldn't live without mine, but then I do ride a recumbent so turning
to look is harder.

However, the mirror - a long stalked one on the handlebar - is easy to
use and shows me what I need to know while I'm still seeing everything
in front of me.

I've noticed that mirror users tend to be the people who are already
doing unconventional things cycling wise. Such as riding "odd" bikes
like folders or cargo bikes. I presume because such people have been
riding long enough to not give a damn about fashion :)

Main hassle with a mirror on an upright is, I suspect, the same as
with one on a motorcycle. WHich is how to see more than your elbows!
The long stalk on mine is the solution to that, bar end mirrors might
be the go for a flat bar.

The main advantage for a mirror is, I think, that you learn to use them
the same way a motorcyclist does - you are looking ahead but a portion
of your attention is on the vehicles coming up beside you. You don't
need to focus, you just need to be aware, and this gives you a good
picture of what's going on. When you need to change direction you do a
headcheck anyway, but the plan to move can be made with more knowledge.
Sure, you can do constant headchecks, few do...

Mirrors are cheap, and can be bought over the net. Buy and try, if it
works good oh, if it doesn't then you haven't lost much.

Zebee
 
P

Peter Miller

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> wondering about the wisdom of using rear view mirrors,
> especially in city traffic.
> I visited a couple of bike shops here in Adelaide and the sales staff
> there didn't have too much positive to say about them, although they
> stocked the type that attaches to the handle bar. One shop had
> stocked
> the helmet type several years ago, but had discontinued them
> primarily
> because they shook too much to be of any use.
> Rec.Bicycles has a thread dealing specifically with the helmet types
> and
> opinion seems to be that they are an asset.
> Asset or not, I rarely see rear view mirrors on bikes here in
> Adelaide.
>
> Thanks in advance.
>


My opinion is they are useful, but not necessary, in city traffic. Other
people's opinions may vary :)

I have had one for a few years on a mountain bike that is set up as a
commuter. While I find it useful for letting me know there is traffic behind
me, mirrors can never be depended upon to check if the road is clear. False
negatives will kill ya. Just like in a car or on a motorbike, you must still
have a look over your shoulder before shifting into another lane. So you
have to decide whether they are useful enough to keep. I have a roadbike
and a tourer with no mirrors fitted and I don't find that a disadvantage.

They do vibrate and are generally smaller than rear view mirrors on cars, so
field of view is not big.
I have not tried the helmet mounted style, so cannot comment on their
usefulness.
Best thing is to try for yourself and see if you find them useful.

Peter Miller
Newcastle
 
P

pdamm

Guest
On Mar 26, 12:58 am, [email protected] wrote:
> wondering about the wisdom of using rear view mirrors,
> especially in city traffic.
> I visited a couple of bike shops here in Adelaide and the sales staff
> there didn't have too much positive to say about them, although they
> stocked the type that attaches to the handle bar. One shop had
> stocked
> the helmet type several years ago, but had discontinued them
> primarily
> because they shook too much to be of any use.
> Rec.Bicycles has a thread dealing specifically with the helmet types
> and
> opinion seems to be that they are an asset.
> Asset or not, I rarely see rear view mirrors on bikes here in
> Adelaide.
>
> Thanks in advance.


I have the type that clips on to a pair of glasses (the brand is "Take
a Look"). I think they are great. I have tried the ones that attach
to a helmet and these ones don't bounce around anywhere near as much,
hardly at all in fact. Compared with a handlebar mounted one, having
the mirror closer to my eye means that it appears bigger so it covers
more area behind me. Also it only takes a small, quick movement of my
head to scan a wide angle behind me - you can't do that with the
mirror on the handle bar.

I mostly commute and tour on my bike and try hard to stay away from
busy roads. It is rare that a vehicle passes me without me first
seeing it and knowing how much room I will get when it passes. On a
couple of occasions I have decided to dive off onto the shoulder
because I didn't trust the room I was about to be given. In heavy
city traffic I find I can't watch all the cars coming from behind
since I have to watch where I am going but it certainly tells me a lot
about what is happening on the road and it is a lot easier than
turning my head right around. Personally I wouldn't ride without one.

Peter Damm
 
P

paulh

Guest
On Mar 26, 7:30 am, "pdamm" <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Mar 26, 12:58 am, [email protected] wrote:
>
> > wondering about the wisdom of using rear view mirrors,
> > especially in city traffic.
> > I visited a couple of bike shops here in Adelaide and the sales staff
> > there didn't have too much positive to say about them, although they
> > stocked the type that attaches to the handle bar. One shop had
> > stocked
> > the helmet type several years ago, but had discontinued them
> > primarily
> > because they shook too much to be of any use.
> > Rec.Bicycles has a thread dealing specifically with the helmet types
> > and
> > opinion seems to be that they are an asset.
> > Asset or not, I rarely see rear view mirrors on bikes here in
> > Adelaide.

>
> > Thanks in advance.

>
> I have the type that clips on to a pair of glasses (the brand is "Take
> a Look"). I think they are great. I have tried the ones that attach
> to a helmet and these ones don't bounce around anywhere near as much,
> hardly at all in fact. Compared with a handlebar mounted one, having
> the mirror closer to my eye means that it appears bigger so it covers
> more area behind me. Also it only takes a small, quick movement of my
> head to scan a wide angle behind me - you can't do that with the
> mirror on the handle bar.
>
> I mostly commute and tour on my bike and try hard to stay away from
> busy roads. It is rare that a vehicle passes me without me first
> seeing it and knowing how much room I will get when it passes. On a
> couple of occasions I have decided to dive off onto the shoulder
> because I didn't trust the room I was about to be given. In heavy
> city traffic I find I can't watch all the cars coming from behind
> since I have to watch where I am going but it certainly tells me a lot
> about what is happening on the road and it is a lot easier than
> turning my head right around. Personally I wouldn't ride without one.
>
> Peter Damm


I've also got the take a look mirror (from the US) and it is the best
I've tried. Everything that Peter said is right, but he left out the
most important bit, if I'm on a training ride and I see another bike
coming from behind who is obviously a much quicker rider, I can pull
up and pretend there is something wrong with my bike. This can happen
quite a lot.
 
R

ray

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> wondering about the wisdom of using rear view mirrors,
> especially in city traffic.
> I visited a couple of bike shops here in Adelaide and the sales staff
> there didn't have too much positive to say about them, although they
> stocked the type that attaches to the handle bar. One shop had
> stocked
> the helmet type several years ago, but had discontinued them
> primarily
> because they shook too much to be of any use.
> Rec.Bicycles has a thread dealing specifically with the helmet types
> and
> opinion seems to be that they are an asset.
> Asset or not, I rarely see rear view mirrors on bikes here in
> Adelaide.
>
> Thanks in advance.
>

The cheapest rear view mirror comes from your local dentist. Ask him for
half a dozen, he'll give them to you. On top of that, you need an
electrical connector, some glue, and an old spoke or similar piece of
rigid wire. Bend it around until you have a mounting that fits either a
pair of glasses (in my case) or onto a large clip on the helmet rim. The
aiming is important, it has to be right.
I've had mirrors of this type for 20+ years. The handlebar mounted types
can be prone to frame vibration, and also go smash if you drop the bike
on that side. The top mounted ones have the additional advantage that
you can move your head to scan the entire road. Get a mirror, whatever
type you prefer, and see stupid assholes in Urban Assault Vehicles
coming. I do.
Cheers,
Ray
 
P

Peter Signorini

Guest
"Peter Miller" wrote:

> While I find it useful for letting me know there is traffic behind me,
> mirrors can never be depended upon to check if the road is clear. False
> negatives will kill ya. Just like in a car or on a motorbike, you must
> still have a look over your shoulder before shifting into another lane.


The vaue of a mirror is not as a substitute for the all-important head check
before making a rght turn/lane change. They simply reduce the frequency of
hed checking needed, and give you much greater information about traffic and
its movements at all times.

> They do vibrate and are generally smaller than rear view mirrors on cars,
> so field of view is not big.


If it vibrates get another one. My old Rhode Gear bar end mirror is very
secure - no vibration except for on rough coutry gravel roads. Thr rubber
plug mount has vibrated out a couple of times on badly corrugated roads, but
luckily each time I've known about it quickly and got it back. As far as the
field of view is concerned, most are slightly convex to give a wider field,
not as good as a car but they are wide rectangles which you'll never compare
to. The convex shape gives a different distance perception, but after using
this mirror for the past 14 years, I am very used to judging distance with
it and don't get tricked by it.

--
Cheers
Peter

~~~ ~ [email protected]
~~ ~ _- \,
~~ (*)/ (*)
 
D

DaveB

Guest
Peter Signorini wrote:
> "Peter Miller" wrote:
>
>> While I find it useful for letting me know there is traffic behind me,
>> mirrors can never be depended upon to check if the road is clear. False
>> negatives will kill ya. Just like in a car or on a motorbike, you must
>> still have a look over your shoulder before shifting into another lane.

>
> The vaue of a mirror is not as a substitute for the all-important head check
> before making a rght turn/lane change. They simply reduce the frequency of
> hed checking needed, and give you much greater information about traffic and
> its movements at all times.


Also very handy on family rides to keep track of others. Also with the
right angle can tell if daughter on trailer bike is actually holding the
handlebars :(

DaveB
 
O

OzCableguy

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> wondering about the wisdom of using rear view mirrors,
> especially in city traffic.


I love 'em. If nothing else they make you feel much more confident in
traffic because you can see what's happening all around you at once. The
mount is the key though. If they hang under the bar like the cateye
(http://tinyurl.com/yvzppw) you only see your elbow and if you try to mount
it above the bar it just gets in the way. I finally found the Mirrycle and
have been pretty happy with it as it both gets it away from your grip and
outwards so you can see past your body directly behind much better. See
http://www.mirrycle.com/mountainmirrycle.htm

--
www.ozcableguy.com
www.oztechnologies.com
 
D

DeF

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> wondering about the wisdom of using rear view mirrors,
> especially in city traffic.
> I visited a couple of bike shops here in Adelaide and the sales staff
> there didn't have too much positive to say about them, although they
> stocked the type that attaches to the handle bar. One shop had
> stocked
> the helmet type several years ago, but had discontinued them
> primarily
> because they shook too much to be of any use.
> Rec.Bicycles has a thread dealing specifically with the helmet types
> and
> opinion seems to be that they are an asset.
> Asset or not, I rarely see rear view mirrors on bikes here in
> Adelaide.
>
> Thanks in advance.
>


For many years I had a CatEye Mirrorcle on my
bike. I have a dominant left eye (ie can't see
very well out of the right eye) so I found it
pretty useful. This mirror mounted on the brake
hoods of my tourer and was very much out of the way.
This was in the days before hidden cables - the
brake cable went through the mirror mount.

Since I've moved to hidden cables, I've not used
a mirror and there are times that I miss it,
especially when riding in traffic. I've not found
a good replacement in terms of a mirror that provides
good vision and does not get in the way. I've never
tried a helmet mirror and given my right eye problem,
I'm pretty sure it won't work for me.

I think Zebee's suggestion is the way to go - suck it
and see.

DeF

--
e-mail: [email protected] finger.murdoch.edu.au
To reply, you'll have to remove your finger.
 
D

DaveB

Guest
Joel Mayes wrote:
> On 2007-03-26, OzCableguy <[email protected]> wrote:
>> <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>> wondering about the wisdom of using rear view mirrors,
>>> especially in city traffic.

>
>> http://www.mirrycle.com/mountainmirrycle.htm

>
>
> They make some nice gear!, I like the invisabell ( a bell that plugs
> into the end of your bars and bar-ends, Can you tell me who is Oz stocks
> Mirrycle?
>
> Cheers
>
> joel
>


Ivanhoe Cycles have them. I got one on my new bike. Works well but
sticks out too far (fits into the bar end) and is starting to give me
the sh!ts in tight maneuvering in peak hr traffic.

DaveB
 
J

Joel Mayes

Guest
On 2007-03-26, DaveB <[email protected]> wrote:
> Joel Mayes wrote:


>
> Ivanhoe Cycles have them. I got one on my new bike. Works well but
> sticks out too far (fits into the bar end) and is starting to give me
> the sh!ts in tight maneuvering in peak hr traffic.
>
> DaveB



Cheers!

My partner has cut down flat bars which are getting pretty crowded, one
of these will make a great suprise!

Thanks

Joel
 
N

Nick Payne

Guest
I use a helmet mirror but fit it to my glasses.
http://www.users.on.net/~njpayne/bikestuff/GLASSES.JPG. It's a helmet mirror
with the mounting pad for the helmet chopped off and some heatshrink tubing
to attach it to the side of the glasses. Once I had the mirror position
sorted out I used a bit of superglue under the heatshrink to fix it in
position.

Works well for road racing as well. I never have to turn my head to see
who's behind / if there's a gap / are they gaining etc.

Nick

<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> wondering about the wisdom of using rear view mirrors,
> especially in city traffic.
> I visited a couple of bike shops here in Adelaide and the sales staff
> there didn't have too much positive to say about them, although they
> stocked the type that attaches to the handle bar. One shop had
> stocked
> the helmet type several years ago, but had discontinued them
> primarily
> because they shook too much to be of any use.
> Rec.Bicycles has a thread dealing specifically with the helmet types
> and
> opinion seems to be that they are an asset.
> Asset or not, I rarely see rear view mirrors on bikes here in
> Adelaide.
 
B

Boostland

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> wondering about the wisdom of using rear view mirrors,
> especially in city traffic.
> I visited a couple of bike shops here in Adelaide and the sales staff
> there didn't have too much positive to say about them, although they
> stocked the type that attaches to the handle bar. One shop had
> stocked
> the helmet type several years ago, but had discontinued them
> primarily
> because they shook too much to be of any use.
> Rec.Bicycles has a thread dealing specifically with the helmet types
> and
> opinion seems to be that they are an asset.
> Asset or not, I rarely see rear view mirrors on bikes here in
> Adelaide.
>
> Thanks in advance.
>


And another to look at for those that replied here ;)

<
http://groups.google.com.au/group/a...ing+rear+view+mirrors&rnum=1#d4ba55bdb4e1af04 >