Rear wheel lock

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Andy, Jun 16, 2003.

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  1. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Yesterday night I had my bike stolen (in the USA). It was from inside my garage, and thus it was not
    locked to a fixed point.

    A few weeks ago I was in Amsterdam. I saw that many bikes have a special rear wheel lock. The
    bicycle I rented there had it, and I really liked the operation of the lock. It is permanently
    attached to the frame. The key stays in place until the lock is on. It is kind of an immobilizer,
    the bike can be lifted and taken away, but not ridden on. So it is to be used as a second lock, in
    addition to a cable or U-lock.

    Questions:

    1) Does this lock exist as an add-on, or is it only a factory installed device ?

    2) Is it compatible with bicycles with rear caliper brakes ? Most US bikes have caliper brakes, but
    most of the bikes in Holland, including the one I rented, have rear coaster brakes.

    3) Is this type of lock being sold in the USA ?

    Thanks, Andy (bikeless)
     
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  2. Paul Hays

    Paul Hays Guest

    On Mon, 16 Jun 2003 15:18:49 -0700, Andy wrote (in message
    <[email protected]>):

    > Yesterday night I had my bike stolen (in the USA). It was from inside my garage, and thus it was
    > not locked to a fixed point.
    >
    > A few weeks ago I was in Amsterdam. I saw that many bikes have a special rear wheel lock. The
    > bicycle I rented there had it, and I really liked the operation of the lock. It is permanently
    > attached to the frame. The key stays in place until the lock is on. It is kind of an immobilizer,
    > the bike can be lifted and taken away, but not ridden on. So it is to be used as a second lock, in
    > addition to a cable or U-lock.
    >
    > Questions:
    >
    > 1) Does this lock exist as an add-on, or is it only a factory installed device ?

    It is available as an "add-on", but I think you will have difficulty finding it at a bike shop. Most
    that I have seen are pretty flimsy... the point being that if someone has the tools to get through a
    U-lock, then one of thes wouldn't offer much protection.

    > 2) Is it compatible with bicycles with rear caliper brakes ? Most US bikes have caliper brakes,
    > but most of the bikes in Holland, including the one I rented, have rear coaster brakes.
    >
    > 3) Is this type of lock being sold in the USA ?
    >

    I've seen them for sale in toy-stores and 99Cent stores, which should give you an idea of
    their quality.

    Under what circumstances are you thinking of using one of these things?

    P
     
  3. jan

    jan Guest

    Andy wrote:

    >
    > 1) Does this lock exist as an add-on, or is it only a factory installed device ?

    Yes. Assa and Abus both make a fixed lock that is approved by Finnish (and most EU) Insurance
    Companies.

    > 2) Is it compatible with bicycles with rear caliper brakes ? Most US bikes have caliper brakes,
    > but most of the bikes in Holland, including the one I rented, have rear coaster brakes.

    Frame can have mounting screws for the lock, if so, there's a model to fit them. If there are no
    mounting screws on the frame, another lock model exists to attach it with zip-ties (like). Both work
    nicely and are compatible with caliper brakes, I use them.

    > 3) Is this type of lock being sold in the USA ?

    No idea.

    Jan
     
  4. On 16 Jun 2003 15:18:49 -0700, [email protected] (Andy) wrote:

    >A few weeks ago I was in Amsterdam. I saw that many bikes have a special rear wheel lock. The
    >bicycle I rented there had it, and I really liked the operation of the lock. It is permanently
    >attached to the frame. The key stays in place until the lock is on. It is kind of an immobilizer,
    >the bike can be lifted and taken away, but not ridden on. So it is to be used as a second lock, in
    >addition to a cable or U-lock.

    You're looking for an AXA ring lock, there. The cheaper versions (AXA brand -- the nonbrand $2 ones
    you can open with a clothespin -- not a good idea) work just fine, the more expensive ones take
    slightly longer to break open, and can be fitted with a cable that locks into the lock. A separate
    cable lock is a better idea, though, the cables aren't particularly strong, fairly expensive, and if
    you break open the cylinder of the AXA lock the cable drops out as well, plus you can't secure the
    cable to the bike for storage while riding, such that when you're only dashing into the shop for 5
    minutes, it's usually loose somewhere and can be stolen.

    >Questions:
    >
    >1) Does this lock exist as an add-on, or is it only a factory installed device ?

    On dutch bikes, the seatstays usually have holes drilled in them in the right place to install these
    locks using self-tapping "parker" screws. For when the holes are damaged or your bike doesn't have
    them, you can buy a mounting kit that will allow you to mount them on most standard seatstays. I
    think there's also a differently sized kit that fits oversized stays.

    >2) Is it compatible with bicycles with rear caliper brakes ? Most US bikes have caliper brakes, but
    > most of the bikes in Holland, including the one I rented, have rear coaster brakes.

    Actually, the majority have drum brakes, with a 3 speed sturmey AW hub -- the coaster brake ones are
    in the minority as far as I can tell, and basically just cheaper models.

    But yes, they can be mounted with calipers. You mount them on the other side of the stays from the
    calipers. Waaaay back I've briefly had a bike with calipers, as I remember brake pads and
    pain-in-the-assedness of them, and I've always had a ring lock on all of my bikes, for convenience.
    They are *very* handy for small distance shopping traffic.

    >3) Is this type of lock being sold in the USA ?

    That's a good question, and I don't know. Looking at harris, QBP doesn't carry ring locks. Keying
    "axa ring lock" into google mainly seems to find british shops.

    http://www.amba-marketing.com/products.php?cid=4&pid=5 That's the SL-7, the expensive one mentioned
    above. There's also the SL-9, which is apparently more permanently (but not welded, or anything)
    attached to the frame, but can't be bought retail.

    The cheaper version is found here on the amnufacturer site: http://www.axaveilig.nl/axafiets.htm ;
    "Veiligheidssloten" (safety locks), "veiligheidsslot". Product info shows that you can get a
    mounting kit for
    12/14 mm stays or 16/7.

    If you really can't find any shops anywhere, I can go into my LBS and get one for you. Mail me, if
    necessary.

    Jasper
     
  5. On Mon, 16 Jun 2003 21:28:38 -0700, Paul Hays <[email protected]> wrote:

    >It is available as an "add-on", but I think you will have difficulty finding it at a bike shop.
    >Most that I have seen are pretty flimsy... the point being that if someone has the tools to get
    >through a U-lock, then one of thes wouldn't offer much protection.

    U-locks you generally break by using leverage to shear off internal parts in the locking parts, not
    by hacking through the U itself. The good quality AXA ring locks have exposed metal bolts that are
    13 mm hardened steel. Slightly thinner than most U-locks, but not excessively so, and it's very hard
    to get significant leverage on them without damasging the seatstays and/or the rim.

    You can use a heavy duty angle grinder to cut through them within a minute or so, but most thieves
    don't carry portable heavy duty angle grinders.

    >I've seen them for sale in toy-stores and 99Cent stores, which should give you an idea of
    >their quality.

    You're thinking of *completely* the wrong quality levels. The ones with the 'keys' that are flat
    bits of metal with a protrusion which can be unlocked with a hairpin, style? Or maybe something like
    http://www.goldstarind.com/gs107.jpg ? Had one of those on my kiddie bike, back when. It sucked, but
    then again, if I lost the key -- and I did so regularly -- I could unlock with a paperclip.

    In the Netherlands, with 900.000 bike thefts a year on a bike population of 17 million and a people
    population of 16 million, a ring lock alone, even a good one, isn't enough to keep a nice bike,
    especially because it doesn't lock to the outside world, and especially in high risk areas. Most
    bike theft insurance policies exclude being parked in front of a stations, for example. It's usually
    enough for a beater bike, though. Especially the Axa SL-7/9, that one is pretty much good for 3-5
    minutes of a bike thief's time -- and that's a *lot*.

    http://www.amba-marketing.com/products.php?cid=4&pid=5

    Jasper
     
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