rear wheel rubbing against chainstay

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Craig Bryant, Feb 17, 2003.

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  1. Craig Bryant

    Craig Bryant Guest

    howdy,

    i have a recurring problem with my rear wheel rubbing against the left chainstay. it happened the
    first time when i rode it home from my lbs after purchase. if i tighten the hell out of the quick
    release skewer, it doesn't come back so much (to the point that i need both hands to open it), but
    surely that can't be good for the skewer. it's an older frame with screws in the dropouts, but they
    seem to be at the same length.

    is it a frame issue? i can't imagine it's my massively muscular legs just ripping the wheel from the
    dropouts...

    thanks!
     
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  2. Will Wong

    Will Wong Guest

    I think it's your skewer. I had this happen when I used a lightweight Ti Curve skewer with little
    leverage in my horizontal rear dropouts. I switched back to a tried and true Cro-Mo skewer and
    problem went away.

    "craig bryant" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > howdy,
    >
    > i have a recurring problem with my rear wheel rubbing against the left chainstay. it happened the
    > first time when i rode it home from my lbs after purchase. if i tighten the hell out of the quick
    > release skewer, it doesn't come back so much (to the point that i need both hands to open it), but
    > surely that can't be good for the skewer. it's an older frame with screws in the dropouts, but
    > they seem to be at the same length.
    >
    > is it a frame issue? i can't imagine it's my massively muscular legs just ripping the wheel from
    > the dropouts...
    >
    > thanks!
     
  3. "Will Wong" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I think it's your skewer. I had this happen when I used a lightweight Ti Curve skewer with little
    > leverage in my horizontal rear dropouts. I switched back to a tried and true Cro-Mo skewer and
    > problem went away.
    >
    >
    > "craig bryant" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > howdy,
    > >
    > > i have a recurring problem with my rear wheel rubbing against the left chainstay. it happened
    > > the first time when i rode it home from my lbs after purchase. if i tighten the hell out of the
    > > quick release skewer, it doesn't come back so much (to the point that i need both hands to open
    > > it), but surely that can't be good for the skewer. it's an older frame with screws in the
    > > dropouts, but they seem to be at the same length.
    > >
    > > is it a frame issue? i can't imagine it's my massively muscular legs just ripping the wheel from
    > > the dropouts...
    > >
    > > thanks!

    Perhaps the skewer is too long (unlikely)or the axle is too long (probably). Result: it feels tight,
    but there is insufficient clamping force where you need it. You could try adjusting the qr to what
    feels like a normal adjustment, open it (do not unscrew it) and remove the wheel. Then try closing
    the qr to see if it clamps on the axle. If it does, go back to your lbs for a fix.

    The axle length could be OK, but the hub not centered on it. Look to see if the length of axle
    exposed on each side is equal. If it's too long on one side, it will cause the qr to lock on the
    axle before fully engaging the dropout.

    Good luck, Steve Shapiro

    Steve Shapiro
     
  4. Stu

    Stu Guest

    not that l know alot about then, so just an idea. did you get a new wheel or new bearings in your
    old wheel? if so maybe your axle is to long(if it is a new wheel) or over to one side(if its had new
    bearings) and the QR is tightening onto the end of the axle instead of the frame
     
  5. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "craig bryant" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > howdy,
    >
    > i have a recurring problem with my rear wheel rubbing against the left chainstay. it happened the
    > first time when i rode it home from my lbs after purchase. if i tighten the hell out of the quick
    > release skewer, it doesn't come back so much (to the point that i need both hands to open it), but
    > surely that can't be good for the skewer. it's an older frame with screws in the dropouts, but
    > they seem to be at the same length.
    >
    > is it a frame issue? i can't imagine it's my massively muscular legs just ripping the wheel from
    > the dropouts...
    >
    > thanks!

    Oil the cam in the head of the skewer and it will actually clamp when you throw the lever.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  6. M Gagnon

    M Gagnon Guest

    "craig bryant" <[email protected]> a √©crit dans le message de news:
    [email protected]
    > howdy,
    >
    > i have a recurring problem with my rear wheel rubbing against the left chainstay. it happened the
    > first time when i rode it home from my lbs after purchase. if i tighten the hell out of the quick
    > release skewer, it doesn't come back so much (to the point that i need both hands to open it), but
    > surely that can't be good for the skewer. it's an older frame with screws in the dropouts, but
    > they seem to be at the same length.
    >
    > is it a frame issue? i can't imagine it's my massively muscular legs just ripping the wheel from
    > the dropouts...
    >
    > thanks!

    Is it a bike with horizontal dropouts (typical of pre-1985 bikes)? If so, the force you exert on the
    pedals tends to pull the wheel. It shouldn't be a problem under normal circumstances, but...

    1. The wheel is severely out of true (ex.: broken spoke). This is unlikely with a new bike, but
    still could happen, so I'm trying to get rid of the obvious. You might have placed the wheel
    correctly, but it starts rubbing at the place it is wobbling, especially when you twist the frame
    under stress. Diagnostic: centre the wheel and spin it to make sure the wheel is true. Solution:
    repair the wheel.

    2. The axis (the axis itself, not the quick release) is not properly centred, and is too long on one
    side. What happens then is that your skewer pushes on the axle itself rather than on the
    dropouts, and there is not enough pressure to keep the wheel in place. Solution: with cone
    wrenches, recentre the axle. On a related note, if the skewer is too long (ex.: axle for 130 mm
    with a wheel and in a frame spaced at 126 mm), try adding a washer _inside_ the dropouts to
    spread the wheel.

    3. Too many people beforehand applied too much pressure on the same spot, and the dropout is
    slightly gouged. Then, when you place the wheel, it tends to "slide" into the depression.
    Solution: the exact solution depends on the problem, but you might try to seat the dropouts
    differently, file (lightly) the offending dropout, etc.

    REgards,

    Michel Gagnon
     
  7. craig bryant wrote:
    > howdy,
    >
    > i have a recurring problem with my rear wheel rubbing against the left chainstay. it happened the
    > first time when i rode it home from my lbs after purchase. if i tighten the hell out of the quick
    > release skewer, it doesn't come back so much (to the point that i need both hands to open it), but
    > surely that can't be good for the skewer. it's an older frame with screws in the dropouts, but
    > they seem to be at the same length.
    >
    > is it a frame issue? i can't imagine it's my massively muscular legs just ripping the wheel from
    > the dropouts...
    >
    > thanks!

    Take it back to the LBS and ask them to sort it out for you.
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
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