reasonable priced walking boots

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by S Gibber, Aug 26, 2004.

  1. S Gibber

    S Gibber Guest

    Anyone recommend a decent pair of first timer walking boots and/or decent
    online retailer that does them, i will try them on first at high street shop
    before buying online;-)

    TIA

    Steve
     
    Tags:


  2. Darren G

    Darren G Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, nospam13
    @thankyou.com says...
    > Anyone recommend a decent pair of first timer walking boots and/or decent
    > online retailer that does them, i will try them on first at high street shop
    > before buying online;-)


    I guess the standard answer is just getting a pair that fit is the best
    recommendation. But to try and be a bit more helpful ...

    How do you intend to use them: on or off trail; one the level, in the
    hills or in the mountains; walking or scrambling, UK or wider afield, 3
    or 4 seasons, budget, etc.

    The answers to these types of question are likely to influence the
    type/rigidity of sole required, type of upper, any special need (eg
    crampons), ...



    --
    Darren
     
  3. S Gibber

    S Gibber Guest

    "Darren G" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, nospam13
    > @thankyou.com says...


    >
    > I guess the standard answer is just getting a pair that fit is the best
    > recommendation. But to try and be a bit more helpful ...
    >
    > How do you intend to use them: on or off trail; one the level, in the
    > hills or in the mountains; walking or scrambling, UK or wider afield, 3
    > or 4 seasons, budget, etc.


    Hills, walking, uk and around £50 or a bit more if nothing in that price
    range to match needs. Need to be waterproof and easy to clean as will be
    used mainly in late autumn/winter/early spring.

    > The answers to these types of question are likely to influence the
    > type/rigidity of sole required, type of upper, any special need (eg
    > crampons), ...

    I have no special needs as far as i am aware!

    I would like to know the advantages/disadvantages between leather or suede.
    Hawkshead seem to be cheap price wise, it there a reason?
    thanks
     
  4. Bitstring <[email protected]>, from the wonderful
    person S Gibber <[email protected]> said
    >Anyone recommend a decent pair of first timer walking boots and/or decent
    >online retailer that does them, i will try them on first at high street shop
    >before buying online;-)


    You realise of course that if everyone does that, there won't be any
    high street shops left for you to try them at? Personally I'd try AND
    buy in the high street - way easier to take them back if they are not
    comfortable after a few days hiking round the living room.

    --
    GSV Three Minds in a Can
    Outgoing Msgs are Turing Tested,and indistinguishable from human typing.
     
  5. S Gibber

    S Gibber Guest

    "GSV Three Minds in a Can" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > You realise of course that if everyone does that, there won't be any
    > high street shops left for you to try them at?


    Heck, you pay high street prices if you like. I will save my hard earned
    money and buy online if cheaper....


    Personally I'd try AND
    > buy in the high street - way easier to take them back if they are not
    > comfortable after a few days hiking round the living room.


    I have returned many things online and without doubt found it easier than
    trying to explain to a sales person why i dont want the product, the distant
    selling law is great!!!!
     
  6. Bitstring <[email protected]>, from the wonderful
    person S Gibber <[email protected]> said
    >
    >"GSV Three Minds in a Can" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>
    >> You realise of course that if everyone does that, there won't be any
    >> high street shops left for you to try them at?

    >
    >Heck, you pay high street prices if you like. I will save my hard earned
    >money and buy online if cheaper....


    You need to negotiate better. Many high street dealer will match prices
    if given a chance .. including postage of course.
    >
    >Personally I'd try AND
    >> buy in the high street - way easier to take them back if they are not
    >> comfortable after a few days hiking round the living room.

    >
    >I have returned many things online and without doubt found it easier than
    >trying to explain to a sales person why i dont want the product, the distant
    >selling law is great!!!!


    If you enjoy paying two way postage, yes.

    --
    GSV Three Minds in a Can
    Outgoing Msgs are Turing Tested,and indistinguishable from human typing.
     
  7. Darren G

    Darren G Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    > Bitstring <[email protected]>, from the wonderful
    > person S Gibber <[email protected]> said
    > >Anyone recommend a decent pair of first timer walking boots and/or decent
    > >online retailer that does them, i will try them on first at high street shop
    > >before buying online;-)

    >
    > You realise of course that if everyone does that, there won't be any
    > high street shops left for you to try them at? Personally I'd try AND
    > buy in the high street - way easier to take them back if they are not
    > comfortable after a few days hiking round the living room.
    >


    Or do it my way ... get an online price, go into the high street and
    haggle. Most places, even big chains, will budge when presented with a
    valid lower price.

    --
    Darren
     
  8. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    GSV Three Minds in a Can wrote:
    > Bitstring <[email protected]>, from the wonderful
    > person S Gibber <[email protected]> said
    >
    >> Anyone recommend a decent pair of first timer walking boots and/or
    >> decent
    >> online retailer that does them, i will try them on first at high
    >> street shop
    >> before buying online;-)


    > You realise of course that if everyone does that, there won't be any
    > high street shops left for you to try them at? Personally I'd try AND
    > buy in the high street - way easier to take them back if they are not
    > comfortable after a few days hiking round the living room.


    That's the longer term practical side of it, other than that using a
    service the shop provides and that is worth something tangible, yet
    choosing not to pay, is very bad manners! Payment isn't just about not
    stealing, but for rewarding useful service. I'd hate to be doing the
    tables at any restaurants the OP eats in...

    Beyond that, what's the intended use? I have several pairs of boots
    plus trainers and sandals and fell shoes I'll wear on different walks.
    It's silly buying heavier than you need, just costs more and reduces
    comfort.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  9. Bitstring <[email protected]>, from the wonderful person
    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> said
    >GSV Three Minds in a Can wrote:
    >> Bitstring <[email protected]>, from the
    >>wonderful person S Gibber <[email protected]> said
    >>
    >>> Anyone recommend a decent pair of first timer walking boots and/or
    >>>decent
    >>> online retailer that does them, i will try them on first at high
    >>>street shop
    >>> before buying online;-)

    >
    >> You realise of course that if everyone does that, there won't be any
    >>high street shops left for you to try them at? Personally I'd try AND
    >>buy in the high street - way easier to take them back if they are not
    >>comfortable after a few days hiking round the living room.

    >
    >That's the longer term practical side of it, other than that using a
    >service the shop provides and that is worth something tangible, yet
    >choosing not to pay, is very bad manners! Payment isn't just about not
    >stealing, but for rewarding useful service. I'd hate to be doing the
    >tables at any restaurants the OP eats in...


    Yeah, I was trying to find some practical justification for the OP to
    behave like a civilized human being, since it no longer seems to come
    naturally to many people. 8>.

    >Beyond that, what's the intended use? I have several pairs of boots
    >plus trainers and sandals and fell shoes I'll wear on different walks.
    >It's silly buying heavier than you need, just costs more and reduces
    >comfort.


    But it's a bitch when you get to some point on the route and realize you
    are 'under-shod'. I always look at what I think I'll need, and then go
    up one grade. In June/July you could have gone anywhere in Shropshire in
    regular trainers most days .. after the recent rains, waterproof boots
    are needed on half the B-roads. 8<,

    --
    GSV Three Minds in a Can
    Outgoing Msgs are Turing Tested,and indistinguishable from human typing.
     
  10. John Laird

    John Laird Guest

    On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 22:45:18 +0100, Darren G <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    >says...
    >> Bitstring <[email protected]>, from the wonderful
    >> person S Gibber <[email protected]> said
    >> >Anyone recommend a decent pair of first timer walking boots and/or decent
    >> >online retailer that does them, i will try them on first at high street shop
    >> >before buying online;-)

    >>
    >> You realise of course that if everyone does that, there won't be any
    >> high street shops left for you to try them at? Personally I'd try AND
    >> buy in the high street - way easier to take them back if they are not
    >> comfortable after a few days hiking round the living room.
    >>

    >
    >Or do it my way ... get an online price, go into the high street and
    >haggle. Most places, even big chains, will budge when presented with a
    >valid lower price.


    And why should they reduce their profit to match a warehouse retailer
    without the overheads of high street shopfronts, rates, rents and staff
    salaries ? Even the traditional good guys like John Lewis will decline to
    match internet prices as a matter of policy.

    There's a distinction between not feeling ripped-off and taking undue
    advantage, imho.

    --
    I want to be a modirater when I grow up.

    Mail john rather than nospam...
     
  11. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    GSV Three Minds in a Can wrote:

    > But it's a bitch when you get to some point on the route and realize you
    > are 'under-shod'. I always look at what I think I'll need, and then go
    > up one grade.


    I don't, because I don't like overcooking and overworking my feet in
    overwrought footwear, and I find it's very unlikely to lead to really
    major problems. In summer I'll do most things in sandals, making
    exceptions for big scree run descents and scrambling which might involve
    foot jams. I've done the Aonach Eagach in Tevas and didn't have any
    trouble, I think most people tend to oversetimate the footwear they need
    (ever seen anyone in heavy boots in a country park? I certainly have).

    > In June/July you could have gone anywhere in Shropshire in
    > regular trainers most days ..


    You could've gone anywhere in the UK in trainers on just about any days!

    > after the recent rains, waterproof boots
    > are needed on half the B-roads. 8<,


    Define "needed". For really wet stuff, wellies if you insist on keeping
    your feet dry or sandals if you're happy to let them get wet on the
    understanding they'll dry out within minutes of emerging from the pools.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  12. Andy Howell

    Andy Howell Guest

    On 26/8/04 9:48 pm, in article [email protected], "S
    Gibber" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hills, walking, uk and around £50 or a bit more if nothing in that price
    > range to match needs. Need to be waterproof and easy to clean as will be
    > used mainly in late autumn/winter/early spring.


    I would stick to Leather myself as a good all round boot. Have a look at
    the Contour range and also the new Brasher which is built for the hills
    (forget the name) and which has received reasonable reviews.

    --
    Andy Howell
    Birmingham, UK
     
  13. Bob Hobden

    Bob Hobden Guest

    "Peter Clinch" wrote after
    > GSV Three Minds in a Can wrote:
    >
    > > But it's a bitch when you get to some point on the route and realize you
    > > are 'under-shod'. I always look at what I think I'll need, and then go
    > > up one grade.

    >
    > I don't, because I don't like overcooking and overworking my feet in
    > overwrought footwear, and I find it's very unlikely to lead to really
    > major problems. In summer I'll do most things in sandals, making
    > exceptions for big scree run descents and scrambling which might involve
    > foot jams. I've done the Aonach Eagach in Tevas and didn't have any
    > trouble, I think most people tend to oversetimate the footwear they need
    > (ever seen anyone in heavy boots in a country park? I certainly have).
    >

    I agree, it's true most people are over shod, but there may be a reason.
    The trouble with ordinary "country path" walking in the UK in general is the
    flora. Nettles, brambles etc and the occasional barbed wire along the ground
    will cause pain and damage to unprotected feet. A lot of pathways are also
    Bridleways, and therefore churned up after rain, so any water is mud with
    added Horse manure which is not good in wounds. That is why we normally use
    leather boots all year round and most hillwalkers, who would shun such
    places, would consider us overshod.
    Talking of being under shod, I did get an elderly lady with a walking stick
    in heeled fashion sandals on a walk in the Surrey Hills I organised this
    year for a pensioners group, after I had stressed good footwear with a
    decent tread!
    --
    Regards
    Bob
    in Runnymede, 17miles west of London, UK
     
  14. S Gibber

    S Gibber Guest

    "> >"GSV Three Minds in a Can" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > You need to negotiate better. Many high street dealer will match prices
    > if given a chance .. including postage of course.


    why should you have to haggle? If a seller cannot match his competitors then
    he will no longer continue trading, its hard but thats life. Ever heard of
    the expression "rip off Britain".

    >> >I have returned many things online and without doubt found it easier

    than
    > >trying to explain to a sales person why i dont want the product, the

    distant
    > >selling law is great!!!!

    >
    > If you enjoy paying two way postage, yes.


    The amount i save is always greater than two way postage and in alot of
    cases alot more, plus if the difference is marginal (not in many cases) i
    would buy from a high street. If I was to spend £200 on the high street i
    would expect to get the similar product for around £150 online. Saving £50
    which is alot of postage in anyones money!
     
  15. S Gibber

    S Gibber Guest

    "> >> You realise of course that if everyone does that, there won't be any
    > >>high street shops left for you to try them at? Personally I'd try AND
    > >>buy in the high street - way easier to take them back if they are not
    > >>comfortable after a few days hiking round the living room.

    > >
    > >That's the longer term practical side of it, other than that using a
    > >service the shop provides and that is worth something tangible, yet
    > >choosing not to pay, is very bad manners! Payment isn't just about not
    > >stealing, but for rewarding useful service. I'd hate to be doing the
    > >tables at any restaurants the OP eats in...

    >
    > Yeah, I was trying to find some practical justification for the OP to
    > behave like a civilized human being, since it no longer seems to come
    > naturally to many people. 8>.



    Could you please focus on the threads rather than witter! I m sure there are
    newsgroups on manners and etiquette!

    thanks
     
  16. "S Gibber" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:M%[email protected]
    >
    > The amount i save is always greater than two way postage and in alot of
    > cases alot more, plus if the difference is marginal (not in many cases) i
    > would buy from a high street. If I was to spend £200 on the high street i
    > would expect to get the similar product for around £150 online. Saving £50
    > which is alot of postage in anyones money!


    If I can find something for £150 on-line, I always offer that price to a
    local shop. Most of the time they will take it. That way I can always try
    stuff on *and* buy it cheaply. And they will be there when I want to try
    something else on.

    With your attitude, you will soon find you are unwelcome in shops, if they
    are still around to trade.

    Sales staff are used to haggling, and if they are not, that's all to my
    advantage. They still make money out of me, just a bit less than if I
    didn't make them an offer. I let the over-wedged pay full price.

    You can get 10-20% off of all full prices in virtually all of the outdoor
    shops. You just have to get them to invest a little time in you and then
    ask politely. If you've got a good price on-line, print it out and take it.
    Most places will match prices (I usually find I make on the postage too).

    Use the on-line retailers for what they are useful for - giving you a
    bargaining tool for spending less in real shops. Think about it. It makes
    sense in the long term.

    With the special offers in the sales at the moment, you can find a very good
    deal if you are willing to buy when you try.

    Have fun,
    Paul
     
  17. Bitstring <[email protected]>, from the wonderful person
    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> said
    <snip>
    >> In June/July you could have gone anywhere in Shropshire in regular
    >>trainers most days ..

    >
    >You could've gone anywhere in the UK in trainers on just about any days!


    I'll believe you, but data not available to me.

    >
    >> after the recent rains, waterproof boots are needed on half the
    >>B-roads. 8<,

    >
    >Define "needed". For really wet stuff, wellies if you insist on
    >keeping your feet dry or sandals if you're happy to let them get wet on
    >the understanding they'll dry out within minutes of emerging from the
    >pools.


    Keeping the water/mud off socks. For some reason I don't dry out as fast
    as you claim to, not even if I am barefoot. And I really dislike mud
    between toes. Walking in wellies isf the pits, IMO ..

    --
    GSV Three Minds in a Can
    Outgoing Msgs are Turing Tested,and indistinguishable from human typing.
     
  18. Bitstring <[email protected]>, from the wonderful person Bob
    Hobden <[email protected]> said
    <snip>
    >I agree, it's true most people are over shod, but there may be a reason.
    >The trouble with ordinary "country path" walking in the UK in general is the
    >flora. Nettles, brambles etc and the occasional barbed wire along the ground
    >will cause pain and damage to unprotected feet.


    My pet hate is grass seeds, which always seem to embed themselves in
    some inaccessible part of my socks, where they will stay for weeks (even
    surviving washing and tumble drying).

    --
    GSV Three Minds in a Can
    Outgoing Msgs are Turing Tested,and indistinguishable from human typing.
     
  19. Bitstring <[email protected]>, from the wonderful
    person S Gibber <[email protected]> said
    >
    >"> >> You realise of course that if everyone does that, there won't be any
    >> >>high street shops left for you to try them at? Personally I'd try AND
    >> >>buy in the high street - way easier to take them back if they are not
    >> >>comfortable after a few days hiking round the living room.
    >> >
    >> >That's the longer term practical side of it, other than that using a
    >> >service the shop provides and that is worth something tangible, yet
    >> >choosing not to pay, is very bad manners! Payment isn't just about not
    >> >stealing, but for rewarding useful service. I'd hate to be doing the
    >> >tables at any restaurants the OP eats in...

    >>
    >> Yeah, I was trying to find some practical justification for the OP to
    >> behave like a civilized human being, since it no longer seems to come
    >> naturally to many people. 8>.

    >
    >Could you please focus on the threads rather than witter! I m sure there are
    >newsgroups on manners and etiquette!


    I suggest you read them then, rather than demonstrating (yet again) your
    apparent lack of civilization. You want free advice of boots, you want
    free trial of same in shops (with no intention to buy there, in fact you
    won't even offer them the option of price matching) and you think you
    can lecture on manners and (n)ettiquette? You, sir, are a jerk.

    <plonk>

    --
    GSV Three Minds in a Can
    Outgoing Msgs are Turing Tested,and indistinguishable from human typing.
     
  20. RJ Webb

    RJ Webb Guest


    >But it's a bitch when you get to some point on the route and realize you
    >are 'under-shod'. I always look at what I think I'll need, and then go
    >up one grade. In June/July you could have gone anywhere in Shropshire in
    >regular trainers most days .. after the recent rains, waterproof boots
    >are needed on half the B-roads.


    And a snorkel on the other half..

    Richard Webb
     
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