Rec: Lemon sage chicken

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Peter Aitken, Jul 12, 2005.

  1. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    For best results use one of the Smart chickens. They cost more but are worth
    it.

    Rinse the chicken and pat dry. You do not have to untie it. Sprinkle some
    salt in the cavity and insert about 8 whole fresh sage leaves and 1/2 a
    lemon sliced thin.

    In a small pan combine juice of 1 lemon, 1/2 stick butter, big pinch salt,
    couple dashes Tabasco, several chopped fresh sage leaves. Heat to a simmer
    then remove from heat.

    Roast at 400 degrees, basting every 10 min or so, until temp in the thigh is
    165 degrees.


    --
    Peter Aitken
    Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
     
    Tags:


  2. Default User

    Default User Guest

    Peter Aitken wrote:
    > For best results use one of the Smart chickens. They cost more but are worth
    > it.


    How smart could this chicken have been, if it ended up being eaten?




    Brian
     
  3. AlleyGator

    AlleyGator Guest

    "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >For best results use one of the Smart chickens. They cost more but are worth
    >it.

    I'm really not being facetious here, I promise. What is Smart. Is
    that a particular brand of say, free-range?

    --
    The Doc says my brain waves closely match those of a crazed ferret.
    At least now I have an excuse.
     
  4. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "AlleyGator" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>For best results use one of the Smart chickens. They cost more but are
    >>worth
    >>it.

    > I'm really not being facetious here, I promise. What is Smart. Is
    > that a particular brand of say, free-range?



    It's a brand. They are never frozen and are "flash cooled" or something that
    preserves freshness and flavor. The Rosengarten Report gives them high
    marks. There are 2 kinds. Organic is more expensive. Natural (or whatever
    they call it) is not organic but is raised without antibiotics and with a
    vegetarian diet (no ground up mad cows!). They are available at
    Harris-Teeter around here (NC). Worth a try - I find them tastier and jucier
    than standard supermarket cluckers.
     
Loading...