Recent Ramblings

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Lindsay, Sep 16, 2005.

  1. Lindsay

    Lindsay Guest

    Fo those interested my recent ramblings can be found on my web site <a
    href="http://caledoniahilltreks.com" target= blank>TEXT</a> or on my
    blog <a href="http://caledoniahilltreks.blogspot.com" target=
    blank>TEXT</a>

    Lindsay
    Caledonia Hilltreks
     
    Tags:


  2. Lindsay

    Lindsay Guest

  3. Lindsay

    Lindsay Guest

  4. druidh

    druidh Guest

    Lindsay wrote:
    > A couple of new walks have been added to my blog at
    > http://caledoniahilltreks.blogspot.com
    >
    > Slainte
    > Lindsay
    > www.caledoniahilltreks.com
    >


    Lindsay - I really do wish you'd stop with these posts. It's bl**dy
    frustrating for the rest of us poor mortals who are stuck in the office
    / at home / with the kids and only manage the occasional esacpe!

    btw - how's the midge count? I was caught by the blighters last night in
    the Pentlands when I stopped to fix a puncture. For heavens sake - it's
    October!


    druidh
     

  5. > btw - how's the midge count? I was caught by the blighters last night in the Pentlands
    > when I stopped to fix a puncture. For heavens sake - it's October!


    None in Glenhsee, or lomond side.

    Nick
     
  6. Lindsay

    Lindsay Guest

    No midges recently too windy.

    Just to annoy you even more see <a
    href="http://www.caledoniahilltreks.blogspot.com"target=_blank>More
    Walks</a>

    You will be glad to stayed in the office/at home.

    By the way you don't have to read them.

    Lindsay
    www.caledoniahilltreks.com
     
  7. Lindsay

    Lindsay Guest

    I was out on Ben Nevis yesterday together with well over one hundred
    charity walkers and made several observations on this walk including
    attire.

    If interested you can read my ramlings at:
    http://caledoniahilltreks.blogspot.com

    No obligation to read it. It just contains my own obeservations.

    Slainte.
     
  8. On 9 Oct 2005 04:21:18 -0700, "Lindsay" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I was out on Ben Nevis yesterday together with well over one hundred
    >charity walkers and made several observations on this walk including
    >attire.


    In your blog you make a particular point about someone on the hill
    wearing shorts.

    Walkers, like cyclists, use their legs for most of the work - this
    generates heat. Wearing shorts, therefore, is not a particular
    problem in cold/damp weather. However, in wet weather water runs down
    the legs, to the socks which wick the water into the boots, therefore
    waterproof overtousers are advisable, gaiters do not solve this
    problem in persistant wet weather.

    I usually wear shorts on the hill - though not in very cold weather
    where I wear some excellent Paramo zip offs or Paramo salopettes. I
    find that waterproof trousers over shorts are *much* more comfortable
    than waterproof trousers over trousers.
     
  9. Lindsay

    Lindsay Guest

    The problem with wearing shorts in cold weather, in particular in the
    case of the guy on Ben Nevis is that the blood vessels are close to the
    surface of the skin on your lower legs and therefore this gives a
    cooling effect to your body and the heart has to work harder to warm up
    the blood to pump it back round the body.

    This could be a disaster if he is already cold leading to the
    possibility of hypothermia. If he has a weak heart it could be even
    more of a disaster.

    Personally I don't wear shorts on the hills I don't get that many
    fine days and if I do there are always the clegs midges and ticks to
    attack you. I prefer to keep covered up.

    As a runner I was always told don't wear shorts if it is less than 10C,
    which is normally the case during the winter months in the North-East
    of Scotland so it will soon be time to put the running shorts away till
    next year.

    Lindsay.
    www.caledoniahilltreks.com
     
  10. On 9 Oct 2005 05:36:07 -0700, "Lindsay" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >As a runner I was always told don't wear shorts if it is less than 10C,
    >which is normally the case during the winter months in the North-East
    >of Scotland so it will soon be time to put the running shorts away till
    >next year.


    Interesting. I have frequently walked in shorts when the tops have
    been below zero, though on dry and still days. I have a photo of me
    standing on top of Am Bodach in February with Ben Nevis in the
    background with me in my zip off shorts, and wearing crampons, taken
    at the same time as Transport for London photographed my old car being
    driven over Tower Bridge and into the Congestion Charging Zone - a
    problem that took 15 months to resolve!

    In any weather or time of year I cycle in shorts. Walking or cycling,
    I've never considered wearing shorts to be a problem, though I may use
    my waterproof trousers to cover up when stopping for lunch, then they
    tend to stay on.

    I take your point about the blood vessels being close to the surface
    but believed that the work of the leg muscles and the increased flow
    of blood kept the temperature up.
     
  11. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

    On Sun, 09 Oct 2005 17:44:44 +0100, Bertie Wiggins
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 9 Oct 2005 05:36:07 -0700, "Lindsay" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>As a runner I was always told don't wear shorts if it is less than 10C,
    >>which is normally the case during the winter months in the North-East
    >>of Scotland so it will soon be time to put the running shorts away till
    >>next year.


    [...]
    >I take your point about the blood vessels being close to the surface
    >but believed that the work of the leg muscles and the increased flow
    >of blood kept the temperature up.


    Surely the bottom line is simply a bit of common sense, and
    recognition that we're all different. If cold, open the sack and put
    on the extra clothes. If not, carry on. Um... I can't really see more
    to it than that.

    Wet fishes,
    --
    ,,
    (**)PeeWiglet~~
    / \ / \ pee AT [guessthisbit].co.uk

    "Is our children learning?"
    g.w.AT [guessthisbit].com
     
  12. On Sun, 09 Oct 2005 18:07:00 +0100, Peewiglet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Surely the bottom line is simply a bit of common sense, and
    >recognition that we're all different. If cold, open the sack and put
    >on the extra clothes. If not, carry on. Um... I can't really see more
    >to it than that.


    My point is that a walker climbing Ben Nevis in shorts in Autumn is
    not in the same danger as a walker climbing Ben Nevis in jeans and
    trainers.
     
  13. AndyP

    AndyP Guest

    "Lindsay" <[email protected]> wrote

    > The problem with wearing shorts in cold weather, in particular in the
    > case of the guy on Ben Nevis is that the blood vessels are close to the
    > surface of the skin on your lower legs and therefore this gives a
    > cooling effect to your body and the heart has to work harder to warm up
    > the blood to pump it back round the body.
    >
    > This could be a disaster if he is already cold leading to the
    > possibility of hypothermia. If he has a weak heart it could be even
    > more of a disaster.


    So long as your head and torso are kept warm the rest of your body should
    follow suit so what you wear on your legs isn't all that important. That's
    the way my body works anyway and I'm sure there's an olde saying from times
    of yore going something like "if you want warm feet wear a hat or chuck
    another serf on the fire". Not sure when yore was exactly and I don't
    suppose every kid left school with 20 A levels like they do nowadays but
    they weren't all daft and some things still hold true.
     

  14. > So long as your head and torso are kept warm the rest of your body should
    > follow suit so what you wear on your legs isn't all that important. That's
    > the way my body works anyway and I'm sure there's an olde saying from times
    > of yore going something like "if you want warm feet wear a hat or chuck
    > another serf on the fire". Not sure when yore was exactly and I don't
    > suppose every kid left school with 20 A levels like they do nowadays but
    > they weren't all daft and some things still hold true.


    Do you not know that your body shuts down the extremities when cold ?

    Thre is very little fat on your scalp and knees.

    Nick
     
  15. AndyP

    AndyP Guest

    "Nick (Scots)" <[email protected]> wrote

    > > So long as your head and torso are kept warm the rest of your body

    should
    > > follow suit so what you wear on your legs isn't all that important.


    > Do you not know that your body shuts down the extremities when cold ?


    Yes, isn't that what I was saying? When it gets cold your body tries to
    keep the brain and vital internal organs warm so it reduces blood flow to
    the extremities. So if you keep your head and torso warm by covering them
    up the body can happily send shedloads of blood around your legs to keep
    them warm. But it doesn't work the other way around. I'd happily go out in
    very cold temps in shorts, a hat and warm jacket but not cosy fleecy
    trousers and a t shirt.
     
  16. On Sun, 09 Oct 2005 20:20:13 GMT, "Nick \(Scots\)" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >> So long as your head and torso are kept warm the rest of your body should
    >> follow suit so what you wear on your legs isn't all that important. That's
    >> the way my body works anyway and I'm sure there's an olde saying from times
    >> of yore going something like "if you want warm feet wear a hat or chuck
    >> another serf on the fire". Not sure when yore was exactly and I don't
    >> suppose every kid left school with 20 A levels like they do nowadays but
    >> they weren't all daft and some things still hold true.

    >
    >Do you not know that your body shuts down the extremities when cold ?
    >
    >Thre is very little fat on your scalp and knees.


    Even so, heat loss from continually moving legs is not going to be
    significant when dry in normal UK temperature ranges.
     
  17. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

    On Sun, 09 Oct 2005 18:23:35 +0100, Bertie Wiggins
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 09 Oct 2005 18:07:00 +0100, Peewiglet <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Surely the bottom line is simply a bit of common sense, and
    >>recognition that we're all different. If cold, open the sack and put
    >>on the extra clothes. If not, carry on. Um... I can't really see more
    >>to it than that.

    >
    >My point is that a walker climbing Ben Nevis in shorts in Autumn is
    >not in the same danger as a walker climbing Ben Nevis in jeans and
    >trainers.


    Yes, sorry Bertie. I was really just thinking that it seemed a bit
    daft to be laying down absolute rules about what should/shouldn't be
    worn, and when. I was thinking more of the post to which you were
    responding than your own.


    Wet fishes,
    --
    ,,
    (**)PeeWiglet~~
    / \ / \ pee AT [guessthisbit].co.uk

    "Is our children learning?"
    g.w.AT [guessthisbit].com
     
  18. AndyP wrote:
    > Yes, isn't that what I was saying? When it gets cold your body tries to
    > keep the brain and vital internal organs warm so it reduces blood flow to
    > the extremities. So if you keep your head and torso warm by covering them
    > up the body can happily send shedloads of blood around your legs to keep
    > them warm. But it doesn't work the other way around. I'd happily go out in
    > very cold temps in shorts, a hat and warm jacket but not cosy fleecy
    > trousers and a t shirt.


    Agree entirely...I've never (yet!) felt my legs getting cold, could be
    due to the layer of fat!! However do often feel the need to have extra
    layers on my top half. Also don't the legs generate heat due to the
    activity involved?

    David.
     
  19. Roger

    Roger Guest

    The message <[email protected]>
    from "[email protected]" <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > Agree entirely...I've never (yet!) felt my legs getting cold, could be
    > due to the layer of fat!! However do often feel the need to have extra
    > layers on my top half. Also don't the legs generate heat due to the
    > activity involved?


    I never wear shorts out walking but I have had trouble with my knees on
    and off over the years and during one consultation with a specialist
    (who decided I wasn't sufficiently impaired to cause the NHS any
    concern) I was informed that the knee caps have no direct blood supply
    and are most at risk when the legs get cold thus explaining why my knee
    trouble was much more prevalent in the winter. Since then I have tried
    to be a bit more careful keeping my legs warm.

    --
    Roger Chapman so far this year 53 summits
    New - 27 (Marilyns 13, Nuttalls 5, Outlying Fells 10)
    Repeats - 26 (Marilyns 10, Nuttalls 17, Wainwrights 12, Outlying Fells 0)
     
  20. Lindsay

    Lindsay Guest

Loading...
Loading...