Recipe for "Urban Spareribs"

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Ray Gordon, Mar 13, 2004.

  1. Ray Gordon

    Ray Gordon Guest

    This is what you do when all you have is a stovetop, but
    you like ribs, and no one around you makes good ones
    (there might be five places in Philadelphia that sell true
    Q'd ribs).

    Ingredients:

    5 lbs. Chinese Style Spareribs 4 oz. Liquid Smoke 18 oz.
    Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ Sauce (or your favorite) 2 oz. Chicken
    Wing Sauce (with cayenne pepper)
    1/4 cup sugar (or to taste) 18 oz. water spices to taste

    To cook:

    2. Parboil the ribs for 20-30 minutes (30 if frozen 20 if
    not frozen).

    3. Combine BBQ sauce, liquid smoke, spices, water, sugar,
    and chicken wing sauce into a frying pan/skillet (takes
    a big frying pan for this). Bring to boil. Time this so
    the marinade is boiling as the ribs are finishing their
    parboiling.

    4. Add ribs to the marinade.

    5. On high heat, cover the ribs with the marinade (shifting
    them occasionally to prevent sticking and to ensure even
    coverage).

    6. Boil down the marinade until it is the same consistency
    as BBQ sauce.

    Takes 60 minutes, serves 5-6, and tastes GREAT.

    Now maybe BBQ ribs are a *little* tastier than this, but if
    all you have is an hour or 90 minutes (including heating the
    parboiling water), and a stovetop, you're not going to do
    much better (though I'm sure some people will get creative
    with the marinade, using wine or something else).

    --
    Everything you need to know about women. FREE!

    http://www.cybersheet.com/library.html The Seduction Library

    http://www.cybersheet.com/hotties.html Why Hotties
    Choose Losers
     
    Tags:


  2. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    >"Ray Gordon"
    >
    >Ingredients:
    >
    >5 lbs. Chinese Style Spareribs

    AFAIK Chinese Style Sparibs are already cooked, to
    perfection.
    >
    >To cook:
    >
    >1. Parboil the ribs for 20-30 minutes (30 if frozen 20 if
    > not frozen).

    I got yer Chinese... phuking plick!

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED
    NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be
    devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  3. Donna Rose

    Donna Rose Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > 1. Parboil the ribs for 20-30 minutes (30 if frozen 20 if
    > not frozen).
    >
    >
    Try this: after you parboil your ribs, taste the
    water. Good, isn't it? Where do you think all that
    flavor came from?

    Parboiling your ribs does nothing but remove flavor from the
    ribs. Great if you're making soup; not so great if you're
    making ribs.

    (at least he didn't call them 'barbecued')
    --
    Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist
    hopes they are.
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, "Ray Gordon"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > This is what you do when all you have is a stovetop, but
    > you like ribs, and no one around you makes good ones
    > (there might be five places in Philadelphia that sell true
    > Q'd ribs).
    <crip snap>
    > 5. Boil down the marinade until it is the same
    > consistency as BBQ sauce.
    >
    > Takes 60 minutes, serves 5-6, and tastes GREAT.
    >
    You forgot Step 6: Throw hideous mess to dogs. Your idea of
    GREAT is waaaaay underneath mine.

    > Now maybe BBQ ribs are a *little* tastier than this, but
    > if all you have is an hour or 90 minutes (including
    > heating the parboiling water), and a stovetop, you're
    > not going to do much better (though I'm sure some people
    > will get creative with the marinade, using wine or
    > something else).

    Why bother with ribs <at all> if you don't have the time,
    patience or equipment to do them right? Sounds mighty stupid
    to me. Ribs aren't so cheap as to waste money doing them
    halfassed as you suggest here. Thus spake this 'pious
    asshole purist BBQ freak'. Thanks for nothing at all, Ray.

    monroe(that's right---stupid)
     
  5. Mraod

    Mraod Guest

    some self-righteous buttbrain wrote:

    >You forgot Step 6: Throw hideous mess to dogs. Your idea of
    >GREAT is waaaaay underneath mine.

    Tried to post this under a new msg due to newsreader
    failure.

    From Wed's NYT's food section, Cesare [somebody]'s
    recipe for oven ribs (pork, I'd adjust the herbs
    downwards for beef):

    7 lbs pork spareribs 3 tbs minced garlic plus two cloves
    sliced 3 tbsp chopped sage 2 tbsp chopper rosemary
    1.5 tbsp coarse salt 1 tbsp black pepper 1 tbsp plus two tsp
    crushed red pepper 3 tbs evoo 2 28oz cans peeled tomatoes
    with juice
    2.5 tbsp worchestershire sauce
    3.5 tbsp tabasco 1 cup white wine

    Combine garlic sage rosemary salt, black pepper and 1 tbsp
    crussshed red pepper. Rub ribs with mixture and marinate at
    least 24 hours

    Heat oven to 375, roast ribs uncovered for 1 hour or until
    brown. Turn ribs over and roast another hour

    Pour evoo into large saucepan and add sliced garlic and
    remaining red pepper. Sautee over medium heat. When garlic
    begins to color add tomatoes, worcestershire sauce, tbsp and
    1.5 cups water. Bring to a boil then simmer. whisk and stir
    mixture. Simmer about 30 minutes

    defat roasting pan. Pour wine, 1 cup water and tomato sauce
    over ribs. Cover pan with foil and roast 40 minutes. Defat
    sauce and roast uncovered for 20 minutes. Rest and serve.
     
  6. Ray Gordon

    Ray Gordon Guest

    > > 1. Parboil the ribs for 20-30 minutes (30 if frozen 20
    > > if not frozen).
    > >
    > >
    > Try this: after you parboil your ribs, taste the water.
    > Good, isn't it?

    Nope, tastes like shit.

    > Where do you think all that flavor came from?

    Two coins slipping out of the bottom of a piggy bank
    doesn't break it.

    > Parboiling your ribs does nothing but remove flavor from
    > the ribs. Great if you're making soup; not so great if
    > you're making ribs.

    Another myth. It's also possible to use more water in the
    marinade and fry-boil the ribs that way if you want to
    eliminate this problem.

    > (at least he didn't call them 'barbecued')

    I call them "urban spareribs," because they are a very good,
    practical recipe for the city dweller.

    If all you have is a stovetop and 90 minutes to work with,
    could you do better?

    --
    Everything you need to know about women. FREE!

    http://www.cybersheet.com/library.html The Seduction Library

    http://www.cybersheet.com/hotties.html Why Hotties
    Choose Losers
     
  7. Ray Gordon

    Ray Gordon Guest

    > defat roasting pan

    Oh? Does the fat taste GOOD? You know where that flavor came
    from? Etc.

    I actually used to take the fat from the roasting pan and
    boil it down into the marinade, then re-marinate the ribs in
    the oven, so the flavor isn't lost.

    If I ever want to make ribs 26 hours in advance, that's a
    good recipe you gave me. Only 2.5 hours of cooking as well!

    I also said a STOVETOP, not an oven. My ribs are made with a
    large pot and a frying pan, nothing more.

    --
    Everything you need to know about women. FREE!

    http://www.cybersheet.com/library.html The Seduction Library

    http://www.cybersheet.com/hotties.html Why Hotties
    Choose Losers
     
  8. Zxcvbob

    Zxcvbob Guest

    Ray Gordon wrote:
    >>defat roasting pan
    >
    >
    > Oh? Does the fat taste GOOD? You know where that flavor
    > came from? Etc.
    >
    > I actually used to take the fat from the roasting pan and
    > boil it down into the marinade, then re-marinate the ribs
    > in the oven, so the flavor isn't lost.
    >
    > If I ever want to make ribs 26 hours in advance,
    > that's a good recipe you gave me. Only 2.5 hours of
    > cooking as well!
    >
    > I also said a STOVETOP, not an oven. My ribs are made with
    > a large pot and a frying pan, nothing more.
    >
    >

    So, why did you change your name from "Modern Caveman"?

    Instead of buying spareribs, buy pork "country style ribs",
    which are not ribs at all but are thick poorly shaped pork
    chops. Bake them in the oven at 250 degrees for about 2
    hours, and serve with your favorite sauce (barbecue sauce or
    otherwise.) Country style "ribs" are cheaper than real ribs,
    meatier, easier to cook, and they taste better than the
    proper pork chops which I think are cut from the other end
    of the loin.

    Best regards, Bob
     
  9. "Ray Gordon" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >> > 1. Parboil the ribs for 20-30 minutes (30 if frozen 20
    >> > if not frozen).
    >> >
    >> >
    >> Try this: after you parboil your ribs, taste the water.
    >> Good, isn't it?
    >
    > Nope, tastes like shit.
    >
    >> Where do you think all that flavor came from?
    >
    > Two coins slipping out of the bottom of a piggy bank
    > doesn't break it.
    >
    >
    >> Parboiling your ribs does nothing but remove flavor from
    >> the ribs. Great if you're making soup; not so great if
    >> you're making ribs.
    >
    > Another myth. It's also possible to use more water in the
    > marinade and fry-boil the ribs that way if you want to
    > eliminate this problem.
    >
    >
    >> (at least he didn't call them 'barbecued')
    >
    > I call them "urban spareribs," because they are a very
    > good, practical recipe for the city dweller.
    >
    > If all you have is a stovetop and 90 minutes to work with,
    > could you do better?

    Yep, spareribs and sauerkraut! Any attempt at making
    "barbequed" spareribs by steaming, simmering, etc., is a
    sacrilege. I'd rather do without than eat that crap.

    Wayne
     
  10. Jack Curry

    Jack Curry Guest

    > If all you have is a stovetop and 90 minutes to work with,
    > could you do better?

    Go for it, dude, but you might want to check the name of
    this newsgroup. It's alt.barbecue.food, which has nothing
    whatever to do with parboiling ribs. I was going to suggest
    that you post your recipe on rec.food.cooking, but I see
    you've already met the resident greeter there, PENMART01.
    You're about as welcome here as Sheldon made you feel there.

    Jack Curry
     
  11. John Gaughan

    John Gaughan Guest

    Ray Gordon wrote:
    > I also said a STOVETOP, not an oven. My ribs are made with
    > a large pot and a frying pan, nothing more.

    My ribs are made on the grill. In the unlikely event that my
    charcoal grill stops working, I would bake or broil ribs
    before boiling them. The vast majority of stoves (including
    mine) also have ovens and broilers, which are much better
    than stovetops for cooking big hunks of meat (ribs, roasts,
    loins, etc).

    --
    John Gaughan http://www.johngaughan.net/
    [email protected]
     
  12. Donna Rose

    Donna Rose Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > If all you have is a stovetop and 90 minutes to work with,
    > could you do better?
    >
    Sure I could. I just wouldn't be making ribs.
    --
    Donna A pessimist believes all women are bad. An optimist
    hopes they are.
     
  13. Jd

    Jd Guest

    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > "Ray Gordon" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >>>> 1. Parboil the ribs for 20-30 minutes (30 if frozen 20
    >>>> if not frozen).
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> Try this: after you parboil your ribs, taste the water.
    >>> Good, isn't it?
    >>
    >> Nope, tastes like shit.
    >>
    >>> Where do you think all that flavor came from?
    >>
    >> Two coins slipping out of the bottom of a piggy bank
    >> doesn't break
    >> it.
    >>
    >>
    >>> Parboiling your ribs does nothing but remove flavor from
    >>> the ribs. Great if you're making soup; not so great if
    >>> you're making ribs.
    >>
    >> Another myth. It's also possible to use more water in the
    >> marinade and fry-boil the ribs that way if you want to
    >> eliminate this problem.
    >>
    >>
    >>> (at least he didn't call them 'barbecued')
    >>
    >> I call them "urban spareribs," because they are a very
    >> good, practical recipe for the city dweller.
    >>
    >> If all you have is a stovetop and 90 minutes to work
    >> with, could you do better?
    >
    > Yep, spareribs and sauerkraut! Any attempt at making
    > "barbequed" spareribs by steaming, simmering, etc., is a
    > sacrilege. I'd rather do without than eat that crap.
    >
    > Wayne

    Yum! That's dish from my Pennsylvania Dutch childhood that
    I haven't had in ages. The smell of that casserole with
    the ribs (sometimes pork chops) and knockwurst bubbling in
    the sauerkraut is pure ambrosia. It ain't Q but it *is*
    way yummy.

    JD
     
  14. "JD" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Yep, spareribs and sauerkraut! Any attempt at making
    >> "barbequed" spareribs by steaming, simmering, etc., is a
    >> sacrilege. I'd rather do without than eat that crap.
    >>
    >> Wayne
    >
    >Yum! That's dish from my Pennsylvania Dutch childhood that
    >I haven't had in ages. The smell of that casserole with
    >the ribs (sometimes pork chops) and knockwurst bubbling in
    >the sauerkraut is pure ambrosia. It ain't Q but it *is*
    >way yummy.
    >
    >JD

    I was fed the same thing way back when I was a kid, it was
    served in a layer - mashed potatoes on the bottom, kraut in
    the middle and a scoop of cottage cheese on the top. The
    chops or ribs would be on the side.Ummm ummm.

    --
    "A Sound Mind. A Healthy Body. Pick One" Mr. Hedge
     
  15. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 17:59:20 GMT, "JD" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Yum! That's dish from my Pennsylvania Dutch childhood that
    >I haven't had in ages. The smell of that casserole with
    >the ribs (sometimes pork chops) and knockwurst bubbling in
    >the sauerkraut is pure ambrosia. It ain't Q but it *is*
    >way yummy.

    Thats what I'm doing tomorrow. A bone-in pork loin (country
    rib-style) and two links of thick kielbasa in a quart of
    sauerkraut (in a dutch oven in a low oven for 2-3 hours)
    with crispy German potato pancakes on the side (sour cream -
    no applesauce for me)

    -sw (From Altoona, Harrisburgh, and Pittsburgh)
     
  16. On Sun, 14 Mar 2004 21:04:59 -0800, Justice Gustine wrote:

    > - ... mashed potatoes on the bottom, kraut in the middle
    > and a scoop of cottage cheese on the top ...

    And people complain about British food ...
    --
    Tim.

    If the human brain were simple enough that we could
    understand it, we would be so simple that we couldn't.
     
  17. lvirden

    lvirden Guest

    According to John Gaughan <[email protected]>:
    :I would bake or broil ribs [...] . The
    :vast majority of stoves (including mine) also have ovens and broilers,
    :which are much better than stovetops for cooking big hunks of meat
    :(ribs, roasts, loins, etc).

    Would you be willing to go through the steps you would use
    to bake or broil racks of ribs? A charcoal grill isn't
    typically something to which I have access.

    I've seen many shows where people are using some sort of rub
    on the ribs. I get the idea that each rub is different - and
    appears to consist of some combination of salt, chili
    powder, etc.

    Any suggestions?

    --
    <URL: http://wiki.tcl.tk/ > In God we trust. Even if
    explicitly stated to the contrary, nothing in this posting
    should be construed as representing my employer's opinions.
    <URL: mailto:[email protected] > <URL:
    http://www.purl.org/NET/lvirden/
     
  18. Bubbabob

    Bubbabob Guest

    "Ray Gordon" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > If all you have is a stovetop and 90 minutes to work with,
    > could you do better?
    >
    >
    >

    I'd cook something I had the equipment and time for, rather
    than ruining perfectly good ribs with this hideous process
    (I hesitate to call it a recipe) of yours.
     
  19. A.C.

    A.C. Guest

    > :I would bake or broil ribs [...] . The
    > :vast majority of stoves (including mine) also have ovens and broilers,
    > :which are much better than stovetops for cooking big hunks of meat
    > :(ribs, roasts, loins, etc).
    >
    >
    > Would you be willing to go through the steps you would use
    > to bake or broil racks of ribs? A charcoal grill isn't
    > typically something to which I have access.
    >
    > I've seen many shows where people are using some sort of
    > rub on the ribs. I get the idea that each rub is different
    > - and appears to consist of some combination of salt,
    > chili powder, etc.
    >
    > Any suggestions?

    i usually take the rack of ribs, season them with what ever
    you want, wrap them in heavy duty aluminum foil and bake
    them in the oven @250f for about 3 hours.(be sure to leave
    some space in the foil for the liquid that will accumulate)
    take them out of the foil and slather them with you favorite
    bbq sauce. raise the temperature of the oven to 375f and
    cook until the bbq sauce glazes the ribs. mmmmm tender juicy
    and tasty ribs.

    ac
     
  20. "A.C." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > :I would bake or broil ribs [...] . The :vast majority
    > > of stoves (including mine) also have ovens and broilers,
    > > :which are much better than stovetops for cooking big
    > > hunks of meat
    > > :(ribs, roasts, loins, etc).
    > >
    > >
    > > Would you be willing to go through the steps you would
    > > use to bake or broil racks of ribs? A charcoal grill
    > > isn't typically something to which I have access.
    > >
    > > I've seen many shows where people are using some sort of
    > > rub on the ribs. I get the idea that each rub is
    > > different - and appears to
    consist
    > > of some combination of salt, chili powder, etc.
    > >
    > > Any suggestions?
    >
    > i usually take the rack of ribs, season them with what
    > ever you want, wrap them in heavy duty aluminum foil and
    > bake them in the oven @250f for about
    3
    > hours.(be sure to leave some space in the foil for the
    > liquid that will accumulate) take them out of the foil and
    > slather them with you favorite
    bbq
    > sauce. raise the temperature of the oven to 375f and cook
    > until the bbq sauce glazes the ribs. mmmmm tender juicy
    > and tasty ribs.
    >
    > ac
    >

    You have, in a nutshell, described the typical New England
    BBQ Joint.

    Jack Ersatz
     
Loading...