recipes that don't use specified ingredients

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Ben, Mar 9, 2004.

  1. Ben

    Ben Guest

    I have this cookbook that for the second time I noticed
    listed an ingredient and didn't use it. I followed a pastry
    recipe requiring 2 eggs and the instructions say explicitly
    to use 1 egg yolk and doesn't mention eggs again. It also
    mentions 1 teaspoon of water and doesn't use that either.

    btw. the recipe called for margarine, flour salt, ice water,
    vinegar, 2 egg yolks, 1 tsp water and optional sesame seeds.

    I have the dough in the fridge for 2 hours right now as it
    specified (is that really necessary? - I'm impatient). Aside
    from ingredients that aren't used (in 2 cases) I really like
    the cookbook.

    regards, Ben

    --
    "What passes for wisdom may only be eloquent foolishness"

    Cheap long distance calling using Onesuite
    (http://www.onesuite.com).
    2.5 cents/min anywhere in the U.S., to Canada or the U.K. No
    monthly or connection fees! Use promotional code 038664643
    for 20 free minutes.
     
    Tags:


  2. Misnomer

    Misnomer Guest

    Juding from the order.... the 1 egg yolk , 1 tsp water and
    optional sesame seeds are the egg wash for the top crust....

    just a guess.

    take care Liz

    Hey! Look what ben <[email protected]> wrote :

    >I have this cookbook that for the second time I noticed
    >listed an ingredient and didn't use it. I followed a pastry
    >recipe requiring 2 eggs and the instructions say explicitly
    >to use 1 egg yolk and doesn't mention eggs again. It also
    >mentions 1 teaspoon of water and doesn't use that either.
    >
    >btw. the recipe called for margarine, flour salt, ice
    >water, vinegar, 2 egg yolks, 1 tsp water and optional
    >sesame seeds.
    >
    >I have the dough in the fridge for 2 hours right now as it
    >specified (is that really necessary? - I'm impatient).
    >Aside from ingredients that aren't used (in 2 cases) I
    >really like the cookbook.
    >
    >regards, Ben
     
  3. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    in article [email protected], ben at [email protected]
    wrote on 3/8/04 5:38 PM:

    > I have this cookbook that for the second time I noticed
    > listed an ingredient and didn't use it. I followed a
    > pastry recipe requiring 2 eggs and the instructions say
    > explicitly to use 1 egg yolk and doesn't mention eggs
    > again. It also mentions 1 teaspoon of water and doesn't
    > use that either.
    >
    > btw. the recipe called for margarine, flour salt, ice
    > water, vinegar, 2 egg yolks, 1 tsp water and optional
    > sesame seeds.

    Sounds like egg wash for the top of the pastry. The seeds
    are for decoration.

    >
    > I have the dough in the fridge for 2 hours right now as it
    > specified (is that really necessary? - I'm impatient).

    Yes, it's really necessary. It's called a resting period. It
    lets the gluten in the pastry relax so you can roll it out
    without struggling with the dough. If you don't let the
    gluten relax, the dough will "fight" being rolled out. It
    won't stretch out, it will snap back.

    A good cookbook will tell you not only WHAT to do, but WHY,
    so that you learn something.

    > Aside from ingredients that aren't used (in 2 cases) I
    > really like the cookbook.

    It sounds like a sloppy editing job.
     
  4. Sf

    Sf Guest

    Fire the editors.

    ``````````````

    On Mon, 08 Mar 2004 17:38:52 -0500, ben <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have this cookbook that for the second time I noticed
    > listed an ingredient and didn't use it. I followed a
    > pastry recipe requiring 2 eggs and the instructions say
    > explicitly to use 1 egg yolk and doesn't mention eggs
    > again. It also mentions 1 teaspoon of water and doesn't
    > use that either.
    >
    > btw. the recipe called for margarine, flour salt, ice
    > water, vinegar, 2 egg yolks, 1 tsp water and optional
    > sesame seeds.
    >
    > I have the dough in the fridge for 2 hours right now as
    > it specified (is that really necessary? - I'm impatient).
    > Aside from ingredients that aren't used (in 2 cases) I
    > really like the cookbook.
    >
    > regards, Ben

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  5. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Sheryl Rosen wrote:

    > A good cookbook will tell you not only WHAT to do, but
    > WHY, so that you learn something.

    Amen.

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot)
    com
     
  6. Ben

    Ben Guest

    Sheryl Rosen wrote:

    > in article [email protected],
    > ben at [email protected] wrote on 3/8/04 5:38 PM:
    >
    >>I have this cookbook that for the second time I noticed
    >>listed an ingredient and didn't use it. I followed a
    >>pastry recipe requiring 2 eggs and the instructions say
    >>explicitly to use 1 egg yolk and doesn't mention eggs
    >>again. It also mentions 1 teaspoon of water and doesn't
    >>use that either.
    >>
    >>btw. the recipe called for margarine, flour salt, ice
    >>water, vinegar, 2 egg yolks, 1 tsp water and optional
    >>sesame seeds.
    >
    > Sounds like egg wash for the top of the pastry. The seeds
    > are for decoration.

    Hey, I think you're right there!

    > A good cookbook will tell you not only WHAT to do, but
    > WHY, so that you learn something.

    This book is very dry bones in that it has the recipes and
    basic instructions and no pictures at all. Though, the few
    recipes I have made from it have worked out very nicely. I
    bought another cookbook recently that goes into explanations
    for things though I don't like its recipes. Either I can't
    figure out what to substitute for various ingredients that I
    don't have or can't use (like milk based ones etc.) or the
    recipe is more complicated and drawn out than I'd like (I
    only have so much time to spend on making dinner for the
    family). Also with the exception of these franks in a
    blanket, I generally like to make food which is more health
    conscious.

    regards, Ben

    --
    "What passes for wisdom may only be eloquent foolishness"

    Cheap long distance calling using Onesuite
    (http://www.onesuite.com).
    2.5 cents/min anywhere in the U.S., to Canada or the U.K. No
    monthly or connection fees! Use promotional code 038664643
    for 20 free minutes.
     
Loading...