Recommend cycling daypack

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Jeff, May 3, 2003.

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  1. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    I'm looking for a well made cycling daypack - like a small knapsack with two shoulder straps and a
    waist strap, to keep it from swinging back and forth. I don't need a hydration system pack, or
    anything technical. It's for bike commuting to work. Any specific suggestions for something well
    made? Thanks in advance. Jeff

    for personal replies, email to jeffp at "en why see" dot "ar ar" dot com
     
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  2. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Sat, 03 May 2003 14:58:35 GMT, jeff <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm looking for a well made cycling daypack - like a small knapsack with two shoulder straps and a
    >waist strap, to keep it from swinging back and forth. I don't need a hydration system pack, or
    >anything technical. It's for bike commuting to work. Any specific suggestions for something well
    >made? Thanks in advance. Jeff
    >
    >
    >
    >for personal replies, email to jeffp at "en why see" dot "ar ar" dot com

    I bought a North Face 'Big Shot' pack a couple of years ago at a sale at an outlet store. Cost $35
    or so. Nice padding on the straps, slim profile, and holds tons if I want it to. Compresses smaller
    when I don't need the room. Waist belt/strap is simple, but works when I need it to keep the pack
    from swaying on hills, etc.

    It sits flat against the back, so sweat and cooling are problems. I use it for short commuting- 4
    miles- and trips up to 20 miles with lots of starts and stops. I don't find cooling to be a problem,
    but on a steady ride of fifteen miles or more I wouldn't use this pack, or this style.

    I tried a couple of Vaude packs in a store and they felt very comfortable. They have a suspension
    system that gets the pack off of the back for cooling. If I was going to replace the 'Big Shot,' I'd
    give the Vaudes a real hard look. Construction and design seemed very solid. Feedback from others
    seems positive.

    http://www.mtbreview.com/reviews/bags/product_86644.shtml

    http://www.mtbreview.com/reviews/bags/
     
  3. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "jeff" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm looking for a well made cycling daypack - like a small knapsack with two shoulder straps and a
    > waist strap, to keep it from swinging back and forth. I don't need a hydration system pack, or
    > anything technical. It's for bike commuting to work. Any specific suggestions for something well
    > made? Thanks in advance. Jeff

    I always recommend my favorite pack by Vaude.

    http://www.vaude.com/packs/packs_main.cfm?subcatagory=Daypacks

    This pack creates an air space between you and the pack which greatly helps in keeping you cool.
    I've put many, many miles on the bike with this pack loaded with books during the summer. There is
    just no comparison in comfort. I went through three packs before I found this one and haven't looked
    back since.

    -Buck
     
  4. jeff <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm looking for a well made cycling daypack - like a small knapsack with two shoulder straps and a
    > waist strap, to keep it from swinging back and forth. I don't need a hydration system pack, or
    > anything technical. It's for bike commuting to work. Any specific suggestions for something well
    > made? Thanks in advance. Jeff
    >

    I use a Timbuk2 DeeDog messenger bag. Air circulation a possible problem, but it's watertight (not
    even english rain has seeped into it, once I've closed it nicely), comfy on the bike, and carries
    loads when I have to haul stuff (big A4 lever arch files, f'rinstance)

    I picked one up at a good price ; a store near me had a few on sale at biggish discount. So far a
    good value, even if it makes me "look like the ammunition-carrier for a recoilless rifle battery,"
    according to my Dad--but that might just have been the colours: OD/khaki/OD.

    -Luigi
     
  5. Matthew Reed

    Matthew Reed Guest

    Jeff Of packs I have seen, Bailey Works makes the best packs for riding (www.baileyworks.com) , both
    messanger style and traditional two shoulder jobs. I strongly suggest a messanger bag because it
    gives you a much lower center of gravity. Also, a full back pack can bump against your helmet, knock
    it forward, screw up your visability and make you hit a large rock while you are descending a steep
    mountain trail on your way home from an overnight. You will then crash, and fall on your face with
    the backpack resting on your head because you loosened the waste strap to try to keep the bag low
    while you stood on the pedals which allowed the whole pack to fly up like a hockey sweater during a
    third period 4-0 blowout in an AHL game. Blinded by your helmet and wedged against a scrub oak, you
    will need a friend to help dislodge you, but he can't help because he is laughing too hard.

    Eventually, you will crawl from under the pack and helmet and notice that your own pedals have
    turned on you and left a large gash in your shin. Your friend will make sure you have not
    severed and artery before he starts laughing agian. You will then take off your helmet, strap it
    to your pack and very carefully ride home where you will get no sympathy from your girlfriend
    because she has a large Bailey Works messanger bag, offered to loan it to you, but you wanted to
    use your own stuff.

    Of course, you might say, "It is just for my commute, I am not worried about descending some stupid
    trail after an overnight."

    My reply would be, "Ok, I suppose you are right, but I do suggest a messanger bag anyway because
    they work well. People who haul stuff on bikes for a living use them for a reason."

    You say, "Yeah guys who ride bikes without brakes and freewheels."

    I say, "Well, I am not sure why they do that, but I still like their bags."

    Matt

    "jeff" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm looking for a well made cycling daypack - like a small knapsack with two shoulder straps and a
    > waist strap, to keep it from swinging back and forth. I don't need a hydration system pack, or
    > anything technical. It's for bike commuting to work. Any specific suggestions for something well
    > made? Thanks in advance. Jeff
    >
    >
    >
    > for personal replies, email to jeffp at "en why see" dot "ar ar" dot com
     
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