Recommendations For Carbon Fiber Bicycle

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by bikeman1, Nov 4, 2015.

  1. bikeman1

    bikeman1 New Member

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    Welcome to visit our official carbon fiber bicycle websites,here you can find large numbers of delicate carbon bicycle,which includes Road bikes,MTB bikes and Competitive bicycles as well.Most of the products in our store are made from full carbon,which owes the best tecnology all over the world,so you deserve to have a try.Except the finished bicycles we provide,here we also provide many kinds of accessories of carbon fiber bikes,accordingly,we can provide customized only the customes like.So you can bold imagination,let your dream of owning a favorite carbon fiber bicycle come ture.So what are you waiting for,no hesitation,just go for it,here we can bring you much suprise!
     
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  2. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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  3. mpre53

    mpre53 Well-Known Member

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    No tickee, no shirtee.
     
  4. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Personally I would never own a CF bike, but like all LBS's they got to sell the latest bandwagon mentality to stay profitable. But with most CF now coming out of China I just can't trust what they make far enough to buy one, then on top of all of that I have issues with China's governmental policies so I try my best not to buy stuff made in China, though admittedly that is today impossible, but if I a choice it won't be a Chinese product.

    Steel is stronger and lighter than ever plus it excels in comfort. The biggest argument that people come up with against steel is simply weight, well the average steel bikes today weigh just 18 pounds, there is one brand that makes a 14 pounder but that one is expensive, while the average carbon bikes weigh 17.5 pounds. Here's an example, the Colnago Master X light steel frame weighs just 3.52 pounds while the Colnago C40 weighs 3.09 pounds, so there isn't any weight advantage when you look at real numbers.
     
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  5. mpre53

    mpre53 Well-Known Member

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    You know there's a difference between Taiwan and the ChiComs, right? ;)
     
  6. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    That's what my friend said when he bought his steel De Rosa! :lol:

    200 lb rider killed it after 2 years. :angry:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Damn! Holy Seat Tube Failure, Batman! Make it into a lamp!

    I've cracked the Colnago right rear dropout on a Eyetalian Colnago steelie and I've cracked a chicom-made Wilier Izoard XP carbon wonder. I've busted a Campy alloy Record crank arm plum in two pieces. The Eyetalians and the chicoms both gave me freebie replacement stuff for being their Beta testers.

    Any and all of it can and will fail given sufficient use and/or abuse.

    I love steel frames, but I'll never go back. Probably never...unless significant advances in material science is made...SOON! I'm old already!

    Those 14 pound stainless/heat treated TIG-welded wonders? They're MORE fragile than most CF 10 pound bikes like the Emonda 10. They dent just looking at their paper thin walls and cracking and catastrophic tube failures that make Mr. B's pic look mild is the norm. They have a limited life span when used as daily drivers. Repairable! Not so much. The certified builder has one shot at getting the initial weld right and after that? Nice lamp you got there...
     
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  8. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Yes, but I don't recall mentioning Taiwan in my post, can you show me where I did?
     
  9. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    That's not good! I have a friend who weighed 240 was a pro body builder and he use to break frames down on the bottom bracket too, but I think his all broke where the chainstays go into the BB. He had some older steel bike he got new in the late 70's but broke it so he tried a Vitus and went through 2 of those in 6 months, he got a third one (all replaced under warranty) but he never rode and just stored it, then he tried a Klein and broke 2 of those over the course of 2 or 3 years, then he tried Cannondales and broke those too. By this time Rivendell came along and he contacted Grant and told him his problem with frames and wanted a frame that would last plus take the weight of touring, so Grant had one built and my friend has been riding that Rivendell for 13 or 14 years touring all over the US with no problems.

    Some of the new steel is strong but it's also brittle, but something like what you show shouldn't be happening, the only way that happened is due to incompetent welder who brazed at too high of a temperature which caused excessive heating of the tube, this is why with lug construction that silver brazing is the best because it's done at lower temperature and thus no worry about heat damaging the tube, whereas a lot of companies today only use brass to braze the lugs with and brass requires a higher temperature but brass is cheaper. This is the only thing I can think of as to what happened to that frame because it's located so close to the lug.
     
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  10. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    I worried about carbon for big guys after reading all the forum poo poo! They all said aluminum was the way to go for Clydes. I've snapped 2 alum frames after only 13,000 miles.

    Now I am on full carbon thanks to free upgrades and warranties. I have about 11,000 miles on the carbon frame so we will see. Can't say I am worried about it being durable. Seems stiffer and stronger than the alum felt under me.

    I will say I am glad I did not pay for the full carbon cause it ain't all the smooth as silk poo poo I read on the forums. One of my other partial alum bikes was a much better ride. B)
     
  11. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    And after searching like crazy on the internet I couldn't find one Rodrigues Outlaw report of their frame breaking and a complete bike is only 14 pounds, maybe you can search and see if you find an incident of a Rodrigues frame failing. But those bikes are expensive, I would love to ride one just see what they're about, but it doesn't make sense for me to buy one.
     
  12. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Quote by Froze:
    "I couldn't find one Rodrigues Outlaw report of their frame breaking..."

    That's an enviable record, if true. I see he uses TT tubes. Reynolds and Columbus heat treated stuff, the record is clear. Rodriguez also builds some nice tandems. I looked at one of his tandem frames and it was really nicely done. A full 5 to 6 pounds lighter than my Santana aluminum. (of course he uses Ultegra or Campy Record single road brakes, no drum, no disc on the light weight rigs).

    Still, lightweight, thin wall, heat treated steel is as prone to denting/beer canning as carbon is to cracking. The old stuff...you could iron the wrinkles and dents out. The ultra-weight weenie steels? No way.
     
  13. mpre53

    mpre53 Well-Known Member

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    I had a seat tube crack on a GT aluminum frame at less than 4000 miles. And I weighed a whopping 155 at the time.
     
  14. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    Yo probably recognize the name OCRRrick. The guy that does all the double centuries from the 50+ forum. He used to ride a titanium GT frame when we rode together back in 2003'ish. The down tube cracked on him and I think he was about 155 at the time. :eek:
     
  15. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    I dunno what type of Ti tubing GT used on that frame, but a LOT of Ti tubing is seamed/welded. A notch above gas pipe, but nothing special. Add in hydroforming and undercutting weld margins in finishing and the miracle metal doesn't hold up much better that steel, aluminum or carbon...sometimes.

    Overall, I like Ti for durability, but you do have to throw shape, material or geometry at it to get it stiff enough to suit me.

    I don't think there's a real magic in any material frames and forks are made of. It's all uber light weight racing bikes in my world and from Scandium to Magnesium to the various aluminum and steel alloys to the 'hunnert ton' Toray carbon it all breaks and cracks and pulls apart. And even if it does last long enough to become your favorite bestest riding lover and friend...that's when you overcook that fast right-hander and drill it into the side of a parked school bus.

    Time to go shopping and the ad men have all got a new siren song to sing to us.
     
  16. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    On that note, look for a bike with strong warranty, and service to back it up. That is, some warranties look good on paper, but f the factory is overseas and the district rep is AWOL, it can be a problem.

    In general, the service on US brands--Trek, Specialized, Scott, Cannondale, Felt, etc.--is strong. I'd include Raleigh but I don't know where they stand on carbon frames this year. Also, the unabashedly Chinese brand, Giant, is good. Colnagos and Pinarellos are heavenly rides, I hear, but I don't know where they stand on warranty.
     
  17. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Exactly. My local TREK dealer has a bunch of cut up carbon frames in the back room.

    This is indicative of two things:
    1. TREK carbon fails with the best of them.
    2. TREK replaces the failed product in many cases.

    Before buying, READ the warranty and discuss it with the re-seller. If you expect to be taken care of in the case of product failure and get the vibe that the dealer or the manufacturer or the online re-seller is not 100% on board with that...move on to the next brand/dealer.
     
  18. igasmurfa

    igasmurfa New Member

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    I don't think "delicate" is the right word you are looking for there. Light? Sure! But not "delicate". I really don't trust my butt on anything that would fall to pieces while I am screaming downhill. I know CF can be really robust so I would have no problem riding one, but not if it's advertised as "delicate".
     
  19. mpre53

    mpre53 Well-Known Member

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    Trek's got a great reputation for warranty replacements.

    Nobody advertises CF as "delicate". :D
     
  20. igasmurfa

    igasmurfa New Member

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    Oh I agree completely, which is why I thought OP might have confused that word for a different meaning. But I would nab a CF bike if they weren't so expensive. Lighter=gooded
     
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