Recommended Wheelsets?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by HyperPhreak, May 14, 2005.

  1. nojiri

    nojiri New Member

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    Hey wilmar13, thanks for the comments. I'm always eager to learn, so please offer your opinions. 2 quick questions:
    1) What is the ideal weight and/or weight distribution of a climbing wheel, and why?
    If by chance that is not a valid question:
    2) Does weight and/or weight distribution of a climbing wheel make absolutely no practical difference, and why?
    Thanks,
    Nojiri
     


  2. wilmar13

    wilmar13 New Member

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    I don't know what the ideal weight distribution of a wheel is as there are many parameters you will want to optimize first. The problem is that the whole claim of reducing rotational weight making a difference is dependent on actually being able to accelerate the wheel (in terms of radial acceleration) which you just can't do on a bicycle (most of the little power you can create is sapped by either air resistance or fighting gravity). It makes such a tiny, IMO negligible, difference even in competition that it can be forgotten about. Weight does matter, just not where it happens to fall on the wheel all other things being equal (again, inertia technically matters but it makes almost no difference).

    Check out these resources for a much better overview than I could ever provide:
    http://www.biketechreview.com/archive/wheel_theory.htm
    http://www.analyticcycling.com/WheelsConcept_Page.html (and play with the tools under various scenarios to get a better idea of the effects of all the variables)
     
  3. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    And more money for beer. ;)
     
  4. JohnO

    JohnO New Member

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    I go by what experience tells me. Personal experience has been that good tubies, say Conti Sprinters, pumped up to 150psi, seem to roll easier than the typical lightweight clincher pumped up to 80-90. Are we talking theoretical, or real world circumstances?

     
  5. wilmar13

    wilmar13 New Member

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    I see two things you are implying (or rather I am interpreting :D ) that I would want to slightly disagree with. First, higher pressure is better for rolling resistance, this is only true on a perfect surface, and unless you ride on an indoor track you deal with road imperfections which makes a lower pressure of say 110-120 actually faster (I used to ride on 20's pumped up to 160 and was convinced by all the road imperfections I felt that they were much faster...doh! :eek: ). The second is that when comparing tubulars to clinchers you need to compare tires with a similar casing. I totally agree with you that a Conti Sprinter at 150PSI will be a faster, better tire, with more grip, less rolling resistance, better ride, etc. than a mediocre clincher. But if you compare a high end clincher with a supple casing the advantage goes away. About the only real advantage a tubular has over a clincher anymore is weight savings (especially with Zipp rims), but the disadvantages never went away (the losses from tufo tape are worse than glue). I have a set of tubular race wheels but a set of Vitoria Evo CX clinchers ride just as well on my trainers. And yes I am talking about real world here. Many Pros even race on clinchers and they don't have to deal with any of the disadvantages those of us without mechanics deal with. Here is a link, I am sure others can post more about the PSI issue:

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/brandt/rolling-resistance-tubular.html
     
  6. JohnO

    JohnO New Member

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    Okay, I guess I ride smoother roads than most people. My typical venue is the backroads around the horse farms in central KY, USA, where they keep the roads in very good condition - don't want a million dollar racehorse getting rattled about on the transporter. On these roads, high pressure translates into fast speed. There are a very few sections of rough pavement where it seems the tubies might slow down a bit quicker than a lower pressure clincher, but for the most part, the Sprinters definitely exhibit more speed than my best clincher set - Open Corsa CX's on Rolf Vector Pro rims, no slouch there. So I supppose tire preference is determined as much by riding location as anything.

    The old Tubasti glue was great for practical jokes. Back in college, we treated an obnoxious fraternity's toilet seats early one morning... because the glue was white, it really wasn't noticable... until you tried to get up...

     
  7. wilmar13

    wilmar13 New Member

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    LOL... so did it stick well enough to wax their ass, or you don't know ;)
     
  8. HyperPhreak

    HyperPhreak New Member

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    alright thanks everyone for the replies and the help. I appreciate it.
     
  9. mitosis

    mitosis New Member

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    I have to vouch for Open Pros too. I've got a pair I bought second hand. I have done maybe 40,000 k's over 10 years of training on rugged roads as well as some tough road races. They have DA hubs and are still straight and true.

    Like you say, not aero, no bling but certainly reliable. ;)
     
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