recumbent advice for a newbie

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Attcbf, Feb 13, 2004.

  1. Attcbf

    Attcbf Guest

    I am coming out of lurkdom to ask a couple of questions. My dear hubby and I are going down to
    Phoenix this coming weekend to hopefully buy a recumbent. Sadly there are no dealers here in Las
    Vegas and since we are venturing into a new territory going with a bent, we want to be able to ride
    and compare various models.

    My first question has to do with weight. My husband is obese and beginning to have health problems
    as a result. He is 5'7 and weighs 260 pounds, which is more than the stats on a number of recumbent
    bikes. How do we know the bike will be able to handle his weight (which we hope will be reduced as
    he gets in better shape)?

    Next, does anyone have any strong opinions of models to stay away from, and why. My husband's riding
    will probably be confined to day and possibly short weekend trips due to his job and (for now)
    condition. Locally, this means mostly city riding. Las Vegas is very hilly, which is also a factor.

    Lauriann ~newbie
     
    Tags:


  2. I can talk a bit to the weight. Most recumbents will handle your husbands weight. I'm right around
    that weight and have had no problems with any bike I've owned. Ones that may pose a weight
    restriction are the high preformance designs and that is probably due more to the wheels than to the
    frame. I currently ride a Bacchetta Giro and own a Rans Vrex and a ez-1, I started on a BikeE CT. At
    that weight I would probably stay away from a bike with a suspension however. At that weight
    suspensions are just about at their useful range. Its just one more thing to worry about too. Many
    on this newsgroup are Clydesdalesin the mid 200 pound range. Have fun in the hunt and more fun when
    you get your rides Denny in Sayre, Pa "Bent but not Broken"

    "attcbf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I> My first question has to do with weight. My husband is obese and
    > beginning to have health problems as a result. He is 5'7 and weighs 260 pounds, which is more
    > than the stats on a number of recumbent bikes. How do we know the bike will be able to handle
    > his weight
     
  3. Howdy Lauriann!

    First, welcome to the world of recumbents! I hope you stay a spell!

    Denny is right in that most recumbents can handle that weight. For your hubby, I'd recommend the
    same bike that a friend of mine is getting; an EZ-1 SC. My friend is just under 6' in height and
    weighs well over 300 lbs. You may want to ask the dealer about some different tires, but that's
    where I'd start.

    Let me add this though: The above mentioned bike is a great bike IF your hubby wants to start on two
    wheels. If he doesn't, I'd recommend the EZ-3 trike to him. My friend rode that as well and
    considered it, but he really wanted two wheels.

    You can see the EZ-1 SC here. http://www.easyracers.com/ez_1_sc.htm

    You can see the EZ-3 Trike here. http://www.easyracers.com/ez_3.htm

    Good luck to both of you! Recumbenting has been so good for my family and I; we're healthier and
    better to each other as a result of getting 'bent. I ride, my wife rides, and my youngest daughter
    rides. My oldest daughter ride now and again, but we've not converted her to the 'bent side yet...
    (We're working on her!)

    --
    "Sea" ya!
    --Lars S. Mulford
    "You can find evil anywhere you look.
    The question is, why are you looking?"
    "attcbf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am coming out of lurkdom to ask a couple of questions. My dear
    > hubby and I are going down to Phoenix this coming weekend to hopefully
    > buy a recumbent. Sadly there are no dealers here in Las Vegas and
    > since we are venturing into a new territory going with a bent, we want
    > to be able to ride and compare various models.
    >
    > My first question has to do with weight. My husband is obese and
    > beginning to have health problems as a result. He is 5'7 and weighs
    > 260 pounds, which is more than the stats on a number of recumbent
    > bikes. How do we know the bike will be able to handle his weight
    > (which we hope will be reduced as he gets in better shape)?
    >
    > Next, does anyone have any strong opinions of models to stay away
    > from, and why. My husband's riding will probably be confined to day
    > and possibly short weekend trips due to his job and (for now)
    > condition. Locally, this means mostly city riding. Las Vegas is very
    > hilly, which is also a factor.
    >
    > Lauriann ~newbie
     
  4. Floridabent

    Floridabent Guest

    Lauriann: I'll second that recommendation on the EZ SC-1. I started on one at 260 and it has
    presented no problem.

    A thought: go to www.hostelshoppe.com and look at the specs on any bike that looks interesting to
    him. Most if not all have maximum recommended weights, though there is a built-in safety factor.

    For instance, the SC-1 and several others list a max of 275, but as Lars noted, a 300-pounder was
    comfortable. You will find some bikes that recommend a max of 225, but they would probably hold up
    well under a 260-pounder.

    Let a bike shop be your guide. Sure, they want to sell the bikes, and the ones they have in stock,
    but they don't want someone coming back to them (or posting here) about bad advice and selection
    based on a too-light bike for a too-heavy rider.

    Good luck.

    Bill, riding bent in Florida (hence the screen name) To e-mail, remove undies
     
  5. bentcruiser

    bentcruiser New Member

    Joined:
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    Very good and close to home. I am 5'11' but I weighed 260 or so when I first started recumbents. But I have an issue still. I exercised like crazy on the bent and after 4 or 5 years of riding one guess what? I am still 260.

    My doctor told me I am bulking up. I am visibly slimmer but my fat has turned to muscle. Muscle mass weighs more than fat mass. He contends the muscle weight is good weight to have. Overweight pertains to fat weight he said. Muscle is different.

    So though the scale says 260, I am in a much healtier position now.

    As far as bikes, I ride a Burley Canto that is a dream to ride. There are several great bikes out there for heavier types. Lightfoot Cycles makes good models as do others. Maybe an EZ Sport is a good way to go.

    Try as many as you can, though.
     
  6. Wheel Doctor

    Wheel Doctor Guest

    Welcome...I will ditto what Denny said. My advise is to ride a few and start with an EZ-1. The EZ-1
    is a geta acquainted recumbent. I have three at my shop here in MD that I have new to bent customers
    tool around on. After 10 or 15 minutes they graduate and may try a Bacchetta Giro or a RANS. Or they
    love the EZ and leave with one. The three EZ loaners I have were trade ups after 6 mos to a year of
    use. I sold a Giro to a 270lb man last year. I replaced the stock wheels with upgrade heavy duty
    ones at a minimal cost. Something to think about. Good hunting.

    Jude

    "attcbf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am coming out of lurkdom to ask a couple of questions. My dear hubby and I are going down to
    > Phoenix this coming weekend to hopefully buy a recumbent. Sadly there are no dealers here in Las
    > Vegas and since we are venturing into a new territory going with a bent, we want to be able to
    > ride and compare various models.
    >
    > My first question has to do with weight. My husband is obese and beginning to have health problems
    > as a result. He is 5'7 and weighs 260 pounds, which is more than the stats on a number of
    > recumbent bikes. How do we know the bike will be able to handle his weight (which we hope will be
    > reduced as he gets in better shape)?
    >
    > Next, does anyone have any strong opinions of models to stay away from, and why. My husband's
    > riding will probably be confined to day and possibly short weekend trips due to his job and
    > (for now) condition. Locally, this means mostly city riding. Las Vegas is very hilly, which is
    > also a factor.
    >
    > Lauriann ~newbie
     
  7. bikeman07

    bikeman07 Guest

    On 12 Feb 2004 21:42:32 -0800, [email protected] (attcbf) wrote:

    we want
    >to be able to ride and compare various models. He is 5'7 and weighs 260 pounds, which is more than
    >the stats on a number of recumbent bikes. Next, does anyone have any strong opinions of models to
    >stay away from, and why. Lauriann ~newbie
    As others have said, welcome to a slightly 'bent life! The Sun EZ models are great to start with if
    you want a long wheelbase model. They are probably easiest to learn on, especially for a heavier
    person (I am now 265, down from 285 when I got my EZ-Sport). I found the long wheelbase easiest to
    steer, and easier to start. I found a short wheelbase to be too unstable at the very slow speed that
    I could start from. I was also less flexible than I am now, so I had a more difficult time actually
    mounting the short wheelbase bike - in one case the tube was so high that when I tilted it to get my
    leg over, my thigh came down on the chain idler-pulley mounting bracket. I got the largest bullseye
    bruise of my life! Ride as many different styles as possible, and adjust the seat incline up and
    down - some people do not like the more laid back position of some 'bents. Your results may vary.

    Dan
     
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