Recumbent Bicycles And Arthritis

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by srock, Jul 14, 2015.

  1. srock

    srock New Member

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    Hello recumbent bikers,

    My mother suffers from arthritis in her wrists but would like to cycle so I suggested a recumbent bicycle. I ride a road bike for commuting, exercise and pleasure. So I don't know much about recumbent bicycles. Is there any reason that a recumbent bike would not work for someone with wrist pain? What are the lighter models that would be easier for her to handle?

    Thanks for your advice!
     
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  2. joshposh

    joshposh Banned

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    I always thought that a recumbent bike was geared more for people with back problems, so they can sit further in and more comfortably in a formed seat. But I think that it could be an answer to your problem. It does alleviate a lot of stress off of the wrist. Getting on and off would be the only strain on her arms. So yeah, it could work.
     
  3. Ivan23

    Ivan23 New Member

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    Oh, I am so sorry to know about your mother’s arthritis. Its pain is the worst that I have gone through. But I got treated with acupuncture. My cousin is the acupuncturist at acupuncture lorne park clinic and she did my treatment.
     
  4. delmars

    delmars New Member

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    Related to this, I have RSSI and hand numbness has been an issue from resting on the handlebars. I'm curious if other riders with RSSI problems found switching to a recumbent helped with this kind of issue?
     
  5. rangerbentman

    rangerbentman Banned

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    On a recumbent bike you are no longer holding body weight on your arms , wrists, or hands. Your back is cradled in a comfortable backrest and while you may get sore muscles you won't get any pains. There is an un-learning curve to to go through as you no longer use your handlebars for anything other than something to hold onto lightly.
     
  6. Corzhens

    Corzhens Active Member

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    From what I know, arthritics should also have regular physical activities and biking may be one of those perferred activities. Speaking of wrists, I don't think the type of bike is that relevant because what's important in the wrist movement is the steering and all bikes have the handlebar for steering. But with the pains, I cannot comment on that because some people have a low threshold of pain.
     
  7. rangerbentman

    rangerbentman Banned

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    Oddly enough if you can find a Rans Wave or Tailwind ( both are out of production ) which are relatively cheap you will find that they are very comfortable with the only downside being tired muscles at the end of a ride. Lighter does not mean much if you are not enthusiastic to ride it. Both of these recumbents are putting you in a more upright position with your arms out on a handlebar that does not require you to hold any body weight on it. You do not have to hold your head up to see where you are going . Just because they are no longer in production does not mean when they break you are in trouble , like any other bike on the market you can buy components to fix it. I own a Rans Rocket short wheel base at the moment that I use for commuting / groceries, and it is quick and comfortable. I have had two Rans Waves and they have passive suspension through the frame and are very comfortable. They are also a long wheel base , but when you come to a stop you can put both feet flat on the ground vs tippy toe on a regular bike . There will be a learning curve to riding a recumbent as it does have a slightly different style of riding. The following is a interesting perspective on riding a recumbent, however this guy is a racing type person not your normal recreational " lets go riding to see the sights" person.
    http://bicyclepatents.com/road-biker-tries-recumbents/2067/ I tend to be the latter.
     
  8. Jcycle

    Jcycle Active Member

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    I'm interested in getting a recumbent bike because I use a stationary recumbent cycle at the gym. I have degenerative disc disease in my back, arthritis in my back and hands, plus carpal tunnel in my right wrist. The stationary recumbent in the gym has made my cardio portion of my work out so much better. Any suggestions of where to start looking for a good bike and information on how others with arthritis have fared with this kind of bike would be appreciated!
     
  9. LeonasSword

    LeonasSword New Member

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    I always thought that a recumbent bike was geared more for people with back quandaries, so they can sit further in and more comfortably in a composed seat. But I cerebrate that it could be an answer to your quandary. It does alleviate a plethora of stress off of the wrist. Getting on and off would be the only strain on her arms. So yeah, it could work.
     
  10. Jcycle

    Jcycle Active Member

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    Actually I have found that they aren't that difficult to get on and off of. I have carpal tunnel in my right wrist and arthritis in my fingers and I find it to be easy to get on and off the recumbent bike. You are correct that they are often used for back issues, and I can attest to the fact they do help.
     
  11. ZXD22

    ZXD22 Member

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    Bikes will help out with your arthritis big time! They put less pressure and weight on the back and joints and can really help you out!
     
  12. Jcycle

    Jcycle Active Member

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    Did you mean Recumbent Bikes? Because bicycles in general wont do this.
     
  13. SoloOwners

    SoloOwners New Member

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    Are recumbent bikes easier on the tush? Even compared with having a large soft spring seat on a road bike? The main problem I'm referring to is tush numbness on long rides. I'm in my average weight range for my height and I haven't gotten a big soft spring seat yet, but I'm wondering if the seat will alleviate the numbness or if I should continue looking into a recumbent.
     
  14. CrankyThunder

    CrankyThunder Member

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    Dear Srock:
    I commute by bicycle and use four bicycles for my commute. 10 miles one way.

    Two of my bicycle are recumbents and two are regular diamond frames.

    I choose between a recumbent and a diamond frame based on the condition of my tailbone, neck, upper body, and wrists, IE, if I am sore in one of those areas, I generally select a recumbent. With respect to my wrists, I can assure you that the recumbents remove a majority of the pressure on your wrists and make bicycling fun when my wrists are sore from riding the conventional bicycles. I have both under seat steering and above seat steering. Either one will work.

    I would recommend you search for a recumbent gathering. There is one every year by me and I have attended a couple. Met a lot of fun people and was able to ride a number of bicycles to try them out, also had mine test ridden as well. There are vastly different recumbents out there so a test ride of a prospective purpose is essential. Love my recumbents and encourage you to try them out. Please do not buy sight unseen.

    If you have specific questions, feel free to send me a pm. Would be more then happy to assist you!

    Sincerely,
    George
     
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  15. CyclingJunkies

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    Just to add, a recumbent trike may be more suitable, especially one with underseat steering. The relaxed arm and wrist position should work better for someone with arthritis, and you won't have to get used to the start and stop 'wobble' associated with learning to ride a regular recumbent; trikes allow you to come to a more graceful stop / rest - just don't go hurling it around corners ... ;)
     
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