Recumbent bike harder on knees than upright?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Plin321, Apr 4, 2003.

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  1. Plin321

    Plin321 Guest

    This question related to stationary exercise bikes. I bought a recumbent bike a few moinths back and
    have noticed that I seem to have developed some mild knee pain which I didn't have before when I was
    using my road bike indoors on a wind trainer.

    Are recumbent bikes known to be harder on the knees due to the pedaling position (legs more 'in
    front', relative to body mass, vs. legs below you on an upright) or perhaps it's just the model I
    have (Proform 965R)? I've tried adjusting the seating position (fore and aft) and it doesn't make
    much difference. I wonder if I should sell it and go back to the wind trainer or buy an upright
    instead. I don't want to permanently injure my knees. Thanks.
     
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  2. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "Plin321" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > This question related to stationary exercise bikes. I bought a recumbent
    bike a
    > few moinths back and have noticed that I seem to have developed some mild
    knee
    > pain which I didn't have before when I was using my road bike indoors on a
    wind
    > trainer.
    >
    > Are recumbent bikes known to be harder on the knees due to the pedaling position (legs more 'in
    > front', relative to body mass, vs. legs below you
    on an
    > upright) or perhaps it's just the model I have (Proform 965R)? I've tried adjusting the seating
    > position (fore and aft) and it doesn't make much difference. I wonder if I should sell it and go
    > back to the wind trainer
    or buy
    > an upright instead. I don't want to permanently injure my knees. Thanks.

    Make sure the seat is far enough back, and SPIN.

    Pete
     
  3. Make sure that your knees follow a straight pathway on the power stroke and don't bend in towards
    the center (or outward). This is a common fault in pedaling technique on all types of bikes and
    leads to extra wear on the outside (or inside) edge of the kneecap cartilage. An aid to avoiding
    this for some riders may be the LeWedge Pedal Shims, formerly known as "Big Meat Wedges", by LeMond
    Fitness. They are designed for cleated pedals, but I've made my own version for personal use from
    wood and fiberglass, to fit on standard pedals that have toe straps. They've made a great difference
    in eliminating my knee pain and regressive damage. Here's a webpage that explains this and offers a
    mailorder source for them:

    http://www.cambriabicycleoutfitters.com/pedals/big_meat_pedal_wedges.htm

    Steve McDonald
     
  4. Plin321

    Plin321 Guest

    Thanks, Steve. I think that might have been the problem - I was bowing my legs out a bit while
    pedalling on the recumbent, whereas on an upright doesn't really allow you to do so. I think I'm
    naturally somewhat bowlegged, which may have also contributed to pain while hiking (esp downhill).

    I've since made a conscious effort to keep the pedalling path straight and the pain seems to have
    diminished.

    >Make sure that your knees follow a straight pathway on the power stroke and don't bend in towards
    >the center (or outward). This is a common fault in pedaling technique on all types of bikes and
    >leads to extra wear on the outside (or inside) edge of the kneecap cartilage. An aid to avoiding
    >this for some riders may be the LeWedge Pedal Shims, formerly known as "Big Meat Wedges", by LeMond
    >Fitness. They are designed for cleated pedals, but I've made my own version for personal use from
    >wood and fiberglass, to fit on standard pedals that have toe straps. They've made a great
    >difference in eliminating my knee pain and regressive damage. Here's a webpage that explains this
    >and offers a mailorder source for them:
    >
    >http://www.cambriabicycleoutfitters.com/pedals/big_meat_pedal_wedges.htm
    >
    >Steve McDonald
     
  5. casey crumpacke

    casey crumpacke New Member

    Joined:
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    hi steve. could you give me detais on how you made your wood\fiberglass shims. i donĀ“t clip in and i think this could help my knees. like where they go on the pedals, etc. i think my problem is knees going inward when i pedal up hills. thanks. casey
     
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