Recumbent safety statistics

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by STEVENHAYES, Feb 28, 2010.

  1. STEVENHAYES

    STEVENHAYES New Member

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    Hi,
    I wondered if anyone could direct me to a site where I might find safety statistics about Recumbent HPV's?
    There are sources where I live in the UK which give details of numbers of cyclists killed or seriously injured (KSI) per mile cycled, but these are not broken down into categories of bicycle/HPV.
    I am trying to obtain an objective view of HPV safety before purchasing a recumbent. I am hoping to buy a "Raptobike Lowracer".
    I would be really grateful if anyone could help.
    Cheers
    Steve
     
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  2. "A"

    "A" New Member

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    I don't know much about cycling related stastistics, but when it comes to activities such as riding a bike, or motorcycle, I tend to trust my own ability then stastistics.
    Just like trying anything new for the first time, start out slow and stay within your omfort zone even when you think you've got the basics down.
    Some consider recumbents have disadvantage of difficult to see in traffic, I never thought so. IMO, being seen in traffic is highly dependent on how you operate a vehicle in traffic.
     
  3. blazingpedals

    blazingpedals New Member

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    I'm not aware of any statistics that separate recumbents from uprights. To the bean counters, they're all bicycles, and any statements by us recumbent riders is purely anecdotal.

    Anecdotally, I think recumbents would have fewer accidents; the reason being that the Huffy riders out there skew the statistics and therefore 'bent riders are less likely than the 'average' upright rider to do stupid stuff like wrong-way riding and riding after dark with no lights or reflectors (the two leading causes of car/bicycle accidents.) That aspect would be purely dependent on the rider's skill level, not an indication that the bike itself is safer. However, falling from a recumbent is less likely to mean a trip to the hospital, due to the lower seating and the feet-first position of the rider. I've never seen a broken clavicle resulting from a recumbent rider going down.
     
  4. zoxed

    zoxed New Member

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    IFAIK no-one has any stats broken down by bicycle type, and I suspect even if they did then the numbers from recumbent accidents may fall below the statistically significant level.
    IMHO the most important thing is the riders skill: I can not believe what stupid things other cyclists do: not looking before pulling out etc. Of course somethings are beyond your control: if a SUV drives over you then you are a goner, but if you learnt about road positioning, anticipation etc you can avoid most problems. Cycling is very safe, and even safer if you take yourself out of the unskilled/do-not-care class of riders.
    My advice: get the bike, but learn to be aware of your surroundings. Read Franklin's book. Have fun and do not boil it all down to numbers !!
    (Sorry: the answer you were looking for !!)
    My advice: get the bike, but learn to be aware of your surroundings. Read Franklin's book. Have fun and do not boil it all down to numbers !! (Sorry: the answer you were looking for !!)
     
  5. bent4speed

    bent4speed New Member

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    As stated above if you are careful and use your head a recumbent is just as safe as a any other bike. Safety also has a lot to do with where you ride.
     
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