Recumbent Trike Suspension: What Is DTSwiss SSD225?



A

Artemisia

Guest
Now that I've decided on the HP Velotechnik Scorpion FX, I'm trying to
figure out the singularly unhelpful price list.

The Scorpion comes with suspension as standard, but an option costing
269€, called DTSwiss SSD225, offers "lightweight air shock, adj. rebound
damping".

Searching through the site, it says "The optional DTSwiss SSD225 air
shock unit has external damping adjustment, allowing you to adjust the
release rate for different road conditions." I've done some more
googling, and have read postings from people having maintenance problems
with this option.

So what is it all about? I want the least bother and the most comfort
with the suspension. I don't know a lot about maintenance and the LBS
for this trike will be very hard to access, so I don't want to deal with
something too technical. Do I go for this option or the standard option
with the maximum hardness of spring (due to my weight)?

Thanks to anyone who can inform,

EFR
Ile de France
 
S

squeaker

Guest
On 26 Aug, 19:10, Artemisia <[email protected]> wrote:
> The Scorpion comes with suspension as standard, but an option costing
> 269€, called DTSwiss SSD225, offers "lightweight air shock, adj. rebound
> damping".
>
> Searching through the site, it says "The optional DTSwiss SSD225 air
> shock unit has external damping adjustment, allowing you to adjust the
> release rate for different road conditions." I've done some more
> googling, and have read postings from people having maintenance problems
> with this option.
>
> So what is it all about? I want the least bother and the most comfort
> with the suspension. I don't know a lot about maintenance and the LBS
> for this trike will be very hard to access, so I don't want to deal with
> something too technical. Do I go for this option or the standard option
> with the maximum hardness of spring (due to my weight)?


Standard shock is DNM DV-22: cheap, cheerful and of variable quality
IME (the one on my Grasshopper lost all its damping after ~15 months,
the one on the Mistral was under-damped for the application IMHO, and
made cheerful 'squidging' noises). Air suspension shocks are light
and never cease to amaze me w.r.t. their ability to hold air pressure
for long periods (e.g. Fox on my 1999 Marin MTB gets checked about
once a year - usually doesn't need adjusting).
SSD225's are very well made, work well on both my recumbent bikes
(adjustable damping is good) but are a bit hi-tech compared with
having an old fashioned steel spring!
HPV use a 152mm rear shock (on the Grasshopper - don't know about
other bikes / trike) that is shorter than the very common MTB 165mm
eye-to-eye length, which narrows the choice more than somewhat. I
suppose if I were touring in Outer Mongolia I might look for a decent
steel spring unit (steel springs can / do break), but for more local
use I am more than happy to rely on modern air spring technology - but
as a mechanical engineer I would say that, wouldn't I?
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
Artemisia wrote:

> The Scorpion comes with suspension as standard, but an option costing
> 269€, called DTSwiss SSD225, offers "lightweight air shock, adj. rebound
> damping".
>
> Searching through the site, it says "The optional DTSwiss SSD225 air
> shock unit has external damping adjustment, allowing you to adjust the
> release rate for different road conditions." I've done some more
> googling, and have read postings from people having maintenance problems
> with this option.
>
> So what is it all about? I want the least bother and the most comfort
> with the suspension.


Isn't that what everyone would want? The best of all possible worlds?
Unfortunately, the world is not that simple, and the reason you get
things you can fiddle with (more bother) is so you can get the best
suspension effect for your particular machine, person and riding style.

> I don't know a lot about maintenance and the LBS
> for this trike will be very hard to access, so I don't want to deal with
> something too technical. Do I go for this option or the standard option
> with the maximum hardness of spring (due to my weight)?


Shockers are standard bike components these days, and the DT-Swiss is
certainly not HPVel or even recumbent specific. Any half-decent LBS
that sells mountain bikes should know all that's needed about a rear
suspension unit.

However, given that your budget appears to be something you'd like to
rein in a little, I'd be inclined to get the basic unit, which does work
even if it isn't the greatest, and worry about putting something nicer
on if or when it goes The Way Of The Pear. I've got the basic unit
HPVel use on my Streetmachine, and ~5 years after buying it it's still
apparently working fine, in which time maintenance and fettling I've
done on it has been cleaning and re-greasing the mounting bushes every
couple of years (few minutes, tools needed are Allen keys to get the
shock unit out and back in, a cloth to wipe things and some standard
grease to re-goop, you don't need to get inside or adjust anything). So
you get the no-fuss that way, you can't get it wrong, and the suspension
is acceptable if not absolutely optimum.

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/